Instructional Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes
Chair
: Dr. Jeffrey Olson,   Vice-Chair: Kim He Crow Recorder: Julie Johnson

March 11, 2011

Woksape Tipi, Academic & Public Library

 

In attendance at meeting: Ahmed Al-Asfour, Georgia Rooks,   Jim Dudek, Charles Jason Tinant, Kimberly Bettelyoun, Jean Reeves, Bill Okrepkie, Laura Dunn, Kirk Costion, Jeffrey Olson,  Anthony Fresquez,  Joseph Kirk, Lavera Rose, Thedna Zimiga, Leslie Mesteth, Julie Johnson, Dawn Frank, Sharon Running Hawk, Susie White Thunder, Bessie LeBeau, Tom Raymond, Lynnea Bouhenguel, Kiri Close, Corey Yellow Boy, Elaine Gibbons, Richard Jones  

 

1.      Meeting called to order at 11:03a.m.

 

2.      Prayer offered by Susie White Thunder

 

3.      Minutes from February 4, 2011 put forth for approval. (page 3)

Motion to accept the meeting minutes from February 4, 2011

 

a.       Motion to accept: Bill Okrepkie

b.      Seconded: Kim Bettelyoun

Vote – Unanimous

 

4.      Old Business – Second Readings

 

a.       AA degree changes up for second reading

 

                                                  i.      The A.A. will be housed in the Registrar’s Office (Not Humanities)

                                                ii.      Additional review of total credit hours in order to reduce the amount

                                              iii.      Possible removal of the term “General” in the General Business emphasis

                                              iv.      Students must declare a degree at the baccalaureate level prior to starting the A.A. degree so that students will be advised in their emphasis area

      Motion is made by Tony Fresquez to eliminate the existing and proposed A.A. degrees in Liberal Studies.

       Seconded:  Leslie Mesteth

       Vote:  Yes-19

                  No-4

                  

b.      Social Science Dept –

iv.          Environmental policy & politics - new course – (page 7)

Motion to accept:  Bill Okrepkie

Seconded:  Georgia Rooks

Vote- Unanimous

 

b.      Graduate Studies – Plan B Option LakM 613B and LakM 613B  for second reading – (page 15)

                  Motion to Accept:  Bill Okrepkie

                   Seconded:  Tony Fresquez

                  Vote:  Unanimous

c.       Humanities – New course Spcm 433 – (page 23)

                  Motion to Accept:  Bill Okrepkie

                  Seconded:  Tony Fresquez

                  Vote-Unanimous

d.      Humanities – New course – Engl 493, Scholarly Project (page 26)

      Motion to Accept:  Bill Okrepkie

      Seconded:  Tony Fresquez

      Vote-Unanimous

e.       Humanities – Humanities/SS status sheet change/degree change – (Page 27, 28, 30, 32)

      Motion to Accept:  Bill Okrepkie

      Seconded:  Jean Reeves

      Vote-Unanimous

f.       Social Science – New course Pols 343, Govt. Administration – (page 86)

      Motion to Accept:  Tony Fresquez

      Seconded:  Jason Tinant

      Vote-Unanimous

g.      AA/BA Early Childhood Status Changes

      Motion to Accept:  Thedna Zimiga

      Seconded:  Susie White Thunder

      Vote:  Yes -20

                  No-1

                  Abstain-2

 

 

7.                    Motion to adjourn:  Bessie LeBeau

                        Seconded:   Elaine Gibbons

                        Meeting adjourned at 12:12 p.m.

                                     

                       


Instructional Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes
Chair
: Dr. Jeffrey Olson,   Vice-Chair: Kim He Crow Recorder: Julie Johnson

February 4, 2011

Woksape Tipi, Academic & Public Library

 

In attendance at meeting: Elaine Gibbons, Ahmed Al-Asfour, Georgia Rooks,   Jim Dudek, Charles Jason Tinant, Kimberly Bettelyoun, Bill Okrepkie, Laura Dunn, Kirk Costion, Jeffrey Olson,  Anthony Fresquez,  Lavera Rose, Thedna Zimiga, Leslie Mesteth, Julie Johnson, Dawn Frank, Sharon Running Hawk, Tom Raymond, Kiri Close, Al Schwam , Jean Reeves, Susie White Thunder, Bessie LeBeau

 

5.      Meeting called to order at 11:14 a.m.

 

6.      Prayer offered by Laura Dunn.

 

7.      Minutes from Jan. 21, 2011 put forth for approval.

Motion to accept the meeting minutes from Jan. 21, 2011

 

a.       Motion to accept: Georgia Rooks

b.      Seconded: Tom Raymond

Vote – Unanimous

 

8.      Old Business – Social Science changes for catalog 2011 put forth for second reading. 

 

a.       Motion to accept: Tony Fresquez

b.      Seconded: Tony Raymond

         Vote – Unanimous

 

9.      Break into sub-committees at 11:37 a.m.

 

10.  Sub-committee’s reconvened at 12:03 p.m.

 

 

a.       Webpage Development Committee- Did not report.

 

b.      A.A. Committee-Did not report.

 

c.       Strategic Plan Committee-Did not report.

 

d.      Catalog Committee-Did not report.   

 

e.       Curriculum Committee-

 

iv.                Social Science Dept – Government Administration Course and Environmental Studies be recommended for second reading

                        Motion to accept: Lynnae Bouhenguel

                        Seconded: Bill O’Krepkie

                        Vote – Unanimous

 

v.            Social Science Dept. – BA in Social Science Status Sheet Changes

                        Motion to accept: Lynnae Bouhenguel

                        Seconded: Bill O’Krepkie

                        Vote – Unanimous

 

  iii. Graduate Studies – Plan B Option be recommended for second reading.

                        Motion to accept: Lynea

                        Seconded: Bill O’Krepkie

                        Vote – Unanimous

 

iv.    Humanities – Packet of Proposed Changes recommend for seconded reading with changes (36 hours to 18 hours in upper level courses and listing of courses on cover sheet).

                        Motion to accept:  Julie Johnson

                        Seconded: Georgia Rooks

                        Vote – Unanimous

 

 

7.                    Motion to adjourn at 12:11 p.m

a.           Motion to accept: Tony Fresquez

b.      Seconded: Tony Raymond

                  Vote – Unanimous

                 Meeting adjourned at 12:13 p.m.

 

            

                       

 


Aa degree
                                                                       

CIRCULAR ROUTING SHEET

For

CHANGES IN POLICY/CURRICULUM RECOMMENDATIONS

 

Attached is the recommendation from the ___________________________________Committee.

 

Title: ____Environmental Policy and Politics_________________________________________

 

Affects:                ___Policy #________________      ___Curriculum / Dept. Chair________________

 

___New Policy                                     _X_New Curriculum

___Modifies Existing Policy                   ___Modifies Existing Curriculum

___Deletes Existing Policy                    ___Deletes Existing Curriculum

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

_________________________________________

Person Originating the Action                        Date

                                                                                    Action Taken

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Committee Chairperson                         Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

PWO Chairperson                                 Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Vice President for Instruction                 Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

President                                              Date

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

BOT Committee Action                         Date

 

______________________________________             ____________________________________

BOT Action                                          Date

 

 

Final Approval/Disapproval rerouted to submitters on: __________________________________

 

Explanations concerning disapproval or implementation:  ________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

*Please make a copy of this and route it back to the committee it originated from.

Note: Dates are official meetings when action was taken.


Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course Change

 

__X__New ____Revised

 

Course Title: Environmental Policy and Politics

 

Statement of Need and Purposes

 

The protection of land, air, and water is a priority for tribal governments and members.  This course will primarily serve students who wish to work in land and natural resource agencies in tribal, federal, or state government.

 

Environmental careers are expanding, and employers seek trained graduates.  This course will complement course work in the natural sciences for the many students from those disciplines who will work in government.  It will also provide social science students with depth of knowledge in a key area of government, industry, consultant, and interest group activity.

 

Special attention will be given to topics of importance on the Pine Ridge Reservation, such as water quality, the Black Hills land issue, energy production, climate change, park management, and the Bombing Range clean-up.  Students will become prepared to deal with these and other issues in the context of tribal law, federal law, and global impacts.

 

College Requirements Affected

 

The prerequisite will be English 113 with a “C” or better.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues

 

To be taught every fourth or fifth semester

 

Catalogue Description

 

This course examines how environmental policies are formed and implemented – or not implemented.  We’ll study the basic United States environmental policies and look at how these policies impact land and resources on reservations, nationally, and globally.  The emphasis is on providing students who will work in natural resource areas the practical policy information they need to be successful professionals, particularly in government agencies.  Lakota land and resources issues receive special consideration.

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalog description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)


Pols 423

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND POLITICS

Section

 

Instructor: Lilias Jarding, Ph.D.     Phone: 605-787-2872      E-mail: ljarding@olc.edu

Meetings with students before class, after class, and by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines how environmental policies are formed and implemented – or not implemented.  We’ll study the basic United States environmental policies and look at how these policies impact land and resources on reservations, nationally, and globally.  The emphasis is on providing students who will work in natural resource areas the practical policy information they need to be successful professionals, particularly in government agencies.  Lakota land and resources issues receive special consideration.

 

COURSE FORMAT

The course format involves careful reading and note-taking, in-class discussion, lectures, a research paper and presentation, a midterm examination, and a final examination.  This class will require at least four hours of work per week outside of class time, with additional time required before examinations and before the research paper due date.  Please make the necessary time commitment, so you can do well in this course.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. To gain a basic understanding of the actors, institutions, and processes involved in environmental issues, particularly as they impact Lakota territory.
  2. To develop a better ability to critically analyze viewpoints, policies, and strategies at the federal, global, and tribal levels.
  3. To improve reading and writing skills and to be able to apply them in professional endeavors.
  4. To be able to apply the information gained in this course to future activities related to environmental protection and management.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS        

Political Science is a reading-intensive field, and you need to be able to read and understand as much as 70 pages a week for this class.  You must also be able to express your thoughts clearly in written and oral form and take careful notes in class.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please see me or contact Lenora Hudson at 605-455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs.

 

If your writing, test-taking, speaking, or reading skills may not be sufficient for this course, please see me immediately so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  Do not wait until after you do poorly on the midterm -- see me now.

 

Grading: Assignments will be graded as follows:

            Midterm Examination  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   75 points

            Class Participation (25 points for each quarter of semester)  .   100 points

            Panel Discussions (25 points each)  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 50 points

            Topic Paper  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 10 points

Research Paper  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   140 points

            Research Paper Presentation  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  40 points

            Final Examination  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   85 points

                        Total Points                                                       500 points

 

Grading Scale: A: 450-500 points; B: 400-449 points; C: 350-399 points; D: 300-349 points; F: less than 300 points.  Your grade is based on your mastery of the material.  I do not curve grades.  There is no extra credit.

 

In-Class Participation: Class participation is critical to this course.  Students will be graded both on how often they participate in in-class activities and on the quality of their participation.  Merely being present does not equal participation.  Guidelines on class participation are available in Dr. Jarding’s webfolder (www.olc.edu/~ljarding/webfolder).  You will receive four participation grades during the semester, with a written explanation.  Each participation grade is a possible 25 points (100 points total).

 

Panel Discussions: Students will have two opportunities to present and discuss the day’s readings as part of a team (50 points total).  If all readings are not covered in this manner, students may earn extra credit by taking part in additional panel discussions.

 

Research Project: Each student will select one of the environmental policies covered in this course and research how it is related to their community.  Preliminary research will be done to generate a topic paper, indicating the topic the student will research.

 

Students will be expected to explain how local issues relate to broader issues and policies.  This will include library and internet research.  It will also include conducting at least two face-to-face interviews with community leaders who are involved with the issue being researched.  These may be government employees, nonprofit group leaders, or community experts, but should not be immediate relatives or friends – unless these people are considered experts on the topic being researched.  Additional information may need to be gathered by telephone or e-mail.

 

All information in your research paper must be cited properly.  A complete bibliography must be attached to your paper.

 

The topic for your paper is due in Week Three.  The paper is due in Week Fourteen and will be at least 10 pages, double-spaced.  Margins will be 1” on all four sides, and the paper will be in 12-point Times New Roman font (140 points).

 

Presentation: Each student will present the results of their research to the class.  The use of Power Point slides is encouraged (40 points).

 

Midterm Examination: The midterm examination will be a take-home examination composed of essay questions.  You will have one week to complete the midterm (75 points). 

 

Final Examination: The final examination will consist of short and long essay questions that cover the material in the entire course (85 points).

 

Late Assignments: Late research papers will be accepted up until the last class period, but will lose 20% of the points earned for the assignment.   The instructor does not give Incompletes.

 

EXPECTATIONS

Much emphasis is put on Lakota values, particularly respect in the classroom.  Being respectful in this class includes:

 

Communication: Students will use OLC e-mail for this class and are expected to check their e-mail at least twice a week.  You are responsible for all information the Instructor sends to you via e-mail.  You will also need to download some course materials through the course webfolder.  If class is cancelled for any reason, the instructor will call the college center, and an e-mail will be sent to all students.

 

Tardiness: In formulating this policy it is understood that unique problems exist for both students and faculty due to the decentralized nature of OLC.  Since classes meet only once per week, it is important that they be held – even if they begin late.

 

 If an instructor is going to be late getting to a college center for a class, the center staff will be notified, if at all possible.  A student shall be considered tardy for class, if he/she arrives late, but during the first hour of the class.  A student arriving later than this -- or leaving more than an hour before the end of the formal class time -- may be marked absent.

 

If an instructor is late for a class, students must wait for one-half hour.  After this time, the class will be considered cancelled for that week and must be made up.  In the event that no students appear for class at the scheduled starting time, the instructor should wait at least one-half hour before deciding to cancel the class.

 

Attendance Policy: Students are required to attend classes regularly.  Instructors will submit attendance on-line weekly.  If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student's responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor.  At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment.  However, an excused absence is the same as an unexcused absence until the student has completed work equivalent to being in class. Once the make-up assignment is completed, the instructor will then change the “absent” to “present.” 

 

A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences and will be dropped by the Registrar after five total absences.   There are NO reinstatements and NO exceptions for students who are dropped for five absences.  Students are responsible for tracking the number of absences listed in Jenzabar and for preventing themselves from being dropped from the course.  The instructor does not have the ability to change an “absent” to “present” after the student has missed five classes.

 

Students are also responsible for getting the notes from missed classes from other students.  The Instructor does not provide class notes.  Information that is discussed in class may be covered on the midterms and during the final examination, even if it is not included in the readings, videos, or Power Points.

 

Withdrawal from Course: February 4th is the last day you can drop this course for a full refund.  If you drop the course after this date, you will receive a Withdrawal (W) grade for the course, which will appear on your official transcript.

 

Academic Integrity: Students are expected to avoid both the act and the appearance of plagiarism and cheating.  Exams and assignments must be your own work.  Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit when the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; aids another student in representing work of another as their own; and/or breaks stated examination rules. 

 

Unintentional plagiarism is just as unacceptable as intentional plagiarism.  It is never okay to cut and paste text from another source into your paper without proper citation.  Students need to cite authors not only when they use another author’s exact words, but also when they paraphrase or just refer to someone else’s ideas.

 

Students who plagiarize or cheat will receive an “F” on the assignment and may also be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing set up by the Vice President for Instruction.

 

Academic Freedom: Student academic performance may be evaluated only on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards.  Students should be free to take reasoned exception to the views offered in any course and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course for which they are enrolled.  Students who believe that an academic evaluation is prejudiced or capricious should first contact the instructor to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the instructor’s Department Chair to initiate a review of the evaluation.

 

READINGS

Required Readings

Rosenbaum, Walter A.  Environmental Politics and Policy, 8th ed.  Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2011.

 

Wildcat, Daniel R.  Red Alert: Saving the Planet with Indigenous Knowledge.  Golden, CO.: Fulcrum Publishing, 2009.

 

Ostler, Jeffrey.  The Lakotas and the Black Hills: The Struggle for Sacred Ground.  New York: Penguin Group, 2010.

 

Webfolder

Additional assigned readings are available on the internet and in the instructor’s webfolder (www.olc.edu/~ljarding/webfolder).  To access a document in the webfolder, go to the url and click on the name of your course.  Then click on the name of the document you want to view.   Use a left click to view and read the document online.  To download the reading to your own computer or flash drive, you must right-click the file name and choose the “Save As” option.

 

Other Needed Supplies

Students will need to use a notebook for class notes.   Please use a black or blue pen for in-class assignments.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE

 

Week One: Introduction to the Course, to Each Other, and to Environmental Policy

 

Week Two: Background

Reading: Hardin, “The Tragedy of the Commons” --

                http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html

               Rosenbaum, Chapter 1 and Chapter 2

 

Week Three: Policymaking: Institutions, Politics, and Environmental Justice

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 3 and Chapter 4

   “Energy: Fossil Fuels and Impacts to Indigenous Peoples” –

http://www.ienearth.org/docs/energy_intro.html

 

Week Four: Regulatory Economics; Citation and Avoiding Plagiarism

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 5

 

Week Five: Public Lands and Parks; Research Methods; Topic Paper Due

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 9

 

Week Six: Air and Water Quality; Midterm Handed Out

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 6

                LaDuke, “Northern Cheyenne: A Fire in the Coal Fields” (in webfolder)

                Kropf, “Allotment Water Rights” (in webfolder)

 

Week Seven: Nuclear Energy; Midterm Due

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 8 through page 279

               “Uranium Activities in Lakota Territory” (in webfolder)

 

Week Eight: Oil Transportation and Refining

Reading: Rosenbaum, rest of Chapter 8

 

Week Nine: Toxic and Hazardous Substances; Global Issues

Reading: Rosenbaum, Chapter 7 and Chapter 10

               Oglala Lakota Nation Natural Resources Regulatory Agency – online at http://www.oglalalakotanation.org/Tribal_Programs_Natural_Resources_Regulatory_Agency.html

 

Week Ten: Native Lands: Background

Reading: Clow and Sutton, Article 12 (in webfolder)

                Ostler, Introduction and Chapters 1 through 3

 

Week Eleven: The Lakotas and the Black Hills

Reading: Ostler, Chapters 4 through 6  

 

Week Twelve: Climate Change; Presentation Skills

Reading: Ostler, Chapter 7 and Conclusion

                Wildcat, Introduction and Chapters 1 through 3

 

Week Thirteen: Indigenous Thought and Climate Change

Reading: Wildcat, Chapters 4 through 7 and Conclusion

 

Week Fourteen: Research Presentations; Wrap-Up and Review

 

Week Fifteen: Final Examination

 

DISCLAIMER

Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed at the beginning of the semester.  However, the syllabus is not a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student.  The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique without notice or obligation.


CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR REVISED:

 

            Course_______________________                           Certificate_______________

            *AA Degree__________________                            Minor___________________

            *BS Degree___________________                           Other__Graduate Course__

 

New__X____ or Revised_______________

Title:_ Community Development and Self-Sufficiency II_

Course Numbers__LakM 613 B_________________________________________

Credits:__3 credits________    Pre-requisites:_LakM 613 A Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I_________

Overview

 

The Graduate Studies Department would like to create two courses LakM 613 A Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I and LakM 613 B Community Development and Self-Sufficiency II.  These two courses serve as a second option to the capstone educational experience in applied management for the Master of Arts in Lakota Leadership and Management degree.  Graduate Candidates will apply the selected Leadership and Management skills in the public and private sector in; tribal and non tribal governmental and social structures, social or enterprise operations in the development, management, and ongoing evaluation of programs. These two courses are designed to provide an opportunity for the Graduate Candidate to demonstrate the Lakota Leadership and Management skills and concepts through a Wolakota perspective. This course is an immersive leadership experience encouraging the Graduate Candidate to use discretion in decision making, analysis, and evaluation beyond the exercise of routine tasks under the mentorship of faculty and community leaders.

 

This capstone course is an alternative to the LakM 596 CAP. The selected community member chosen in LakM 613A Community Development and Self Sufficiency I will continue to serve in an advisory and mentor capacity to the project. 

Graduate Candidates will be required to continue to maintain a log of hours, contacts and reflective practice. Graduate Candidates will continue to serve in a hypothetical professional staff or consulting capacity to the selected project without charge for services. The implementation and evaluation of the proposed conceptual framework will thus be meaningful with a high level of professionalism and competence in presentation for graduate student, public /private organization, and the community.

 

Course Description

 

LakM 613 B Community Development and Self-Sufficiency II

 

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management Candidates from a tribal treaty context focusing on community development and self sufficiency. This course is for candidates who have completed a conceptual framework in community development and self sufficiency. Candidates will identify similar programs and best practices, to evaluate and critique from a Wolakota perspective. Candidates will be required to demonstrate Lakota Leadership through presentation and implementation of findings. Candidates are required to demonstrate Wacante Ognaka meaning holding people in their heart through compassion and generosity. Effective Lakota Leaders demonstrate compassion and generosity through the delivery and giving of their knowledge, skills and ability to the educational and local communities.

 

Course Objectives

 

  1. To know and demonstrate concise APA style writing.
  2. Understand the complexities of tribal sovereignty in managing public/private programs.
  3. Demonstrate Lakota leadership disposition skills.
  4. Interpret the relationship between various aspects of Lakota social organization and Lakota leadership and management practices.
  5. Identify through research exemplary private/public programs and best practices appropriate for reservation situations.
  6. Evaluate and critique similar existing community development/self sufficiency circumstances from a Wolakota perspective.
  7. Formally present findings and recommendations for program implementation of strategic and systems change.
  8. Reflect on the implementation and experiences gained through a Wolakota perspective used in the community development and self sufficiency I and II course.

 

Prerequisite is LakM 613 A Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I (3 credits).

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

 

The development of a new 613 A and 613 B provides an alternative capstone experience specifically using leadership and management disposition, concepts and skills that are harmonious with Lakota values. These structured courses are needed to guide the Graduate Candidate through the development of a conceptual framework toward an in depth experience in application and evaluation. These courses are needed and required to integrate the theory with practice.

 

This course is needed to contribute and enhance community development and promote self sufficiency (private/public) aligned with the Graduate Studies theme of Oyate Ta Wowasu meaning through sovereignty, self-sufficiency, and decolonization. This course is fully integrates the Oglala Lakota College Wolakota Perspective.

These courses are needed to continue to enhance the philosophy of the graduate program recognizing a leader as someone who works for, with, and among the people, as well as takes action for the people.

 

The benefit of an additional option will allow the LakM Graduate Candidate the ability to enroll in LakM 613 A and LakM 613 B while enrolling in the remaining professional core courses to maintain full time Graduate Candidate Status. The new courses provide the Graduate Candidate with a structured classroom. This structured classroom will consists of lectures, in class research and collaborative group exercises that integrate the tribal social aspects of community and promote the use of administrative tools that were developed during the masters program. The Graduate Candidates’ project will be an applied, best practices approach to community development and self-sufficiency, rather than individual, primary research focus of LakM 596.

 

College Requirements Affected:

 

Graduate Candidates process will not be affected. The development of both LakM 613 A Community Development and Self Sufficiency I and LakM 613 B Community Development and Self Sufficiency II  create an another option called Option B for Graduate Candidates who have successfully completed their required core and professional core courses in the Lakota Leadership and Management degree program.  All candidates will be eligible to enter into either the existing LakM 596 Community Action Project or the proposed two courses LakM 613 A and LakM 613 B.   Both Capstone experiences are 6 credit hours.

 

This option will not be available for the Lakota Leadership and Management: Education Administration degree at this time.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

 

There is no extra cost or undue financial burden placed on the Graduate Studies Department or the Oglala Lakota College. 

 

Catalogue Description:

 

New course. 

 

LakM 613 B Community Development and Self-Sufficiency II

 

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management Candidates from a tribal treaty context focusing on community development and self sufficiency. This course is for candidates who have completed a conceptual framework in community development and self sufficiency. Candidates will identify similar programs and best practices, to evaluate and critique from a Wolakota perspective. Candidates will be required to demonstrate Lakota Leadership through presentation and implementation of findings. Candidates are required to demonstrate Wacante Ognaka meaning holding people in their heart through compassion and generosity. Effective Lakota Leaders demonstrate compassion and generosity through the delivery and giving of their knowledge, skills and ability to the educational and local communities.

 

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional response are required.

 

_ Dawn Frank________1/31/11_________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR REVISED:

 

            Course_______________________                           Certificate_______________

            *AA Degree__________________                            Minor___________________

            *BS Degree___________________                           Other__Graduate Course__

 

New__X____ or Revised_______________

Title:_ Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I_

Course Numbers__LakM 613 A_________________________________________

Credits:__3 credits________    Prerequisites:_ Lakota Leadership and management Core LakM 603, LakM 533, LakM 513 Professional Core LakM 523, LakM 553, LakM 563, LakM 573, LakM 593. (excluding LakM 583, LakM 543)

Narrative:

 

The Graduate Studies Department would like to create two courses LakM 613 A Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I and LakM 613 B Community Development and Self-Sufficiency II.  These two courses serve as a second option to the capstone educational experience in applied management for the Master of Arts in Lakota Leadership and Management degree.  Graduate Candidates will apply the selected Leadership and Management skills in the public and private sector in; tribal and non tribal governmental and social structures, social or enterprise operations in the development, management, and ongoing evaluation of programs. These two courses are designed to provide an opportunity for the Graduate Candidate to demonstrate the Lakota Leadership and Management skills and concepts through a Wolakota perspective. This course is an immersive leadership experience encouraging the Graduate Candidate to use discretion in decision making, analysis, and evaluation beyond the exercise of routine tasks under the mentorship of faculty and community leaders.

 

This capstone course is an alternative to the LakM 596 Community Action Project. Graduate Candidates strategic plan will be approved by the Graduate Studies Director/Chair and the full time Graduate faculty. One community member in the affected existing program or an area closely related to the designed conceptual framework will serve in an advisory and mentor capacity to the project.  Graduate Candidates will be required to maintain a log of hours, contacts and reflective practice.

Graduate Candidates will serve in a hypothetical professional staff or consulting capacity to the selected project without charge for services, but are expected to select projects that are relevant to their future prospective career goals.  The conceptual framework proposal will thus be meaningful with a high level of professionalism and competence in presentation for graduate student, public /private organization, and the community.

 

 

Course Description

 

LakM 613 A Community Development and Self-Sufficiency I (3 credits)

 

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management Candidates from a tribal treaty context focusing on community development and self sufficiency. This course offers lectures, student collaboration and inquiry based learning from a Wolakota perspective. Master Candidates will gain a comprehensive understanding of public and private programs, and strategies; administrative tools and data analysis methodologies. Master Candidates will develop a conceptual framework for a tribal or community private/public program or enterprise such as; a human service program or community development organization. Candidates are required to demonstrate Woksape meaning Wisdom and Wacante Ognaka meaning holding people in their heart through compassion and generosity when developing their conceptual framework.

 

Student Learning Objectives;

 

  1. To know and demonstrate concise APA style writing.
  2. Understand the complexities of tribal sovereignty in managing public/private programs.
  3. Demonstrate Lakota leadership disposition skills.
  4. Interpret the relationship between various aspects of Lakota social organization and Lakota leadership and management practices.
  5. Comprehend the nature of public/private programs in a tribal treaty context for long term self sufficiency.
  6. Identify and apply various community needs and market analysis tools.
  7. Integrate appropriate statistical, budgetary or financial analysis using a clear analytical methodology.
  8. Conceptualize a community development/self sufficiency framework based on a strategic analysis of an organization.
  9. Reflect on the process and conceptual framework developed through a Wolakota perspective used in the Community Development Self Sufficiency I course.

 

 

Pre requisite: All core and professional core courses in Lakota Leadership and Management degree (30 credit hours).

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

 

The development of a new 613 A and 613 B provides an alternative capstone experience specifically using leadership and management disposition, concepts and skills that are harmonious with Lakota values. These structured courses are needed to guide the Graduate Candidate through the development of a conceptual framework toward an in depth experience in application and evaluation. These courses are needed and required to integrate the theory with practice.

 

This course is needed to contribute and enhance community development and promote self sufficiency (private/public) aligned with the Graduate Studies theme of Oyate Ta Wowasu meaning through sovereignty, self-sufficiency, and decolonization. This course is fully integrates the Oglala Lakota College Wolakota Perspective. These courses are needed to continue to enhance the philosophy of the graduate program recognizing a leader as someone who works for, with, and among the people, as well as takes action for the people.

 

The benefit of an additional option will allow the LakM Graduate Candidate the ability to enroll in LakM 613 A and LakM 613 B while enrolling in the remaining professional core courses to maintain full time Graduate Candidate Status. The new courses provide the Graduate Candidate with a structured classroom. This structured classroom will consists of lectures, in class research and collaborative group exercises that integrate the tribal aspects of community and promote the use of administrative tools that were developed during the masters program. The Graduate Candidates’ project will be an applied, best practices approach to community development and self-sufficiency, rather than individual, primary research focus of LakM 596.

 

College Requirements Affected:

 

Graduate Candidates process will not be affected. The development of both LakM 613 A Community Development and Self Sufficiency I and LakM 613 B Community Development and Self Sufficiency II  create an another option called Option B for Graduate Candidates who have successfully completed their required core and professional core courses in the Lakota Leadership and Management degree program.  All candidates will be eligible to enter into either the existing LakM 596 Community Action Project  or the proposed two courses LakM 613 A and LakM 613 B.   Both Capstone experiences are 6 credit hours.

 

This option will not be available for the Lakota Leadership and Management: Education Administration degree at this time.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

 

There is no extra cost or undue financial burden placed on the Graduate Studies Department or the Oglala Lakota College. 

 

Catalogue Description:

 

New course. 

 

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management candidates from a tribal treaty context focusing on community development and self sufficiency. This course offers lectures, student collaboration and inquiry based learning from a Wolakota perspective. Master Candidates will gain a comprehensive understanding of public and private programs, and strategies; administrative tools and data analysis methodologies. Master Candidates will develop a conceptual framework for a tribal or community private/public program or enterprise such as; a human service program or community development organization. Candidates are required to demonstrate Woksape meaning Wisdom and Wacante Ognaka meaning holding people in their heart through compassion and generosity when developing their conceptual framework.

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional response are required.

 

_ Dawn Frank________1/31/11_________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR REVISED:

 

   COURSE   Advanced Human Communication Skills                                   Certificate

   AA Degree                                                                                                      Minor

   BA/BS:  Degree   BA degree in Humanities and Social Science                   Other

 

New   X               or Revised

 

Title:  Advanced Human Communication Skills

Course Numbers:  SpCm  433

Credits  3                                                                             Prerequisites  SpCm 103

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:   

Required course for Oral and Written Concentration for the BA in Humanities and Social         Science.

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

No additional Staffing costs.  Course will be taught by current Humanities

Department faculty.  Current full-time and adjunct faculty are available to

teach this course.

 

 

Catalogue Description

Students will learn how to create group presentations and how to prepare for questions that they may encounter. The productivity of organizations depends on effective oral communication between people. This course takes a developmental approach by combining theory, research and applications for improving interpersonal and public effectiveness in organizations.

 

 

 

 

 

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

CURRICULUM CHANGE FORM

PROPOSAL FOR DEGREE CHANGE:

New__________________

Revised_____xx__________

Deleted_______________

 

Course:  Engl 223 Advanced Composition I (Change to Engl 283)

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

We want to change the course number to align with Advanced Comp II, so we are changing it from Engl 223 to Engl 283

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

No changes from current program budget

 

Catalogue Description:

 

Current Description (stays the same)

This course helps students learn to write persuasive and argumentative papers. It will also help students further develop researching, interviewing and reporting skills.

Prerequisite:  Engl 113

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

____________________________________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


 

CURRICULUM CHANGE FORM

PROPOSAL FOR DEGREE CHANGE:

New__________________

Revised______xx_________

Deleted_______________

 

Course:  Engl 420 Advanced Creative Writing  (Change to Engl 423)

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

We want to change the number from Engl 420 to 423 to align with Engl 323 Creative Writing so that the courses can be taught at the same time.

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

This will save money as it will allow two classes to be taught at the same time.

 

Catalogue Description:

(See attached Status Sheet)

 

Prerequisites:  Engl 323, Junior Standing, Instructor Approval

 

This course provides students the opportunity to develop their interests and talents creative writing by engaging them intensely in a particular genre of creative writing. Genres include the short story, the novel, and play writing. May be repeated for credit.

 

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

____________________________________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


 

CURRICULUM CHANGE FORM

PROPOSAL FOR DEGREE CHANGE:

New_______xx___________

Revised_______________

Deleted_______________

 

Course:  Engl 493 Scholarly Project

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

We would like to provide an opportunity for students to explore individual areas of interest.

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

None

 

Catalogue Description:

 

Prerequisites:  Engl 113, Senior Standing, Instructor Approval

 

English and Communication Studies majors engaged in a scholarly project have opportunities to explore various areas of interest. Students who are interested in doing a scholarly project are requested to contact full-time faculty in the Humanities and Social Science Department. Instructor and student will collaborate in organizing a scholarly project in the field-of-interest of the latter.

 

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

____________________________________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Degree change

 

_____New

_X__Revised

 

Course Title or Degree Title

BA in English and Communication Studies (with or without Lakota Studies Minor)

 

Statement of Need and Purposes

Modification of status sheet to combine options with and without Lakota Studies Minor, to ensure compliance with requirements on p. 27 of 2010-11 catalog.

College Requirements Affected

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues

None

 

Catalogue Description

 

List of changes:

1.                                                                                                                                                                         Combined status sheets so that there is one degree with or without a Lakota Studies minor

2.                                                                                                                                                                        Changed the OLC core area so that it reflects what the OLC core actually is, and opened it up so students can use any of the core classes to fill this area.

3.                                                                                                                                                                        Changed the name of part III to professional requirements and added Lit 203 to that area so that students can still take art or humanities in the humanities elective area.

4.                                                                                                                                                                        Took away one free elective.

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalog description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 


 

OLD STATUS SHEETS

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

BA in English and Communication Studies (Without Minor)

 

I. Core (27 credits)                                                     Where Taken Date Grade

Eng 103* Freshman English I                                     3__________________________

Eng 113* Freshman English II                                   3__________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communications                           3__________________________

Math 103 Elementary Algebra                                    3__________________________

MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                  3__________________________

Hum Elec Any Music, Art, or Hum Course               3__________________________

Lit 203* Introduction to Literature                            3__________________________

Science Elective                                                          3__________________________

Soc 103* Introduction to Social Science

                                    OR

Psy 103* General Psychology                                    3__________________________

 

II. Lakota Studies Core (15 credits)

Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                       3__________________________

Lak 223* Lakota Language II                                    3__________________________

LSoc 103, LHist 203, or LHist 213                           3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                                           3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                                           3__________________________

 

III. English and Communication Studies Major (36 credits) – C grade minimum in the Major. Note that students who plan to pursue Secondary Certification must have a 2.5 GPA in the Major.)

 

a. English and Communication Studies Core – 18 credits

Engl 223 Advanced Composition I                                  3_______________________

Engl 233 The Joy of Writing                                            3_______________________

Lit 243 Minority Literature                                               3_______________________

Lit 223 American Literature to 1865                                3_______________________

SpCm 223 Multicultural Communication                         3_______________________

SpCm 233 Elements of Human Communication              3_______________________

b. Advanced offerings – Choose 18 upper division credits from upper division English, Literature, or Speech Communication courses offered by the Humanities and Social Sciences Department.

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

 

V. Electives (33 credits) – Students are encouraged to pursue personal interests and take courses in that area.

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

 

Total: 112 credit hours including a minimum of 36 at 300 level or above

 


HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

BA English and Communication Studies (With Lakota Studies Minor)

 

I. Core (27 credits)                                                     Where Taken Date Grade

Eng 103* Freshman English I                                     3__________________________

Eng 113* Freshman English II                                   3__________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communications                           3__________________________

Math 103 Elementary Algebra                                    3__________________________

MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                  3__________________________

Hum Elec Any Music, Art, or Hum Course               3__________________________

Lit 203* Introduction to Literature                            3__________________________

Science Elective                                                          3__________________________

Soc 103* Introduction to Social Science

                                    OR

Psy 103* General Psychology                                    3__________________________

 

II. Lakota Studies Core (15 credits)

Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                       3__________________________

Lak 223* Lakota Language II                                    3__________________________

LSoc 103, LHist 203, or LHist 213                           3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                                           3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                                           3__________________________

 

III. English and Communication Studies Major (36 credits) – C grade minimum in the Major. Note that students who plan to pursue Secondary Certification must have a 2.5 GPA in the Major.)

 

 

b. English and Communication Studies Core – 18 credits

Engl 223 Advanced Composition I                                  3_______________________

Engl 233 The Joy of Writing                                            3_______________________

Lit 243 Minority Literature                                               3_______________________

Lit 223 American Literature to 1865                                3_______________________

SpCm 223 Multicultural Communication                         3_______________________

SpCm 233 Elements of Human Communication              3_______________________

b. Advanced offerings – Choose 18 upper division credits from upper division English, Literature, or Speech Communication courses offered by the Humanities and Social Sciences Department.

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

 

IV. Lakota Studies Minor (6 credits in addition to Section II above)

Lakota Studies Core (Section II above PLUS the following two courses)

Lak 323* Lakota Language III                                  3__________________________

Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                                  3__________________________

 

V. Electives (27 credits) – Students are encouraged to pursue personal interests and take courses in that area.

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

 

Total: 112 credit hours including a minimum of 36 at 300 level or above


 

NEW STATUS SHEET

 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

BA in English and Communication Studies

 

I. Core (24 credits)                                                     Where Taken Date Grade

Eng 103* Freshman English I                         3__________________________

Eng 113* Freshman English II                       3__________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communications               3__________________________

Math 103 Elementary Algebra                        3__________________________

MIS 113 Applied Information Processing      3__________________________

Humanities Elective                                        3__________________________

Science Elective                                              3__________________________

Social Science Elective                                   3__________________________

 

II. Lakota Studies Core (15 credits)

Lak 103 Lakota Language I                           3__________________________

Lak 223* Lakota Language II                        3__________________________

LSoc 103, LHist 203, or LHist 213               3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                               3__________________________

Lakota Elective                                               3__________________________

 

III. Professional Requirements (42 credits)

Hum 203 Intro to Phil and Critical Thinking  3__________________________

Engl 223 Advanced Composition I                3__________________________

Engl 233 The Joy of Writing                          3__________________________

Lit 203 Introduction to Literature                  3__________________________

Lit 243 Minority Literature                             3__________________________

Lit 223 American Literature to 1865              3__________________________

SpCm 223 Multicultural Communication       3__________________________

SpCm 233 Elements of Human Comm Sk     3__________________________

 

English and Communication Electives:  Choose 18 upper division credits from English, Literature, or Speech Communication courses offered by the Humanities and Social Sciences Department.

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

_____________________________________    3__________________________

 

V. Free Electives (30 credits) – Students are encouraged to pursue personal interests and take courses in that area.

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

_____________________________________          3__________________________

 

 

Total: 112 credit hours including a minimum of 36 at 300 level or above

 

 

Lakota Studies Minor (Section II above PLUS the following two courses)  Students can also choose to pursue a minor in Lakota Studies by taking Lak 323 and 423 in place of two elective classes.

Lak 323* Lakota Language III                      3__________________________

Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                      3__________________________

 

 


Oglala Lakota College

Advanced Comp I (Eng 283) Course Syllabus

 

Instructor Information

Ÿ  Home Phone:  (605) 867-2762

Ÿ  Work Phone:  (605) 455-6000

Ÿ  E-Mail:  khecrow@olc.edu

 

Course Description

A course which helps students learn to write persuasive and argumentative papers. This course helps students further develop researching, interviewing and reporting skills.

 

Course Objectives

 

Required Texts

Mayberry, Katherine.  Everyday Arguments: A Guide to Writing and Reading Effective Arguments. 3rd Ed. Boston:  Houghton Mifflin Company, 2009.

 

Lakota Perspective

Lakota perspective is provided through reading and writing topics. Student writing and discussion will supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

 


General Requirements

  1. Check in and turn in assignments every single week (This is how attendance is calculated).
  2. Read assigned material.
  3. Turn in work on time.
  4. Participate in discussions.
  5. If you have questions, you can either email me or you can call me.

 

Attendance Policy

  1. Because student success in college is largely dependent on attending class, students are expected to log into moodle and turn in work EVERY week. Attendance will be based upon submission of assignments, not just on logging in.
  2. There is no such thing as an ‘excused’ absence.
  3. Students will be dropped after three absences in a row (after three weeks of not turning in work) or after five scattered absences (five scattered weeks of not turning in work).

 

Workload

  1. Every week, students will complete:
    1. Chapter Reading and Activities
    2. Reading from end of book and reading response
    3. Quibbles
  2. Students will also complete other discussion questions
  3. Students will write six papers

 

Evaluation

Chapter Readings and Activities

20%

Reading Responses to Textbook Reading Selections

10%

Quibbles and Other Discussion Questions

20%

Papers

50%

TOTAL

100%

 

**It is the student¹s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and assignments in case of a grade dispute.

The following scale is used in determining averages:

       A 94-100

       B 88-93

       C 82-87

       D 76-81

       F Below 75

 


Late Assignments:

All weekly assignments will be made available on Friday and students will have until the next Friday to complete the assignments for full credit. Assignments that are handed in late will receive a reduction in points.  Discussion Room and Turn In Link accessibility will be gone one week after the due date. For example, if a weekly assignment is due on Friday January 30th, students will be able to turn in work through midnight on January 30th for full credit, but after midnight on February 6th they will no longer be allowed to complete that weekly assignment.

 

Course Evaluation:

I expect students to complete the electronic instructor evaluation via OLC’s online Perseus program. Ideally, this activity will be completed during weeks thirteen or fourteen of the semester. The College Center Counselor can assist you. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

 

Reading Responses

A reading response should be at least two paragraphs long, though they may certainly be longer. Reading responses are assigned throughout the semester for textbook reading selections.

All reading responses will be graded on a 10-point scale. A reading response does more than merely summarize the reading. If it does, you will receive (at most) 5 points. A reading response is a piece of writing in which students go beyond a summary to say something significant, or interesting, or at least reasonable. I want to see that you are thinking and applying the ideas from the readings. Agree or disagree with the author (and tell me why), apply the ideas mentioned in a different situation, relate the reading’s main idea to a personal experience or belief, or discuss the main idea in some other context—but do not merely summarize.

 

Quibbles

What is a quibble?  A quibble is like a journal. I assign a topic and the student responds to that topic in an argumentative or persuasive entry, like a journal. All students can feel free to respond to these topics according to their beliefs. Other students can respond to these quibbles, but they may NOT attack another student for what they believe in. The quibble is a chance to practice arguing and persuading in a non-threatening atmosphere. These will be graded only according to development of thoughts. I will not grade grammar or mechanics on quibbles. Each quibble should be at least two or three paragraphs, or more if you wish.

 


Document Preparation

ü  There are two forms of paper submission in this class. One is through discussion rooms and the other is through paper assignment turn in links. I do not want work emailed to me. We will use moodle for turning in work. If you have problems with moodle at some point, you can email me your work to get credit for being on time, but you will still need to submit this work in moodle also.

ü  Discussion Room Posting

ü  You can type the assignment in word, then copy and paste it into the discussion room for the week. You can also type your response directly into the discussion room, but I would not suggest this. Sometimes computers lose the connection and then everything you type could be lost.

ü  All discussion room posts are graded on development of thoughts and ideas, not grammar or mechanics.

ü  Reading Responses, Quibbles and other discussion topics will be turned in via discussion room.

ü  Paper Assignment Turn In Links

ü  All formal papers will be turned in through a turn in link which will be available in that weeks block.  See the next section for directions to use turn in links.

ü  Formal papers are to be typed and double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged”. Use 12 pt Times or Times New Roman font.

ü  When saving papers electronically, name the file with your first initial, last name, assignment and draft number. Example: “kbettelyoun Argument paper 1 draft 1”

ü  First Drafts of papers will not be “graded” in the traditional sense. They will be evaluated and have general comments written on them (i.e., excellent, very good, average, not passing), but they will not receive a letter grade. You have the opportunity to revise each paper so that it will be representative of your best work. I strongly encourage revision. Revision is an integral part to the writing process and should not be neglected. Revision should take place throughout the semester, not during the last two weeks.

ü  Papers are graded using the OLC writing rubric.

 

Directions……..To Turn in work via Turn In Link

To turn in papers, use the following directions:

1.      Open a word document

2.      Save it on your computer. Make sure you can find it.

3.      In Moodle, under the paper assignment link there is a link with the assignment name and Turn In Link – Click this link

a.       Example……. “Argument Paper 1 Turn In Link”

4.      Click Browse

5.      Find the paper on your computer ---click on the file name, then click open

6.      Click upload this file

7.      Click Continue

Done J

 


Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current college catalog states

Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty. (10)

The Humanities and Social Science department fully supports this policy. Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources that are now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation. You are expected to do your own work. If you are unsure about the proper documentation of someone else’s words and/or ideas, ask me. Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. Plagiarism will result in an F for the course.


OLC Writing Rubric

The thesis sentence indicates a topic and expresses direction.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The introduction grabs the reader’s attention and introduces the topic.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The body involves information that is developed and supported in topic sentences.  Paragraphs support the thesis.  The evidence is necessary and relevant and contains a balance of both generalities and specifics (details, anecdotes, statistics, etc.)  Claims are supported rationally or empirically.  Transitions are used to signal organization within a paragraph and/or between paragraphs.  The essay is well organized and reads smoothly from beginning to end.  The information is focused and apparent digressions connect with the thesis.  The approach to the topic is interesting, demonstrates an air of inquiry, challenges what someone says or writes, and makes an evaluation.  When readings and presentations are used, they are evaluated analyzed, and interpreted and not merely summarized.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The conclusion creates a feeling of closure.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Style:  word choices are appropriate and effective for purpose and audience.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Language Use and Correctness in sentences is clear, coherent and varied.  Writing adheres to the conventions of edited English in mechanics, grammar, and spelling.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

 

Overall Score:  _______________

4=A= Excellent, full of very good ideas, but not necessarily perfect 

3.5=B= Pretty good to very good, has some minor errors 

3.0=C= Average, okay, fulfills the assignment, minor to major errors 

2.5=D= Not on track, lacks focus, numerous errors 

2.0=F=Misses the boat, lacks a coherent focus, full of grievous errors

Weekly Assignments

Note:  Activities for each chapter, discussion posts and Reading Assignments will be specified in each weekly assignment sheet.

Week

#

Chapter Assignment

Formal Writing

Assignments

1

 

 

2

Chapter 1

 

3

Chapter 2

 

4

Chapter 3

Argument Paper 1

5

Chapter 4

 

6

Chapter 5

Argument Paper 2

7

Chapter 6

Argument Paper 3 Other Side

8

Chapter 7

 

9

Chapter 8

Literary Analysis

10

Chapter 9

 

11

Chapter 10

Persuasive Paper

12

Chapter 11

 

13

Chapter 12

 

14

Chapter 13

Argument or Persuasive Paper

15

 

Revisions

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer

Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 


 

Oglala Lakota College

Course Syllabus

Power of the Story

Eng 333

Instructor Information:

Ÿ  Kimberly Bettelyoun - He Crow

Ÿ  Home Phone:  (605) 867-2762

Ÿ  Work Phone:  (605) 455-6000

Ÿ  E-Mail:  khecrow@olc.edu

 

Catalog Course Description:  This course is for those who want to learn the basics of writing a vivid and engaging story. It covers the craft of writing. Topics include character development, plot, setting, point of view, dialogue and self-editing. Students will have the opportunity to work in a variety of genres.

 

 

Required Text: 

Trickster Tales:  Forty Folk Stories from Around the World by Josepha Sherman

 

Supplementary Material:  Handouts supplied by instructor.

 

Course Objectives:

1.     By the end of this course, students will analyze several creation stories, mythological stories, and other stories, such as trickster stories.

2.     By the end of this course, students will research, interview and collaborate to gain knowledge of stories and storytelling.

3.     By the end of this course, students will translate their knowledge of stories to create their own stories.

 

Course Requirements:

  1. Weekly reading
  2. Weekly Discussion Questions
  3. Misc Activities & Assignments
  4. Analysis Papers
  5. Research Report
  6. Submission of Stories written or told by Others
  7. Submission of Stories written by the Student

 

Lakota Perspective:  The Lakota perspective is enhanced in this course by the use of Lakota stories, either brought in by the instructor or by the student.

 

Evaluation:

Stories written by the student                          30%

Stories written or told by others                                   20%

Misc Activities & Assignments                                       20%

Discussion Questions                                                    10%

Analysis Papers                                                             10%

Research Report                                                           10%

                                   

The following scale is used in determining averages:

       A 94-100

       B 88-93

       C 82-87

       D 76-81

       F Below 75

 

Late Assignments:  Assignments that are handed in late will receive a reduction in points.  Assignments that exceed two (2) class periods after due date will not be accepted. All assigned work in the first half of the class (8 weeks) must be completed by midterm; missing assignments will result in a zero for that assignment.

 

Document Preparation:

Essays are to be double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged”. Use 12 pt Times or Times New Roman font.

 

Academic Honesty:

You are expected to do your own work. Plagiarism can result in failing this class. If you are unsure about the proper documentation of someone else’s words and/or ideas, ask me. Plagiarism is using another’s writing as your own. It could mean copying from a book or article and/or copying from someone else’s ideas or opinions without citing the source. Taking someone else’s paper and putting your name on it is also plagiarism. Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. Plagiarism will result in an F for the course.

 

Attendance Policy:

1.     Current college policy states:  Three absences in a row and a student may be dropped. Five absences and/or fifteen hours scattered throughout the course constitutes an automatic drop from the course.

2.     Because this is an online course attendance will be taken based on submission or work. There will be weekly assignments and attendance will be based upon submission of those assignments.

 


Course Evaluation

I expect students to complete the electronic instructor evaluation via OLC’s online Perseus program. Ideally, this activity will be completed during weeks thirteen or fourteen of the semester. The College Center Counselor will assist you. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

 

NOTE:  Change is our constant companion and as a consequence of unforeseen circumstances the following disclaimer is provided:  Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed at the beginning of the semester.  However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right, acting within the policies and procedures of OLC, to make changes in course content or instructional technique without notice or obligation.

 

Handy Advice

Ask for help! If you need help with any assignment or have questions about readings, contact me. J 

Have a great semester!

 

Directions……..To Turn in work……..

To turn in papers, use the following directions:

8.      Open a word document

9.      Save it on your computer. Make sure you can find it.

10.  In Moodle, under the paper assignment link there is a link with the assignment name and Turn In Link – Click this link

b.      Example……. “Story 1 Turn In Link”

11.  Click Browse

12.  Find the paper on your computer ---click on the test file name, then click open

13.  Click upload this file

14.  Click Continue

Done J

 


Eng 333 Schedule

 

Week 1

Syllabus

Bio

Forum Post --- Types of Stories

Questionnaire

Childhood Story

Week 2

Intro to Stories

Week 3

Ghost Story

Week 4

Funny Story/Fairy Tale

Week 5

Creation Stories

Week 6

Creation Stories

Week 7

Parable/Fable

Week 8

Trickster Story

Week 9

Trickster Story

Week 10

Trickster Story

Week 11

Mythology

Week 12

Mythology

Week 13

Other Stories

Week 14

Research Report

Week 15

Goodbye Story

 

 


 

Oglala Lakota College

olclogo1

Eng 483   Advanced Comp II

Course Syllabus

 

Center:__________  Day and Section Number:  __________

 

 

Instructor Information

Instructor Name

Kimberly Bettelyoun - He Crow

Home Phone

605-867-1624

Office Phone

605-455-6093

Email Address

khecrow@olc.edu  (I will respond to all email correspondence within 24 hours, except on weekends)

Office Hours

My office hours are one hour before or one hour after class.  I can also meet with students (by appointment) on Mondays or Fridays at Piya Wiconi. If these times don’t work, I am also open to schedule another appointment time.  Contact me to set up an appointment.

 

I also maintain an electronic presence during the day each week day.  I am in moodle, checking OLC email and I am on facebook (feel free to add me as a friend).

 


 

Course Information

 

Course Description

This course guides you toward more sophisticated and broad research strategies, and stylistic choices that are more varied and creative. Incorporating critical reading skills, this course instructs you to use reading to negotiate with the ideas of others, form your own opinions, and enlarge your own repertoires of rhetorical strategies. This course will prepare you to communicate effectively, ethically, responsibly, and professionally and will provide you with skills, strategies, and conceptual knowledge to help you address a variety of communication tasks.

 

New Prerequisites:  Engl 283, Junior Standing, and Instructor Approval

 

Course Objectives

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

·        Write for multiple audiences and purposes—making appropriate decisions about content, rhetoric, structure, vocabulary, style, and presentation.

·        Create individualized strategies for generating topics, developing and organizing ideas, reviewing and revising drafts, and editing and proofreading a polished product.

·        Read print and electronic sources critically to identify an author’s argumentative strategies and stylistic techniques.

·        Use advanced search techniques in databases and Internet search engines to locate scholarly articles, books, and web pages.

·        Integrate sources with our own ideas, avoid plagiarism, and document sources correctly in a prescribed format.

·        Experiment with more sophisticated rhetorical strategies and stylistic techniques.

·        Write more comfortably within the rules and conventions of Standard Written American English.

 

Required Texts & Materials

·        Jump Drive

·        TBA Text

 

Instructional Methodology

Instruction of this class is accomplished through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and physical involvement by the student.  Students will read chapters and handouts that pertain to the objectives pertinent to the assignment. Students will then complete assignments with assistance as needed from the instructor and classmates.

 

Work Expectations

Students will complete reading and writing assignments in class. Many of these in class assignments cannot be made up later. Additionally, students will be assigned reading and writing assignments to be completed outside of class time. Failing to complete homework assignments will affect final grades.

 

Evaluation

Reading Responses

15%

Summaries

5%

Daily Grade

5%

Portfolio (4 papers)

75%

**It is the student¹s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Letter Grades and their Meanings for the Portfolio:

A= Excellent, full of very good ideas, but not necessarily perfect 

B= Pretty good to very good, has some minor errors 

C= Average, okay, fulfills the assignment, minor to major errors 

D= Not on track, lacks focus, numerous errors 

F=Misses the boat, lacks a coherent focus, full of grievous errors

 

Grading Scale

The following scale is used in determining averages:

100-90        A

89-80          B

79-70          C

69-60          D

59-0            F

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Course Evaluation

I expect students to complete the course evaluation. Ideally, this activity will be completed during weeks thirteen or fourteen of the semester. The College Center Counselor will assist you. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

 

Lakota Perspective

·        The Lakota perspective is encouraged in this course. In fact, writing exercises and threaded discussion continually supplies a Lakota perspective on many topics considered in class.

·        Wolakolkiciyapi. Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage.

·        Recommendations will be made to incorporate cultural themes and issues in papers and/or presentations.


English 483 Schedule

Week 1

¨  Go over Syllabus

¨  Introductions

¨  Pretest

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 2

¨  Topic Covered – Plagiarism & Planning, Outlining and Writing the Paper

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 3

¨  Topic Covered –Finding and Using Sources

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 4

¨  Topic Covered --

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 5

¨  Topic Covered –

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 6-11

¨  Topic Covered –

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 12

¨  Topic Covered –

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 13-14

¨  Work on  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 15

¨  Final Paper

¨  Final Reflection

¨  Celebration

 


Course Policies

 

Attendance Policy

This is a skills course--not a lecture course where you can borrow a friend’s notes afterward. Typically, one or more skills will be explained briefly in class, and you will then spend most of the class time practicing the skills, making them your own. You will be learning in the best possible way, through doing. Since much of the value and meaning of the course is the work done in class, you must be here on a steady basis. In a real sense, if you miss class, you are missing the course. Therefore, you should determine now to attend class faithfully; otherwise, you will be wasting your time and money.

 

Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.

 

The following attendance policy will be followed:

·        Three (3) absences in a row (without face to face, electronic or phone communication) constitute an automatic drop. Leaving a message at the center is NOT adequate communication.

·        Five (5) scattered absences constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).

·        There will be no such thing as an excused absence. All absences are documented in the same way, as absent unexcused. Save your allowed absences for emergencies.

·        Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded. You must be present for at least ½ of the class to be marked present in jenzabar.

 

Withdrawal

Students who are dropped from a class either by me or by the registrar will NOT be reinstated. There are NO reinstatements for students who are dropped for five absences.

 

Communication is essential. If you are having difficulties and are in danger of being dropped, contact me asap to discuss options BEFORE you are dropped.

 

You should also be aware that withdrawals (drops) will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.

 

Incomplete and Grade Change

There must be a valid reason to request a grade change or an incomplete.  An incomplete grade or grade change is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.

 

Not getting work done on time, missing class, being tardy or leaving early are NOT valid reasons for incompletes or grade changes.

 

Late Work

Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation. Missing class does not excuse a student from having work done at the next class.

·        Assignments may be submitted by email through Friday of the week due for full credit.

·        Assignments submitted late (after Friday) will be reduced by one letter grade.

·        Assignments more than one week late will not be accepted.

 

Academic Integrity

Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current college catalog states

Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty. (10)

The Humanities and Social Science department fully supports this policy. Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author.

 

Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources that are now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation.

 

You are expected to do your own work. If you are unsure about the proper documentation of someone else’s words and/or ideas, ask me. Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. Plagiarism will result in an F for the course.

 

Academic Freedom in Learning

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.

 

Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

 

Student Conduct

OLC students will abide by the standards of conduct stated in the latest student handbook. Every student has the right to a safe learning environment.  OLC applies the following as acts of misconduct subject to disciplinary action: Any actual or threatened physical violence; Gross disorderly conduct;  Verbal  abuse or harassment;  Vandalism;  Attending classes under the influence of alcohol or drugs; and any other student conduct that causes a disruption in the classroom.  Any infringement of these rules could lead to dismissal.

 

Please respect your classmates and your instructor by refraining from the following in class, except where authorized as part of an assignment:

·        Visiting with classmates

·        Surfing the Internet

·        Checking or sending e-mail

·        Making or answering phone calls

·        Texting

 

 

ADA Statement      (American Disabilities Act)

This class requires extensive reading and writing.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any activities, please talk to the Instructor. 

 

If you have a disability that interferes with your ability to learn and in need of assistance please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.  See OLC Policy 85-600 for further details.

 

Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs. If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.


Additional Information

 

Document Preparation

ü Word processing is required for all papers. Papers are to be typed and double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged”. Use 12 pt Times or Times New Roman font. Papers should also be submitted via e-mail. Assistance will be provided in class.

ü When saving papers electronically, name the file with your first initial, last name, assignment name and draft number. Example: “kbettelyoun research paper draft 1”

ü For handwritten assignments, use blue or black ink on only one side of the paper. Cut off all ragged edges. All papers must be stapled or paper-clipped together.

ü Each time you turn in a paper, you will turn in the final copy along with all copies of all previous drafts. To begin with, this paper will not be “graded” in the traditional sense. It will be evaluated and have general comments written on it (i.e., excellent, very good, average, not passing), but it will not receive a letter grade. You have the opportunity to revise the paper so that it will be representative of your best work. I strongly encourage revision. Revision is an integral part to the writing process and should not be neglected. Revision should take place throughout the semester, not during the last two weeks.  Papers that have been revised will then be given a letter grade.

 

Freewrites

ü I generally start each class with a short, 5-10 minute freewrite. This is how I will take attendance. If you miss the freewrite, you are counted absent. This also counts towards your daily grade.

 

Reading Responses

ü A reading response should be at least 300 words (1 ½ pages), though they may certainly be longer. They must be typed. Reading responses are assigned throughout the semester for specific readings—check your daily schedule for due dates. These will help me see how you are faring with the readings, as well as help me get to know you as a writer. All reading responses will be graded on a 10-point scale.

ü A reading response does more than merely summarize the reading. If it does, you will receive (at most) 5 points. A reading response is a piece of writing in which students go beyond a summary to say something significant, or interesting, or at least reasonable. I want to see that you are thinking and applying the ideas from the readings. Agree or disagree with the author (and tell me why), apply the ideas mentioned in a different situation, relate the reading’s main idea to a personal experience or belief, or discuss the main idea in some other context—but do not merely summarize.

 

Summaries

ü A summary should concisely restate key ideas in your own words. You may include quotes, though you should be sure they are important and you document them correctly. The key is to find the key idea—the central argument—and tell me what that is in your own words. Also tell me how the author backs that argument up; what support is offered? A summary should be about 250 words.

 

The Portfolio System

ü Each time you turn in an essay, you will turn in the final copy along with all copies of all previous drafts in a 2-pocket folder. This essay will not be “graded” in the traditional sense. It will be evaluated and had general comments written on it (i.e., excellent, very good, average, not passing), but it will not receive a letter grade. You have the opportunity to revise each essay as many times as you like so that it will be representative of your best work, until it is time to turn it in for final grading at the end of the semester. I strongly encourage revision. Revision is an integral part to the writing process and should not be neglected. Should you decide to revise, I would also suggest you make an effort to conference with me during office hours about the revisions you intend. Revision should take place throughout the semester, not during the last two weeks on it.

ü When the final portfolio is turned in for evaluation at the end of the semester, it will receive a letter grade. Save all of your work for each essay during the semester to include it in the final portfolio. Incomplete portfolios lose points during evaluation.


 

Oglala Lakota College

Course Syllabus

Advanced Creative Writing

Engl 423

Instructor Information

Ÿ  Home Phone:  (605) 867-1624

Ÿ  Work Phone:  (605) 455-6000

Ÿ  E-Mail:  khecrow@olc.edu

 

Course Description:

This course provides students the opportunity to develop their interests and talents creative writing by engaging them intensely in a particular genre of creative writing. Genres include the short story, the novel, and play writing. May be repeated for credit.

 

Course Objectives

1. Students will learn the elements of on genre of fiction in detail, and will produce a longer piece of writing.

 

Required Texts:

ü  Schaefer, Candace and Rick Diamond. The Creative Writing Guide. New York:  Longman, 1998.

ü  Access to Moodle and OLC email

 

Attendance Policy:

1.     Current college policy states:  Three absences in a row and a student may be dropped. Five absences and/or fifteen hours scattered throughout the course constitutes an automatic drop from the course.

2.    In my class:

a.    There will be no such thing as an ‘excused’ absence.

b.    Three(3) absences in a row constitutes an automatic drop.

c.    Five (5) scattered excused or unexcused absences constitute an automatic drop.

d.    If you are dropped, I will NOT add you back in so please do not ask.

3.    You must enter the class and turn in work at least once a week

4.    Attendance is based upon submission of work

a.    If you do not turn in work, you are marked absent

b.    If you turn work in more than two days past the due date, you are marked absent, even if the work is eventually turned in!  I will not change attendance, so if you consistently turn work in late, you will be dropped even if you are caught up in the class at that point.

c.    You can work ahead.  I will try to keep the weekly assignments open a week ahead most of the time.

d.    Assignment links and forums will only be open two weeks, so MAKE SURE you get in the moodle classroom and do your work on time, or early.

e.    Monitor Your Own Attendance!!!!!!  Go to:  http://exweb.olc.edu/ICS   You can check your own attendance here.

5.    You should also be aware that drops will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.

 

Lakota Perspective

 

Assignments:

o   Forum Posts. Students will participate in forums by answering discussion questions and by responding to writing prompts.

o   Memoir. A story written by you about your life

o   Fiction.  Narrative or story, some short and one longer piece

o   Poetry.  Various types

o   Drama.  A short play

 

Evaluation

The final grade will be determined in the following way:

Section 1                                  200 Points

Section 2                                  200 Points

Section 3                                  200 Points

Section 4                                  200 Points

Final Piece                                 200 Points

                                                1000 Points

Grading Scale

The following scale is used in determining averages:

       A 94-100   B 88-93   C 82-87   D 76-81   F Below 75

LATE  PAPERS:  Late Papers will receive two grades:

1.         The grade the work actually deserves.

2.        The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

GRADE CHANGES AND INCOMPLETES:  There must be a valid reason to request a grade change or an incomplete.  Not getting work done on time is not a valid reason.

Course Evaluation

I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation during weeks thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

 

Document Preparation

ü  Papers are to be double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged”. Use 12 pt Times or Times New Roman font.

ü  When saving papers electronically, name the file with your first initial, last name, assignment and draft number. Example: “kbettelyoun news story 1”

 

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current college catalog states

Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty. (10)

The Humanities and Social Science department fully supports this policy. Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources that are now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation. You are expected to do your own work. If you are unsure about the proper documentation of someone else’s words and/or ideas, ask me. Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. Plagiarism will result in an F for the course.

 

Disability Information

If you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.

 

Disclaimer

Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

English 323 Schedule

The schedule for this class is determined on an individual basis.

 

 

 


 

Oglala Lakota College

olclogo1

Engl 493 Scholarly Project

Course Syllabus

 

Center:__________  Day and Section Number:  __________

 

 

Instructor Information

Instructor Name

Kimberly Bettelyoun - He Crow

Home Phone

605-867-1624

Office Phone

605-455-6093

Email Address

khecrow@olc.edu  (I will respond to all email correspondence within 24 hours, except on weekends)

Office Hours

My office hours are one hour before or one hour after class.  I can also meet with students (by appointment) on Mondays or Fridays at Piya Wiconi. If these times don’t work, I am also open to schedule another appointment time.  Contact me to set up an appointment.

 

I also maintain an electronic presence during the day each week day.  I am in moodle, checking OLC email and I am on facebook (feel free to add me as a friend).

 


Course Information

 

Course Description:

English and Communication Studies majors engaged in a scholarly project have opportunities to explore various areas of interest. Students who are interested in doing a scholarly project are requested to contact full-time faculty in the Humanities and Social Science Department. Instructor and student will collaborate in organizing a scholarly project in the field-of-interest of the latter.

 

Prerequisites:  Engl 113, Senior Standing, Instructor Approval

 

Course Objectives:

1.     Learn about a chosen area of English, Literature or Speech Communications

2.     Be able to provide an interpretation of the scholarly project

3.     Prepare a presentation of project

 

 

Required Text and Materials

ü Jump Drive

 

Instructional Methodology

During the semester the student and faculty member assigned to the student must meet at least three times and must document each meeting in writing.  The documentation will be maintained by the full-time faculty member assigned to work with the student during the scholarly project.

 

Work Expectations

Students will complete a major scholarly project. The student will spend much of this time working independently.

 

Evaluation:

1.     Written midterm and final papers. 

2.     Written paper and/or oral presentation to faculty and students

3.     Written presentation to be submitted at the end of the semester.

 

 

 

Grading Scale

The following scale is used in determining averages:

100-90        A

89-80          B

79-70          C

69-60          D

59-0            F

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Course Evaluation

I expect students to complete the course evaluation. Ideally, this activity will be completed during weeks thirteen or fourteen of the semester. The College Center Counselor will assist you. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

 

Lakota Perspective

·        The Lakota perspective is encouraged in this course. In fact, writing exercises and threaded discussion continually supplies a Lakota perspective on many topics considered in class.

·        Wolakolkiciyapi. Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage.

·        Recommendations will be made to incorporate cultural themes and issues in papers and/or presentations.


 Course Policies

 

Attendance Policy

This is a skills course--not a lecture course where you can borrow a friend’s notes afterward. Typically, one or more skills will be explained briefly in class, and you will then spend most of the class time practicing the skills, making them your own. You will be learning in the best possible way, through doing. Since much of the value and meaning of the course is the work done in class, you must be here on a steady basis. In a real sense, if you miss class, you are missing the course. Therefore, you should determine now to attend class faithfully; otherwise, you will be wasting your time and money.

 

Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.

 

The following attendance policy will be followed:

·        Three (3) absences in a row (without face to face, electronic or phone communication) constitute an automatic drop. Leaving a message at the center is NOT adequate communication.

·        Five (5) scattered absences constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).

·        There will be no such thing as an excused absence. All absences are documented in the same way, as absent unexcused. Save your allowed absences for emergencies.

·        Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded. You must be present for at least ½ of the class to be marked present in jenzabar.

 

Withdrawal

Students who are dropped from a class either by me or by the registrar will NOT be reinstated. There are NO reinstatements for students who are dropped for five absences.

 

Communication is essential. If you are having difficulties and are in danger of being dropped, contact me asap to discuss options BEFORE you are dropped.

 

You should also be aware that withdrawals (drops) will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.

 

Incomplete and Grade Change

There must be a valid reason to request a grade change or an incomplete.  An incomplete grade or grade change is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.

 

Not getting work done on time, missing class, being tardy or leaving early are NOT valid reasons for incompletes or grade changes.

 

Late Work

Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation. Missing class does not excuse a student from having work done at the next class.

·        Assignments may be submitted by email through Friday of the week due for full credit.

·        Assignments submitted late (after Friday) will be reduced by one letter grade.

·        Assignments more than one week late will not be accepted.

 

Academic Integrity

Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current college catalog states

Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty. (10)

The Humanities and Social Science department fully supports this policy. Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author.

 

Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources that are now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation.

 

You are expected to do your own work. If you are unsure about the proper documentation of someone else’s words and/or ideas, ask me. Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class. Plagiarism will result in an F for the course.

 

Academic Freedom in Learning

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.

 

Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

 

Student Conduct

OLC students will abide by the standards of conduct stated in the latest student handbook. Every student has the right to a safe learning environment.  OLC applies the following as acts of misconduct subject to disciplinary action: Any actual or threatened physical violence; Gross disorderly conduct;  Verbal  abuse or harassment;  Vandalism;  Attending classes under the influence of alcohol or drugs; and any other student conduct that causes a disruption in the classroom.  Any infringement of these rules could lead to dismissal.

 

ADA Statement      (American Disabilities Act)

This class requires extensive reading and writing.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any activities, please talk to the Instructor. 

 

If you have a disability that interferes with your ability to learn and in need of assistance please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.  See OLC Policy 85-600 for further details.

 

Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs. If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

 

Disclaimer

Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 


Additional Information

 

Document Preparation

ü Word processing is required for all papers. Papers are to be typed and double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged”. Use 12 pt Times or Times New Roman font. Papers should also be submitted via e-mail. Assistance will be provided in class.

ü When saving papers electronically, name the file with your first initial, last name, assignment name and draft number. Example: “kbettelyoun definition paper draft 1”

ü For handwritten assignments, use blue or black ink on only one side of the paper. Cut off all ragged edges. All papers must be stapled or paper-clipped together.

ü Each time you turn in an essay, you will turn in the final copy along with all copies of all previous drafts. This essay will not be “graded” in the traditional sense. It will be evaluated and have general comments written on it (i.e., excellent, very good, average, not passing), but it will not receive a letter grade. You have the opportunity to revise each essay so that it will be representative of your best work. I strongly encourage revision. Revision is an integral part to the writing process and should not be neglected. Revision should take place throughout the semester, not during the last two weeks.

 


Writing Rubric

The thesis sentence indicates a topic and expresses direction.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

The introduction grabs the reader’s attention and introduces the topic.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

The body involves information that is developed and supported in topic sentences.  Paragraphs support the thesis.  The evidence is necessary and relevant and contains a balance of both generalities and specifics (details, anecdotes, statistics, etc.)  Claims are supported rationally or empirically.  Transitions are used to signal organization within a paragraph and/or between paragraphs.  The essay is well organized and reads smoothly from beginning to end.  The information is focused and apparent digressions connect with the thesis.  The approach to the topic is interesting, demonstrates an air of inquiry, challenges what someone says or writes, and makes an evaluation.  When readings and presentations are used, they are evaluated analyzed, and interpreted and not merely summarized.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

The conclusion creates a feeling of closure.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

Style:  word choices are appropriate and effective for purpose and audience.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

Language Use and Correctness in sentences is clear, coherent and varied.  Writing adheres to the conventions of edited English in mechanics, grammar, and spelling.

          1                  2                 3                 4

 

Overall Score:  _______________                       Essay Grading Criteria:

A = 4

B = 3.5

C = 3

D = 2.5

F = 2 and below

Comments on Back!


 

OGLALA LAKOTA COLLEGE COURSE SYLLABUS

Humanities and Social Science Department

SpCm 433 Advanced Human Communication Skills

 

Rounded Rectangle: Instructor: Gary Jones
College Phone: 455-6000
Home Phone:   685-6985
E-Mail: GJones@olc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FILL IN

 

FILL IN

 
 


College Center: ________________                 Day and Sec. No.________________

SpCm 233 Human Communication Skills:  

This course offers an opportunity to learn and apply, in daily life, practical principles of human communication skills. Emphasis is placed on the skills of tactfulness in negotiation, diplomacy in dealing with others, poise, courtesy and politeness, sensitivity and perception, as well as psychological, social, cultural, and linguistic factors, which affect person-to-person interaction. This course is designed to help students improve their communication in personal and professional contexts both from the Lakota and the non-native perspective.

Office Hours:

My office hours are one hour before or one hour after a scheduled course.  On Fridays I can meet with students in the Humanities Department at Piya Wiconi (due to meetings and other commitments; however, these times will have to be scheduled ahead of time).

Prerequisites:    SpCm 103

Required Texts and Materials:

a.      Practicing Communication Ethics by Paula S. Tomkins

b.      Presentation Board

Types and Amount of Writing Expected:

 Students will read various chapters in the text.  Quizzes and tests will follow each chapter as they are read.  Essays will be assigned throughout the semester.  A final paper will be assigned to students to accompany their presentation board assignment.

Conferences:

Conferences will be scheduled throughout the semester.  This will give the instructor the opportunity to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each student, to assist in difficult assignments, and to develop a workable rapport.

Learning Objectives:

     1.  To learn how to be diplomatic without sacrificing the message.

     2.  To utilize diplomacy and tact when dealing with other people.

     3.  To acquire problem solving and conflict resolution techniques.

     4.  To improve manners such as being polite and courteous.

     5.  To improve social interaction skills in uncomfortable situations.

     6.  To include aspects of the Lakota culture into every activity.

 

Intended Outcomes:

1.       Students will know the skills needed to deal with people during a conflict.

2.      Students will demonstrate how to use diplomacy when dealing with people.

3.      Students will demonstrate how to negotiate in a positive manner.

4.      Students will demonstrate how to recognize non-verbal behavior and how to respond correctly.

5.      Students will be able to incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible.

6.      Students will receive a passing grade of a C or better.

Humanities Department Requirement:

Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including Multicultural Communication. Each student will retain personal copies of all of their assignment materials (rough drafts, revisions, et cetera) for their assignment and course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity, assignment and class discussion as this course progresses.

Each student must hand in a portfolio at the end of the semester and will complete the SIRII   (a teacher evaluation) at the end of the semester before receiving a final grade. Turn cell phones off while in class.  No IPods or Bluetooth Headsets or any other kinds of headsets or musical devices anything that squawks, beeps, or vibrates).

Suggestion to the Students:

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the current OLC catalog and Student Handbook as well as other college materials. Get in the habit of using your computer dictionary and thesaurus.  Any misspelled word will be notated and you will have to make the corrections.  Your thesaurus will help you to utilize words that will make your assignment more exciting and colorful. Stay away from words that are redundant and mundane.

Secondly, since I require all papers to be composed on the computer, I want you to save your material periodically as you are preparing each assignment.  Upon completion of your assignment, it may be prudent to save your paper to your hard drive as well as to your memory stick.

Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC and this course, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments, which will be provided during each class meeting. This will require your attendance and active participation throughout the semester.

 

GRADING

 

A: Evaluations and Markings

In Class Activities ..............................................  20%

Essays (4) …………...............................................  20%

Final Essay and Presentation.....……………………   35%

Attendance ..........................................................    5%

Chapter Quizzes …………………………………….…..    20%

                                                                                    100%          

 

B: Grading Schedule for Written Work and Grade Point Average

                           100-90       A                                            A = 4 grade pts

                                89-80        B                                            B = 3 grade pts.

                                79-70         C                                            C = 2 grade pts.

                                69-60        D                                            D = 1 grade pt.

                                59-0           F                                            F  = 0 grade pts.

 

It is the student’s responsibility to make photocopies of all records of grades and papers in case of a grade disagreement.

C: Late Grades

Assignments are to be handed in on time.  Many assignments follow the previous assignment, so you will need to know your mistakes (from your previous assignment) before working on your next task. Therefore, all late papers will receive a reduced grade because of lateness.

D: Incompletes

An incomplete grade is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.  Not turning work in on time is no excuse.

 

 

Attendance:

Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises.  You need to be here, in class, for the lecture and activities.  Make every effort to attend! If you know that you are going to have a miss, phone me at the center or at my home.  I can also be reached every Friday at my Piya Wiconi office. If you do not have a phone, get someone to stop by and inform me of your miss.

If a student is absent then it is impossible for him or her to participate in the class. However, each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation. Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:

1)      Three absences in a row constitute an automatic drop.

2)     Five scattered excused or unexcused absences (or a total of 15 hours missed) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).

3)     Tardiness and leaving early will be documented and will affect your final grade.

Withdrawals:

A prospective employer will not be pleased observing a number of W’s on your transcript. They may look at the W’s and believe that you missed a number of classes or that you dropped a class because it was a little too difficult.  You should also be aware that withdrawals (drops) will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.

 

Topical Content:

Week    1:    Discuss syllabus. Course orientation. Explain assignment due next week.

Week    2:    Discuss Chapter 2 and diplomacy handout.  Do workplace activity. Read chapter 4 for next week.

Week    3:    Discuss Chapter 4 and problem solving handout. Do chair activity. Quiz net week over chapters 2 and 4

Week    4:    Quiz over Chapters 2 and 4. Role model activity.

Week    5:    Discussion over conflict resolution. Role model activity. Guest speaker.

Week    6:    Discussion over Chapter 5 and also etiquette and tact. Role play.

Week    7:    Discussion over Ethics and community.  Break into groups.  Assign group activities.  Mid-term next week.

Week    8:    Mid-term test over Chapters 2, 4, 5, and also comments on our role play results.

Week    9:    Discussion over Chapter 9 (Ethics and Intercultural Comm.). Break into groups and assign different projects to each group.

Week   10:    Each group will present their findings and share the info with the rest of the class.

Week   11:     Discuss handout on self-confidence and Esteem.  Work on individual projects to present to the class on weeks 14 and 15.

Week   12:    Ethics in the work place. Discussion. Guest speaker.

Week   13:    Ethics in the classroom. Discussion. Work on projects.

Week   14:    Presentation board projects shared with the class. Discussion.

Week   15:    Presentation board projects (conclusion). Review and Pot Luck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Document Preparation:

Word processing is required for all papers.  Papers are to be typed and double-spaced. Do not justify the margins. Leave the right margin “ragged.” Use 12 pt Times Roman and double space. Papers may be submitted via e-mail.  Assistance will be provided in class. Remember to keep copies of all of your graded assignments as you will need them to create your final portfolio.

Methods for Delivering Assignments:

a)     Bring them to class

b)     Email them to me if you will be absent

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current college catalog states: 

Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. 

Plagiarism means copying from a book or article and/or copying from someone else’s ideas or opinions without citing the source.  Taking someone else’s paper and putting your name on it is also plagiarism.  Plagiarism will not be tolerated in this class.  Plagiarism will result in an F grade for the course.   The Humanities and Social Sciences department fully supports this policy. Plagiarism is theft!  If you have questions, contact me immediately.

Mid-Term and Final Exam:

The mid-term will test the students’ knowledge regarding the information gathered up to that point. The Final Exam will cover the information discussed in class throughout the semester.

GUN-FREE/WEAPON-FREE CAMPUS

Oglala Lakota College will adhere to a Gun-Free/Weapon-Free campus policy. All dangerous weapons, (dangerous weapons are defined as any firearm, knife, or device, instruments, materials, or substances, whether animate or inanimate which is calculated to inflict death or serious bodily harm) are banned from the Oglala Lakota College campus and properties. Weapons brought onto or carried on Oglala Lakota College property must have prior approval and conform to the safety regulations identified in the procedures below. Weapons carried by authorized law enforcement agents or used in military activities are exempt.

 

 

Instructional Methodology:

Instruction of this class is accomplished through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and physical involvement by the student.  Students will read chapters and handouts that pertain to the objectives pertinent to the assignment and then be asked to explain or demonstrate the outcome. Visual aids such as DVD’s, video tapes, and display board presentations will be utilized. Guest Speakers will be invited to talk to the class when appropriate.

 

Academic Freedom in Learning:

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.

 

Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

 

ADA Statement:

The Humanities and Social Sciences Department is reading-intensive, and you need to be able to read as much as 40 pages a week for this class.  You also need to be able to express yourself, both in writing and during class time.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please talk to the Instructor.  You may also contact Lenora Hudson at 605-455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs.

 

If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

 

Student Conduct:

OLC students will abide by the standards of conduct stated in the latest student handbook. 

Every student has the right to a safe learning environment.  OLC applies the following as acts of misconduct subject to disciplinary action: Any actual or threatened physical violence; Gross disorderly conduct; Verbal abuse or harassment; Vandalism; Attending classes under the influence of alcohol or drugs; and any other student conduct that causes a disruption in the classroom.  Any infringement of these rules could lead to dismissal.

AOD Policy: 

It is the policy of Oglala Lakota College to be an Alcohol and Other Drugs free environment; which applies to all faculty, staff, and students.  As a community dedicated to improving the skills and abilities of all Lakota and related peoples, we believe that an individual’s impairment from use of alcohol, or other drugs, defeats their ability to learn and also may threaten the achievement and safety of others; thus has no place on the campus, and will not be tolerated.  However, if you have an alcohol or drug problem, help is available to you free of charge through OLC’s Student Assistance Program (SAP).  For confidential help contact the SAP Coordinator, at the Piya Wiconi Administration building, or call 605-455-6000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer:

Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

 

 

 

Disability:

If you have a disability that interferes with your ability to learn and in need of assistance please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.  See OLC Policy 85-600 for further details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                       

CIRCULAR ROUTING SHEET

For

CHANGES IN POLICY/CURRICULUM RECOMMENDATIONS

 

Attached is the recommendation from the ___________________________________Committee.

 

Title: ____Government Administration______________________________________________

 

Affects:                ___Policy #________________      ___Curriculum / Dept. Chair________________

 

___New Policy                                     _X__New Curriculum

___Modifies Existing Policy                   ___Modifies Existing Curriculum

___Deletes Existing Policy                    ___Deletes Existing Curriculum

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

_________________________________________

Person Originating the Action                        Date

                                                                                    Action Taken

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Committee Chairperson                         Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

PWO Chairperson                                 Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Vice President for Instruction                 Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

President                                              Date

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

BOT Committee Action                         Date

 

______________________________________             ____________________________________

BOT Action                                          Date

 

 

Final Approval/Disapproval rerouted to submitters on: __________________________________

 

Explanations concerning disapproval or implementation:  ________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

*Please make a copy of this and route it back to the committee it originated from.

Note: Dates are official meetings when action was taken.


Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

___X__New _____Revised

 

Course Title: Government Administration

 

Statement of Need and Purposes

 

Government is the largest employer on the Pine Ridge Reservation, as well as in many other places.  This course, which gives an overview of government administration, is concerned with the management of public programs.  It provides a framework for the study of how government functions on-the-ground and focuses on the practice of governmental administration in all branches and types of governments.  Students gain real-world experience solving government administration problems and working with government employees.  This course is also helpful for students who are entering the non-profit sector.

 

While current OLC courses prepare students for the business world, this course prepares them to thrive in other types of employment.  Business administration is fundamentally different from government administration, and the addition of this course would allow our students to become prepared for careers in all three sectors – government, business, and nonprofit.

 

A Government Administration course will help our students more successfully navigate a bureaucratic system, regardless of their subject matter focus.  This offers broad-based preparation for careers in all types of governments and government-funded programs.

 

College Requirements Affected

 

Prerequisite will be English 113 with a “C” or better

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues

 

To be taught every fourth or fifth semester

 

Catalogue Description

 

This course uses contemporary public administration literature, public management cases, and simulations to introduce students to the theory and practice of administration of government programs.  Students work in teams to resolve issues and problems common to the public service environment.

 

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalog description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)


 

Pols 343 – GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATION

Section

 

Lilias Jarding, Ph.D.                  Phone: 605-877-5856                 E-mail: ljarding@olc.edu

Meetings with students before class, after class, and by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course uses contemporary public administration literature, public management cases, and simulations to introduce students to the theory and practice of administration of government programs.  Students work in teams to resolve issues and problems common to the public service environment.

 

COURSE FORMAT

The format involves careful reading, class discussion and exercises, lecture, a research paper and presentation, a midterm examination, and a final examination.  It is anticipated that this class will require at least four hours of work per week outside of class time, with additional time required for completion of the paper and before examinations.  Please plan to make the necessary time commitment.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. To gain an understanding of the theory, actors, institutions, processes, and practical problems involved in the operation of government agencies.
  2. To develop a better ability to critically analyze public policy and agencies at the tribal, federal, and state levels
  3. To be able to design solutions and to work to resolve government administration problems.
  4. To improve research, writing, and speaking skills.
  5. To be able to apply the information gained in this course to future activities related to government administration.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS           

Political Science is a reading-intensive field, and you need to be able to read 50 pages a week for this class.  You must also be able to express your thoughts clearly in written and oral form and take careful notes in class.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please see me or contact the Lenora Hudson at (605) 455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs.

 

If you’re not sure if your writing, speaking, test-taking, note-taking, or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

 

Grading: Assignments will be graded as follows:

In-Class Participation  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .100 points

Weekly Reading Reports  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 120 points

Midterm Examination  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  50 points

Research Paper  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  125 points

Presentation of Research Results  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   30 points

Final Examination .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   75 points

Total .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 500 points

 

Grading Scale: A: 450-500 points; B: 400-449 points; C: 350-399 points; D: 300-349 points; F: less than 300 points.  Your grade is based on your mastery of the material.  I do not curve grades.

 

Weekly Reading Reports: Each reading report will be worth a possible 10 points, and you will complete ten (120 points total).  Your paper must include all the readings assigned for that week.  Reading papers are due at class time on the day the reading is assigned.  Late papers will not be accepted, unless the student has an excused absence for the class.

 

The format for a reading report is:

·       Your name and the date on the top of the sheet

·       Citation (author, title, and chapter) on top of the sheet

·       Description: a brief summary of the reading (a paragraph)

·       Analysis: How does this week’s readings relate to past weeks’ readings?  Be specific and mention specific past readings.

·       Topic: State a minimum of one discussion topic that arises from the reading

 

A sample reading report is included on Dr. Jarding’s webfolder: (www.olc.edu/~ljarding/webfolder).

 

In-Class Participation: Class participation is critical to this course.  Students will be graded both on how often they participate in in-class activities and on the quality of their participation.  Merely being present does not equal participation.  Guidelines on class participation are available in Dr. Jarding’s webfolder (www.olc.edu/~ljarding/webfolder).  You will receive four participation grades during the semester, with a written explanation.  Each participation grade is a possible 25 points (100 points total).

 

Midterm Examination: The midterm examination will be a take-home examination composed of essay questions.  You will have one week to complete the midterm.

 

Research Paper: You will complete a research paper of approximately 12 pages about a local public administration issue, and you’ll present your results to the class.  The full assignment will be handed out and is also available in the instructor’s webfolder.

 

Final Examination: The final examination will be composed of multiple choice and essay questions.  It will cover the entire course (75 points).

 

Late Assignments: Weekly reading reports will not be accepted, if they are late.  Late research papers will be accepted up until the last class period, but will lose 20% of the points earned for the assignment.   The instructor does not give Incompletes.

 

EXPECTATIONS

Much emphasis is put on Lakota values, particularly respect in the classroom.  Being respectful in this class includes:

 

Communication: Students will use OLC e-mail for this class and are expected to check their e-mail at least twice a week.  You are responsible for all information the Instructor sends to you via e-mail.  You will also need to download some course materials through the course webfolder.  If class is cancelled for any reason, the instructor will call the college center, and an e-mail will be sent to all students.

 

Tardiness: In formulating this policy it is understood that unique problems exist for both students and faculty due to the decentralized nature of OLC.  Since classes meet only once per week, it is important that they be held – even if they begin late.

 

 If an instructor is going to be late getting to a college center for a class, the center staff will be notified, if at all possible.  A student shall be considered tardy for class, if he/she arrives late, but during the first hour of the class.  A student arriving later than this -- or leaving more than an hour before the end of the formal class time -- may be marked absent.

 

If an instructor is late for a class, students must wait for one-half hour.  After this time, the class will be considered cancelled for that week and must be made up.  In the event that no students appear for class at the scheduled starting time, the instructor should wait at least one-half hour before deciding to cancel the class.

 

Attendance Policy: Students are required to attend classes regularly.  Instructors will submit attendance on-line weekly.  If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student's responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor.  At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment.  However, an excused absence is the same as an unexcused absence until the student has completed work equivalent to being in class. Once the make-up assignment is completed, the instructor will then change the “absent” to “present.” 

 

A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences and will be dropped by the Registrar after five total absences.   There are NO reinstatements and NO exceptions for students who are dropped for five absences.  Students are responsible for tracking the number of absences listed in Jenzabar and for preventing themselves from being dropped from the course.  The instructor does not have the ability to change an “absent” to “present” after the student has missed five classes.