Instructional Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes
Chair
: Dr. Jeffrey Olson,   Vice-Chair: Kim He Crow Recorder: Julie Johnson

May 6, 2011

Woksape Tipi, Academic & Public Library

 

In attendance at meeting: Ahmed Al-Asfour, Georgia Rooks,   Jim Dudek, Charles Jason Tinant,  Laura Dunn, Kirk Costion, Jeffrey Olson,  Joseph Kirk, Thedna Zimiga, Leslie Mesteth, Julie Johnson, Dawn Frank, Sharon Running Hawk, Susie White Thunder,  Judith Graham , Christine Stagnetto, Kiri Close, Cory Yellow Boy, Al Schwalm, Lynea Bouhenguel, Bill Okrepkie, Elaine Gibbons

 

1.      Meeting called to order at 10:10 a.m.

 

2.      Prayer offered by Jim Dudek

 

3.      Minutes from March 11, 2011 and April 8, 2011 put forth for approval.

Motion to accept the meeting minutes from March 11, 2011 & April 8, 2011

 

a.       Motion to accept: Al Schwalm

b.      Seconded: Kirk Costion

Vote – Unanimously Passed

 

4.      Old Business – Second Readings

 

1.      Nursing Change – Nurs 326 changed to Nurs 328

a.        Motion to accept: Ahmed Al-Asfour

b.      Seconded: Judith Graham

Vote – Unanimously Passed

 

2.      Social Work Proposal – Change credits for degree from 99 to 120

a.       Motion to accept: Al Schwalm

b.      Seconded: Judith Graham

Vote –   16 For

                                    1 Abstained

 

3.      Humanities Changes – Art degree changes

 

1)      AA in Art: Current & Proposed Status Sheets

2)      Table of Art Courses (near complete) for NEW CAT 2011 – TBD

3)      REVISED Course Title:  change from Art 213: Anatomy to Art 213: Figure Drawing;

4)      DELETED: Hum 433: Capstone

5)      Art 203: Drawing II (new course) – with sample working syllabi

6)      Art 223: Painting I (new course) – with sample working syllabi

7)      Art 243: Painting II (new course) – with sample working syllabi

8)      Art 253: Graphic Arts Digital (new course) – with sample working syllabi

9)      Art 263: Introduction to Digital Photography (new course) – with sample working syllabi

10)  Art 273: Introduction to Sculpture (new course) – with sample working syllabi

11)  Art 283: Introduction to Printmaking (new course) – with sample working syllabi

12)  Art 303: Art History I (revision of course description) – with sample working syllabi

13)  Art 313: Art History II (revision of course description) – with sample working syllabi

14)  Art 323: Graduate Studio Project – with sample working syllabi

15)  REVISED  Course Description - Hum 203: Introduction to Philosophy & Critical Thinking – with sample working syllabi

16)              SPCM 313: Theatre and Drama (new course) – with sample working syllabi

17)               REINSERTED from pre-2008/2010 OLC Catalog (was never deleted):

            Art 173: Introduction to Ceramics

 

a.       Motion to accept:  Bill Okrepkie

b.      Seconded: Lynea Bouhenguel

Vote – Unanimously Passed

 

5.      Natural Science Degree Changes – A proposal for changes in the natural science

            Department with the amendment that Leslie will work with Jason to amend the proposal to             remove the typos.

a.       Motion to accept: Ahmed Al-Asfour

b.      Seconded: Leslie Mesteth

Vote – Unanimously Passed

 

6.      Instructional Technology-A proposal for changes in the instructional technology department.

 

a)      Motion to accept: Judith Graham

b)      Seconded: Bill Okrepkie

Vote –   18 For

                                                2-Opposed

                                                1-Abstained

7.    “certificate procedure 70-720-1” coming from the Financial Aid Office via Department of Education.  Any certificates that we award have to be approved by the department of education – Leslie Mesteth

          a)  Motion to accept:  Bill Okrepkie 

          b)  Seconded:  Judith Graham

                   Vote-  Unanimously Passed

 

8.  Gerry Giraud proposed changes to policy 72-6-/1 for special courses policy and procedure.

                   a)  Motion to accept:  Bill Okrepkie

                   b)  Seconded:  Judith Graham

                        Vote- Unanimously Passed

Motion to adjourn at 11:07 a.m. : Susie White Thunder

                                    Seconded:  Bill Okrepkie


CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR REVISED:

 

            Course_______________________                           Certificate_______________

            *AA Degree____X______________                         Minor___________________

            *BS/BA Degree___________________                    Other___________________

 

New______ or Revised_X______________

Title :Holistic Adulta Health Nursing II_____

 

course Numbers:   Change Nurs. 326 to Nurs. 328

Credits:____6 to 8 credits______________    Prerequisites:_same_______________________________

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

 

 

College Requirements Affected: None

 

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues: No change

 

 

Catalogue Description:   Same except Change Nurs 326 to Nurs. 328 , and change last sentence to read

 Spring Placement: 6 to 8 credits (4 to 6 theory credit hours,  same wording for rest)

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

__Joan G. Nelson 4-8-2011___________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date

Comments (Use back if necessary):


                                                                       

CIRCULAR ROUTING SHEET

For

CHANGES IN POLICY/CURRICULUM RECOMMENDATIONS

 

Attached is the recommendation from the Instructional Affairs Committee.

 

Title:

 

Affects:                Policy #_________________X__Curriculum / Dept. Chair Joan Nelson_____________

 

___New Policy                                                ___New Curriculum

___Modifies Existing Policy                __X_Modifies Existing Curriculum

___Deletes Existing Policy                  ___Deletes Existing Curriculum

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

______Joan G. Nelson, Chair Nursing Department__________4-8-2011_________________________

Person Originating the Action                        Date

                                                                                    Action Taken

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Committee Chairperson                                   Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

PWO Chairperson                                Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Vice President for Instruction              Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

President                                              Date

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

BOT Committee Action                                   Date

 

______________________________________             ____________________________________

BOT Action                                         Date

 

 

Final Approval/Disapproval rerouted to submitters on: __________________________________

 

Explanations concerning disapproval or implementation


                                                                       

CIRCULAR ROUTING SHEET

For

CHANGES IN POLICY/CURRICULUM RECOMMENDATIONS

 

Attached is the recommendation from the Instructional Affairs Committee.

 

Title: Revised Number of Credits for the BSW from 99 to 120

 

Affects:               X__Curriculum / Dept. Chair_Jeffrey Olson

 

___New Policy                                                ___New Curriculum

___Modifies Existing Policy                _X Modifies Existing Curriculum

___Deletes Existing Policy                  ___Deletes Existing Curriculum

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

_________________________________________

Person Originating the Action                        Date

                                                                                    Action Taken

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Committee Chairperson                                   Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

PWO Chairperson                                Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

Vice President for Instruction              Date          

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

President                                              Date

 

______________________________________              ____________________________________

BOT Committee Action                                   Date

 

______________________________________             ____________________________________

BOT Action                                         Date

 

 

Final Approval/Disapproval rerouted to submitters on: __________________________________

 

Explanations concerning disapproval or implementation:  ________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

*Please make a copy of this and route it back to the committee it originated from.

Note: Dates are official meetings when action was taken.


CURRICULUM CHANGES

 

PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR REVISED:

 

Revised BSW Degree

           

Title: Revision of Number of credits required to graduate with a BSW from 99 to 120

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

 

The North-Central Higher Learning Commission is going to require all bachelors level programs have a minimum number of credits.  This will likely go into effect for the fall semester of 2012.  Because OLC is putting out either a two or three year catalog, Social Work faculty thought it best to make the change before printing of the catalog rather than during its tenure. 

 

To this end seven courses are proposed to be added to the BSW status sheet bringing total credits required for graduation to 120. 

 

These seven courses include

 

1.      Lhist 203 – Lakota History

2.      CD 103 – Introduction to Alcoholism

3.      Three non-Lakota studies free electives

4.      Two upper division, non-Lakota Studies free electives

 

College Requirements Affected:

 

Requirements for earning a BSW

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs and Revenues:

 

None

 

Catalogue Description:

 

N/A

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    

Course titles and catalogue descriptions attached.

In addition to PWO form 1 attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

 

____________________________________       ________________________________

Department Chair                            Date               Instructional Vice President            Date


 

(OLD) DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

99 Credits required for graduation

 

A.            Core  (27 Credits)                                                                                Where taken  Date  Grade

 

            SpCm 103       Speech Communications                                 3______________________

            Engl 103          Freshman English I                             3______________________

            Engl 113          Freshman English II                            3______________________

            Humanities      Any Art, Music, Philosophy               3______________________

            Literature        Any Literature course                         3______________________

            Math 103         Elementary Algebra (or higher)                      3______________________

            Computing      IT 103 or MIS 113                              3______________________

            Biol 103                      Human Biology                                               3______________________

            Sosc 103          Introduction to Social Science                        3______________________

 

B.                   Lakota Studies Core (15 Credits)

 

Lak 103                       Lakota Language I                              3______________________

Lak 233                       Lakota Language II                            3______________________

Lsoc 103         Lakota Culture (or Lhist 203)             3______________________

Elective                       (Suggest Lpol 223)                             3______________________

Elective                       (Suggest Native Am Psych)                3______________________

 

C.                   Social Work General Studies Requirements (16 Credits)

 

Sowk 203        Foundations of Social Work               3______________________

Psyc 103          General Psychology                            3______________________

Quantitative    Statistics (Sosc 313 or Math 123)

                        or Math 134                                        4______________________

 

Free Elective   300 or 400 Free Elective

(Non-Lakota Studies)                         3______________________

 

Free Elective   300 or 400 Free Elective                                 3______________________

                        (Non-Lakota Studies)

 

 

D.                  Social Work Advanced Major Requirements (42 Credits)

 

Sowk 303            Social Welfare and Social Work History  3______________________

Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203

 

            Sowk 333        Human Behavior in the Soc Environ I            3______________________

                                    Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203,

 

            Sowk 343        Human Behavior in the Soc Environ II          3______________________

                                    Prereqs: Sowk 333

 

            Sowk 313        Social Work Methods I                                   3______________________

                                    Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203

 

            Sowk 323        Social Work Methods II                                 3______________________

                                    Prereqs: Sowk 313

 

            Sowk 403        Introduction to Research                                3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 323

 

            Sowk 413        Social Work Methods III                                3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 323

 

            Sowk 423        Social Work Methods IV                                3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 413

 

            Sowk 433        Social Work Elective                          3______________________

                                    Prereq: None

 

            Sowk 406        Social Work Practicum I                                 6______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 323, 343, and concurrent

                                    With Sowk 413

 

            Sowk 416        Social Work Practicum II                               6______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 406, and concurrent with

                                    Sowk 423

           

            Sowk 443        Research Project                                             3_______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 403

 


(NEW) DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

120 Credits required for graduation

 

A.            Core  (27 Credits) (Passed with C or better)                 Where taken  Date  Grade

 

            SpCm 103       Speech Communications                                 3______________________

            Engl 103          Freshman English I                                         3______________________

            Engl 113          Freshman English II                                        3______________________

            Humanities      Any Art, Music, Philosophy                           3______________________

            Literature        Any Literature course                                     3______________________

            Math 103         Elementary Algebra (or higher)                      3______________________

            Computing      IT 103 or MIS 113                                          3______________________

            Biol 103                      Human Biology                                   3______________________

            Sosc 103          Introduction to Social Science                        3______________________

 

E.                   Lakota Studies Core (15 Credits) (Passed with C or Better)

 

Lak 103                       Lakota Language I                              3______________________

Lak 233                       Lakota Language II                            3______________________

Lsoc 103         Lakota Culture                                                3______________________

Elective                       (Suggest Lpol 223)                             3______________________

Elective                       (Suggest Native Am Psych)                3______________________

 

F.                   Social Work General Studies Requirements (21 Credits) (Passed with C or better)

 

Free electives  9 credits (Non-Lakota Studies)                      3______________________

                                                                                                3______________________

                                                                                                3______________________

Upper Division            12 credits (Non-Lakota Studies)

Free Electives  300 or 400 Free Elective                                 3______________________

                                                                                                3______________________

                                                                                                3______________________

                                                                                                3______________________ 

                       

G.                Professional Study Requirements (15 credits) (Passed with C or better)

Sowk 203        Foundations of Social Work                           3______________________

Psyc 103          General Psychology                                        3______________________

Lhis 203                      Lakota History                                    3______________________

CD 103                       Introduction to Alcoholism                3______________________

Quantitative    Statistics (Sosc 313 or Math 123)

                        or Math 134                                                    3______________________

 

H.                  Social Work Advanced Major Requirements (42 Credits) (Passed with C or better)

 

Sowk 303        Social Welfare and Social Work History                    3______________________

Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203          

 

            Sowk 313        Social Work Methods I                                               3______________________

                                    Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203

 

            Sowk 323        Social Work Methods II                                             3______________________

                                    Prereqs: Sowk 313

 

Sowk 413        Social Work Methods III                                            3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 323

 

            Sowk 423        Social Work Methods IV                                            3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 413

 

Sowk 333        Human Behavior in the Soc Environ I                        3______________________

                                    Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203, Psy 103

 

Sowk 343        Human Behavior in the Soc Environ II                      3______________________

                                    Prereqs: Sowk 333

 

            Sowk 403        Introduction to Research                                            3______________________

                                    Sowk 323 & 343, Math 134 or

Sosc 313

 

            Sowk 443        Research Project                                                         3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 403

           

            Sowk 406        Social Work Practicum I                                             6______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 323, 343, and concurrent

                                    with or after Sowk 413

 

            Sowk 416        Social Work Practicum II                                           6______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 406, and concurrent with

                                    or after Sowk 423

 

Sowk 433        Social Work Elective                                      3______________________

                                    Prereq: Sowk 203 or Instructor Permission

 

 

 


NEW ART DEGREE, etc.:

Revisions, Deletions, New Course Offerings, etc.

(OLC HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT – AA in Art Degree REVAMP Task Force:

Tony Fresquez, Martin Red Bear, Gerald Cournoyer, Kiri Close)

 

Items listed for review:

1.      AA in Art: Current & Proposed Status Sheets                                                                                   page 2

2.      Table of Art Courses (near complete) for NEW CAT 2011 – TBD                                                   page 5

3.      REVISED Course Title:  change from Art 213: Anatomy to Art 213: Figure Drawing;                   page 7

DELETED: Hum 433: Capstone

 

1.      Art 203: Drawing II (new course) – with sample working syllabi –                                      page 9

2.      Art 223: Painting I (new course) – with sample working syllabi -                                                     page 18

3.      Art 243: Painting II (new course) – with sample working syllabi –                                                   page 30

 

 

1.      Art 253: Graphic Arts Digital (new course) – with sample working syllabi –                                    page 41

2.      Art 263: Introduction to Digital Photography (new course) – with sample working syllabi –          page 46

3.      Art 273: Introduction to Sculpture (new course) – with sample working syllabi –                            page 51

 

1.      Art 283: Introduction to Printmaking (new course) – with sample working syllabi                          page 56

2.      Art 303: Art History I (revision of course description) – with sample working syllabi –                  page 61

 

EMAIL #5

1.      Art 313: Art History II (revision of course description) – with sample working syllabi                    page 81

2.      Art 293: Graduate Studio Project – with sample working syllabi                                                      page 97

3.      REVISED  Course Description - Hum 203: Introduction to Philosophy & Critical Thinking

 – with sample working syllabi                                                                                                           page 99

 

**OTHER (file too large to distribute via OLC email):

SPCM 313: Theatre and Drama (new course) – with sample working syllabi

 

**REINSERTED from pre-2008/2010 OLC Catalog (was never deleted):

            Art 173: Introduction to Ceramics


 

 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

CURRENT AA in Art Status Sheet (as in OLC 2010-2011 Catalog)

 

I. Core Requirements (28 credits)                                                                           Where Taken          Date         Grade

Engl 103* Freshman English I                                                                                  3_________________________

Engl 113* Freshman English II                                                                                3_________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                                                      3_________________________

Math 134* Intermediate Algebra                                                                            4_________________________

Science (any 100 level course or higher)                                                                 3_________________________

Social Science Elective                                                                                               3_________________________

Art 303 Art History I                                                                                                   3_________________________

Art 313 Art History II                                                                                                 3_________________________

(Students seeking the A.A. degree in Art are required to take Art History I & II in place of Humanities I &II.)

 

II. Lakota Studies (15 credits)

Lak103 Lakota Language I                                                                                      3_________________________

Lak 233* Lakota Language II                                                                                 3_________________________

Lak203 Lakota History or LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                         3_________________________

LArt103 Traditional Lakota Arts I                                                                          3_________________________

LArt213 Plains Indian Design Composition                                                           3_________________________

 

III. Art Requirements (12 credits)

Art 103 Drawing I                                                                                                        3_________________________

Art 113 The Business of Art                                                                                      3_________________________

Art 123 Two-Dimensional Design                                                                            3_________________________

Art 233 Three-Dimensional Design                                                                          3_________________________

 

IV. Electives (6 credits)

________________________________________                                           3_________________________

________________________________________                                           3_________________________

________________________________________                                           3_________________________

 

Total: 61 Credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

Proposed New AA in Art Status Sheet (in revision from OLC 2010-2011 Catalog)

 

I. Core Requirements (AA in ART Majors required to complete 21 credit hours from this Core Section I)

                                                                                                                                        Where Taken          Date         Grade

Engl 103* Freshman English I                                                                                  3_________________________

Engl 113* Freshman English II                                                                                3_________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                                                      3_________________________

Math 103* Elementary Algebra                                                                               3_________________________

Humanities (any Hum 200 level course or higher)                                               3_________________________ 

SoSci 103*Introduction to Social Science                                                              3_________________________

Science Elective                                                                                                           3_________________________

(Students seeking the AA in ART Degree are required to complete all of the above in Section I)

 

 

II. Lakota Studies (AA in ART Majors required to complete 9 credit hours from this Section II)

Lak103 Lakota Language I                                                                                      3_________________________

LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                                                                          3_________________________

LArt103 Traditional Lakota Arts I OR

LArt213 Plains Indian Design Composition                                                           3_________________________

 

 

III. Art Requirements (AA in ART Majors required to complete 27 credit hours from this Section III)

Art 103 #Drawing I (Required for AA in ART Majors)                                     3_________________________

Art 203 *Drawing II (Required for AA in ART Majors)                                   3_________________________

Art 113 +#The Business of Art (Required for AA in ART Majors)                 3_________________________

Art 123 Two-Dimensional Design (Required for AA in ART Majors)            3_________________________

Art 213 *Figure Drawing                                                                                            3_________________________

Art 223 #Painting I (Required for AA in ART Majors)                                     3_________________________

Art 233 Three-Dimensional Design                                                                          3_________________________

Art 303 +#Art History I (Required for AA in ART Majors)                              3_________________________

Art 313 *+#Art History II (Required for AA in ART Majors)                          3_________________________

Art 323 *+Graduate Studio Project (Required for AA in ART Majors)         3_________________________

(Non-AA in ART Majors may take Art History II without taking Art History I as a prerequisite. Non-AA in ART Majors welcome to enroll in any Art class to fit their own status sheet toward their non-AA in ART Major)

 

 

IV. Art Electives as Emphasis (AA in ART Majors required to complete 9 credit hours based on their Emphasis area in this  Section IV)

Art 133 #Introduction to Watercolor                                                                                       3_______________________

Art 143 #Introduction to Oil Painting                                                                     3_______________________

Art 173 #Introduction to Ceramics                                                                          3_________________________

Art 153 #School Arts and Crafts                                                                              3_________________________

Art 243 *Painting II                                                                                                    3_________________________

Art 273 *#Introduction to Sculpture                                                                       3_________________________

Art 253 *+Graphic Arts Digital                                                                                 3_________________________

Art 263 *#Digital Photography                                                                                 3_________________________

Art 283 *#Introduction to Printmaking                                                                  3_________________________

(AA in ART Majors will choose Electives dependent upon their Status Sheet Emphasis: a)Teaching/Education, or b)Two-Dimensional, c)Three-Dimensional, or d) Graphic Arts Digital. Non-AA in ART Majors welcomed to take any Art class to fit their own status sheet toward their non-AA in ART Major and with the permission of course instructor).

 

SYMBOLS’ KEY:

*: Pre-requisite

+: Pictel friendly course

#: Open to Community for ‘Visiting’

 

Total: 66 Credits

TABLE of ART COURSE ROSTER

(of Near Complete Course Listings for New Cat)

 

ART COURSES

(existing, revised, new)

SUGGESTIONS

Art 103 Drawing I

 

NEW: ART 203 *Drawing II

 

NEW: ART 223 Painting I

 

NEW: ART 243 *Painting II

 

NEW: ART 253 *Graphic Arts Digital

 

NEW: ART 273 *Introduction to Sculpture

 

NEW: ART 263 *Digital Photography

 

NEW: ART 283 *Introduction to Printmaking

 

NEW: Art 323 *Graduate Studio Project (Required)

 

REINSERTED (see OLC Catalog 2007-2008):

ART 173 Introduction to Ceramics

 

Art 123 Two-Dimensional Design

 

Art 233 Three-Dimensional Design

 

REVISED TITLE & COURSE DESCR:

Art 303 Art History I: Global Prehistory to European Pre-Renaissance

OLD:

ART 303: Art History I

REVISED TITLE & COURSE DESCR:

ART 313 Art History II: European Renaissance to Contemporary Internationalism

OLD:

ART 313: Art History II

REVISED TITLE:

Art 213 Figure Drawing  

OLD:

ART 213: Anatomy

Art 113 The Business of Art

 

Art 133 Introduction to Watercolor

 

Art 143 Introduction to Oil Painting

 

Art 153 School Arts and Crafts

 

Art 290/490 Special Topics in Art

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

OTHER:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Curriculum Change Form

Proposal for Course change

    X     Revised (Course Title)

OLD Course Title:

ART 213: Anatomy

NEW Course Title:

ART 213: Figure Drawing

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Course Title has been revised to more clearly differentiate from other ‘anatomy’ courses in other Oglala Lakota College departments.

College Requirements Affected:

None

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

Course Prerequisites:  TBD

 

(If new course , attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

In addition to PWO form 1,  attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Change Form

Proposal for Course change

   _    _New          

    _    Revised (Course Title)

_X__Deletion

Course Title:

HUM 433: Capstone

Statement of Need and Purposes:

HUM 433 will be replaced by ART 323 *Graduate Studio Project as the AART Degree capstone project more specifically designed for majors.

College Requirements Affected:

None

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the ART 323 *Graduate Studio Project course and can teach it.

Course Prerequisites:  TBD

 

(If new course , attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1,  attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Change Form

Proposal for Course change

   X    New          

        Revised

NEW Course Title:

Art 203 *Drawing II

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 203 *Drawing II

This course is designed for the art student who will advance in drawing with an emphasis on studio production relevant to both basic elements and mastery of drawing principles.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree. Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty  have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 103 Drawing I

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oglala Lakota College – Humanities Department: Art Program

DRAWING II

 

 

ART 203*Drawing II Course Description:

This course is designed for the art student who will advance in drawing with an emphasis on studio production relevant to both basic elements and mastery of drawing principles.

 

 

 
College Center:   _____________                Day and  Sec. No.________________

Prerequisite: ART 103.  - 3 credits

Office Hours:  Due to differing/conflicting student and instructor schedules, students are encouraged to approach the instructor as to when they would like to meet. All student-instructor meetings are confidential & held privately.

Prerequisites: ART 103: DRAWING I (having completed the prerequisite with a grade of ‘C’ or better).

Required Texts and Materials:  TBD

Reading Load: As accorded by the syllabus timeline found further on this syllabus, all students are required to complete readings as listed by instructor.

Types and Amount of Writing Expected:  Quizzes held at the beginning of each class to ensure assignments have been worked on.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To research and recognize appropriate material for each assigned in-class & out-of-class drawing assignment.
  2. To further  enhance the artistic expression of each student in drawing and self confidence through this course.
  3. To analyze and assess the effectiveness of each student drawing level in an appropriate manner.
  4. To enhance by practice all the drawing techniques offered in this course to the student by the student showing his/her understanding of light, dark, line, shape, size, volume, shadow, etc.
  5. To articulate the drawing assignments in a clear
  6. To develop a space in the studio classroom that allows students to artistically release particular anxieties that may not be freely expressed in other outlets.
  7. To incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible within a performance.

 

Intended Outcomes:

1.       Students will learn how to research appropriate material for each drawing assignment.

2.       Students will utilize course topic outlines suitable to each assigned piece.

3.       Students will comprehend how to analyze and assess the effectiveness of expressive emotion in DRAWING II in an appropriate manner (as to what each assignment calls for) utilizing newly taught then practiced drawing criteria learned in Prerequisite ART 103: DRAWING I.

4.       Students will be able to articulate each speech in a clear and understanding manner using mind and inspiration guided  movement during a drawing session.

5.       Students will be able to incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible.

6.       Students will take this class as seriously as all other courses.

7.       Students will share in the vision that this class allows freedom of artistic expression through advanced DRAWING II level as a means of ‘safely’ dealing with life anxieties.

8.       Students will receive a passing grade of a C or better.

 

          

Evaluation and Markings (percentages):

In Class Theatrical/Dramatic Activities...............................................30%

Quizzes & Homework Assignments...................................................20%

Final Test  (public performance)……………………………………….20%

Attendance (absences & tardies delete points)………………………30%

                        TOTAL…………………………100%

 

Grading Schedule for All Work and Grade Point Average

100-90       A                                            A= 4 grade pts

89-80         B                                            B= 3 grade pts.

79-70         C                                            C= 2 grade pts.

69-60         D                                            D= 1 grade pt.

59-0           F                                            F=  0 grade pts.

 

It is the student’s responsibility to make photocopies of all records of grades and papers in case of a grade disagreement.

 

Humanities Department Requirement: Each student must hand in a portfolio at the end of the semester.  Students will also take the SIRII  to evaluate the instructor.  Turn cell phones off in the class.   No IPods or Bluetooth Headsets or any other kinds of headsets or musical devices are allowed (anything that beeps, squawks, or vibrates).

LAKOTA PERSPECTIVE PROVIDED THROUGH, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Students are aware of their cultural identity.
  • Students will have a sense of Lakota and other indigenous people, and non-native history.
  • Students will have careers relevant to Liberal Arts which enhance and benefit life on and off the reservation.
  • Students will be prepared for graduate level work.
  • Students exhibit civic responsibility.

The Lakota perspective, especially the practice of Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi, is provided via the interaction between students and the instructor where the traditional Lakota values of patience, mutual respect, and honor are maintained. Students are expected to assist the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective within the scope of all of this course’s activities. It is heavily encouraged that student thought, expression, and discussions continually supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

CLASS & STUDENT CONDUCT (in relation to Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi):

  • Wolakolkiciyapi: Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage. If a student displays hostility, irrelevant & disruptive over-garrulousness, or other misconduct that is disturbing to his or her classmates and the instructor, the instructor will meet with that student privately to discuss the matter. Racial, and/or sexist slurs, jokes, teases, or other types of snide, hurtful, inappropriate , discriminatory,  bullying, or embarrassing remarks or actions performed in/out of class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff, & faculty are considered ‘student misconduct’. If misconduct persists, students may be approached by OLC administration. These comments can easily be considered threats which are grounds for expulsion from OLC and an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class. When students comment on the ‘uselessness’ of ART 163 DRAWING II, students should be prepared for me (instructor) to question them on the spot as to why they would thoughtlessly produce such shallow, unfounded comments.
  • CLASS DISRUPTIONS: Abrupt, random outbursts of loud garrulousness will not be tolerated (e.g., when speaking to me (the instructor), other students, staff, on the cell phone, passersby, etc.). Violent activities, loud music devices played at inappropriate times during class, noisy and late entrances into class once in session, hostile tones and comments/personalities, copying assigned work from another, incessant and disruptive movements, disruptive chatter amongst students who appear not to be attentive to lessons, etc., are not tolerated. NO TEXT MESSAGING ALLOWED during class. All cell phones and electronic devices used for communication not relevant to in-class lectures must be switched off or set to ‘silent’ or ‘vibrate’. Consistent in subordination of this rule will result in student’s deletion of points as penalty.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not tolerated within or without class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff & faculty either online, via email, by phone, vis-à-vis/in person, or by other modes of digital communication (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Bebo, Linked In, MySpace, iPod, iPod Touch, blogging, etc.). Since sexual harassment may be classified as a threat, a student can be immediately expelled from OLC. Additionally, a DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class will result. Sexual harassment is considered to be any of the following, but not limited to: unwanted touching of another’s body that causes the other’s discomfort; unwanted vocal, facial, or bodily expressions of an unwanted sexual nature from one student to another; any form of unwanted digital communication utilizing sexual denotational or connotational innuendo; sexual abuse of double entendres in any language; harmful teasing of one’s personal choice in sexual orientation (e.g., we will not use terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, ‘dyke’, ‘butch’, etc. in any harmful or uncomfortable way – therefore, the use of these terms is prohibited); inappropriate verbal or other use of body parts from one student to another; bullying of a student to date you or even ‘hang out’ with you;  ‘ogling’ of any form over another’s body and/or body parts inappropriately; sexual physical assault; date rape; use of pornographic images to approach another inappropriately; approaching another to pay for sexual favors; stalking; vocabulary that inappropriately privileges one gender or sex over the other; unwanted company; inappropriate approaching for a ‘date’; flirting to get your way; the meaning of ‘NO’; defamation; cyber bullying affiliated with sexual harassment; etc. Sexual harassment can be caused by, and happen to anyone regardless of race, gender, sex, status, age, etc.
  • THREATS, USE OF NEPOTISM, STUDENT INSUBORDINATION: While freedom of creative, thoughtful expression is absolutely encouraged in this course, I will not tolerate any form of insubordination, thoughtless insult, or any form of threat by students (e.g., threat to use a family relation or associate on the school, college center board, or political prestige as a way to bully or ‘corner’ the instructor or other students from progressing or exercising their rights enforced by OLC policy; physical or verbal threats imposed on others; gang related; family related; romantically linked, etc.). If a student feels that another in the class has displayed such hostility, the ‘accused’ will be privately approached by instructor for a resolution. If threats/insubordination persist, OLC administration will be prompted for possible and immediate expulsion from OLC as well as an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class (in concurrence with OLC policies for student grievance, disciplinary actions, etc.). A student’s personal expression of who they are NEVER LICENSES their right to impose upon another student, faculty, staff, administration, class guest, etc. According to OLC policy, all students are encouraged to practice their right to file a grievance against another student freely.
  • STUDENTS UNDER THE INFLUENCE: On suspicion, the instructor reserves the right to approach intoxicated students under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances. Most likely, these students will be immediately sent home and reported to that OLC college center’s administrative personnel. Students are expected to perform academic assignments while sober, and alert. The teacher will approach a student about their online assignment submissions on suspicion of alcohol influence, use of illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances.
  • TOBACCO ON CAMPUS: The use of commercial chewing and/or smoking tobacco is absolutely prohibited at all OLC college centers as well as inside the classrooms (whether class is in session or otherwise).
  • GUN-FREE/WEAPON-FREE CAMPUS: Oglala Lakota College will adhere to a Gun-Free/Weapon-Free campus policy. All dangerous weapons, (dangerous weapons are defined as any firearm, knife, or device, instruments, materials, or substances, whether animate or inanimate which is calculated to inflict death or serious bodily harm) are banned from the Oglala Lakota College campus and properties. Weapons brought onto or carried on Oglala Lakota College property must have prior approval and conform to the safety regulations identified in the procedures below. Weapons carried by authorized law enforcement agents or used in military activities are exempt.
  • DISABILITY: If you feel you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at (605)455-6040. I am happily always ready to offer any assistance as your teacher to ensure your well being :o)  
  • See OLC 2010-2011 Catalog, AND OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner.
  • CHILDREN: As OLC college center policy states, children of students are not permitted in class while it is in session. Please make arrangements for their care outside class. While children are a blessing, there is no facility available that allows children to be present in classes with their parent(s). I am absolutely strict with this rule. Students who must leave or be absent from class due to child issues will be marked absent for that day/evening. Situation approached on a case by case basis.

*As situations not listed above arise, other codes of conduct, conduct resolutions, etc. will be utilized. Teacher reserves the right to combine the above words and OLC 2010-2011 Catalog  &  OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner policies, OLC Policy and Procedure Manual links on the college website (http://www.olc.edu/about/governance/), as well as OLC Administrative personnel regarding class & student conduct along with other aspects listed in this syllabus as deemed necessary (e.g., Academic Integrity & Plagiarism, Policies on Plagiarism or Cheating, etc. ).

 

  • Additional Instructional Methodology:

Instruction of this class is accomplished through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and physical involvement by the student.  Students will read chapters and handouts that pertain to the objectives pertinent to the assignment and then be asked to explain or demonstrate the outcome. Visual aides such as DVD’s, video tapes, and display board presentations will be utilized. Guest speakers will be invited to talk to the class when appropriate.

·                Academic Freedom in Learning:

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled. Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

  • ADA Statement:

The Humanities and  Social Sciences Department is reading-intensive, and you need to be able to read as much as 40 pages a week for this class.  You also need to be able to express yourself, both in writing and during class time.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please talk to the Instructor.  You may also contact Lenora Hudson at 605-455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs. If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

Learning Objectives: The Humanities and Social Sciences department has adopted the following objectives WHEN NEEDED & WHEN APPROPRIATE:

  1. The ability to identify, define, solve, & reflect on situations found in literature. (Critical Thinking)
  2. The ability to locate and evaluate information utilizing some current technology. (Research and Writing)
  3. The ability to communicate with accuracy and clarity. (Speaking, Writing, Thinking of Literary Art)
  4. The ability to read, comprehend, retain, apply and utilize sources of information responsibly. (Reading and Writing)
  5. Develop an understanding of Lakota culture and philosophy within the broader context of a diverse global society.

Oglala Lakota College has adopted the improvement of student learning as an integral purpose related to students’ learning objectives. Additionally, the OLC Humanities and Social Sciences Department encourages this fundamental belief within its ART 163: DRAWING II course. As a result of the reflective process each student undergoes, students will have the opportunity to develop an enhanced understanding of the integral aspect of the “human & artful experience”.

Student Responsibilities and Special Course Requirements: Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including ART 163 DRAWING II. Each student will retain a personal copy of all of her/his activity and assignment materials for her/his course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity and assignment as this course progresses.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current OLC college catalog states:

“Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty”. (10)

POLICIES ON PLAGIARISM OR CHEATING IN RELATION TO RELEVANT WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation (a form of acknowledgement). REMEMBER: Art Work can be plagiarized.

Although a person may give her/his permission to you to utilize her/his words or ideas, it is plagiarism unless you credit her/him for the specific idea or words. You are responsible for understanding plagiarism. Contact me with any questions you may have. Most cases of plagiarism are the result of improper citation or utilization of punctuation (quotation marks) and can be easily avoided. We will utilize the current MLA style manual for this course (I have a copy of MLA style). If you are unfamiliar with it or have forgotten how to utilize the MLA formats, contact me immediately and I can provide you with several sources. However, ENG 103 is a prerequisite for this course already.

*On suspicion of cheating and/or plagiarism, the teacher reserves the right to search online for works  from the student’s assignment submission, and to also require the student to redraw the same assignment (or another work) while the teacher is physically present. The teacher also has the right to suspect then privately approach any student if cheating and/or plagiarism is sensed.

Course Geography: Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments. This will require your weekly participation throughout the semester. Class discussions should include substantive input from each student each week.

 

Course Assignments: There will be a variety of drawing activities/assignments as the course progresses. Quizzes and additional activities (discussions, presentations, new drawing methods at the advanced Drawing II level, etc.) should be anticipated. I may retain all written student work in portfolios as well as a record of your completed & comprehended assignments.  ALL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS.

 

PARTICIPATION STANDARD/COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS:

OLC’s institutional attendance policy is outlined on page 13 of the current catalog which states:

Students are required to attend class regularly. If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor. At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. An excused absence is counted in a student’s total number of absences. A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences at the discretion of the instructor and district director and will be dropped after five total absences. The instructor must submit a drop card by the 15th week or a letter grade.

Additionally, in this course, 2 tardies (consecutive or not) equate one absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class WEEKLY throughout the semester by demonstrating and exhibiting a tertiary level (at the very least) of weekly class involvement having read & screened all assigned materials.

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises. 
  • Normally, missed classes CANNOT BE MADE UP for this course. Prompt & consistent attendance is required.
  • Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.
  • Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:
    • Three (3) ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) in a row constitutes an automatic drop.
    • Five (5) scattered ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).
    • Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded (see below). Further, 2 tardies = 1 absence in my class.
    • All ABSENCES – EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED – will be used to drop each student who has exceeded absences by OLC Registrar. Once a student is dropped, they CANNOT be reinstated (OLC Registrar policy/Dept. of Education).
    • Students must not exceed ‘break time’ past the regulated 15 minutes class recess block.
    • Both Absences & Tardies result in student points deletion
    • The instructor will decide whether or not an ABSENCE is Excused or Unexcused.
    • Class begins promptly on the hour. Students who arrive 1 minute past the set time will be marked TARDY.
    • Students who arrive after the first hour of class are considered ABSENT for the day.
    • Students who leave class before the designated end time without my authorization are considered ABSENT for the day. Informing me (the instructor) of your absence does not equate an ‘excused’ absence.
    • Students will lost points when TARDY, ABSENT, or when not working during their presence in class.
    • Attendance is recorded by me (the instructor) at the beginning of class, and is the first task upon commencement of class time.
  • If you must miss a class in case of an emergency, you should call or email the instructor, and pick up assignments from my box at the college center, or utilize other methods of correspondence in regards to make-up work. Do not call to speak to me once class for the day/evening has begun (9am/1pm/5pm). If you are to be late, or absent for class, please leave a polite message with the college center staff, & leave the message(s) by at least 15 minutes before class begins. Please be considerate.
  • Early leave from class (unannounced and/or not authorized by the instructor) is considered an absence for the day. Also, if you announce or inform me that you will leave prior to the completion of class (12noon/4pm/8pm), it may also be considered an absence. Please inform me via email or by phone ahead of time (15 minutes before class begins) to discuss. Please be considerate.
  • You should also be aware that drops from my class will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.
  • At an announced point in time during the semester, the OLC Registrar’s office will drop you from courses if class absences are exceeded. Instructors no longer have the initial control on the OLC Jenzabar site in this regard – EXCUSED ABSENCES also result in OLC Registrar’s Office officially dropping you from class.

 

  • Incompletes:An incomplete grade is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.  Not turning work in on time is no excuse.

 

Feedback Schedule: I hope to provide you feedback the day(s)/week(s) following the submission of an assignment. I will be checking my OLC email (gcournoyer@olc.edu) frequently throughout the week. I will also utilize your OLC email address to communicate with you, & am open to use your other email addresses to correspond with you if needed.

 

Course Procedures and Policies on Late Assignments:

 Late Work will receive one of the two following grades:

1.               The grade the work actually deserves.

2.               The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Methods for Delivering Assignments: Each assignment should be submitted by the student (herself/himself). There may be circumstances which may require a student to submit an assignment in an alternative manner; however, the alternative delivery should be discussed with me before the assignment’s due date. You need to retain a copy of all of your activities and assignments. I should never have the only copy of anything (consider a USB flash drive and/or a CD that archives your work).

QUIZZES: Quizzes are held at the very beginning of class immediately following attendance/roll call. Quizzes cannot be made up once completed (as many of them are ORAL/VERBAL due to line memorization for parts from a particular speech, while written are to ensure that textbook reading has been completed & comprehended by the start of every class period). Points accumulated during quizzes will be used toward your final grade. Some of the main purposes of quizzing students is to more further: combat tardiness, enforce the reading assignments from the previous week, aid students in point accumulation, as well as help them hone in on their acting ‘chops’/expressive craft. Quizzes in this class are based on Drawing techniques and will show if a student has practiced their Drawing methods consistently while outside of class.

 

MIDTERM & FINAL EXAMS: TBD

 

RESEARCH: While there is no formal research/term paper assigned for this course, students have the option in discussing with me the possibilities of composing one.

 

NOTE ON PEER REVIEW: While it would behoove you to allow another person to review & critique your performative assignments, I am highly concerned about whom you allow to do so. Please choose a reviewer who is well informed, truly experienced, & positive of the Art 163 Drawing II level expectation. I strongly suggest you choose an experienced tutor to review your work. However, it is helpful to kindly ask and involve friends and family members to help with inspirational critique :o)

Course Evaluation: I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation distributed at the end of the course. Ideally, this activity will be completed during week thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: At the very least, this course will utilize the drawing standards used in the Art 103 Drawing I course as far as skill and criteria are concerned.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Only students that complete this course with a letter grade of ‘B’ will be allowed LORs, or letters of recommendation.

 

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus is, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered an inflexible ‘contract’ between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

 

 

 


TENTATIVE Syllabus

Prof.   --  Oglala Lakota College

Regular Class Time (weather sensitive):

1pm – 2:15pm / 5pm – 6:15pm - LECTURE, discussion

2:16pm – 2:31pm / 6:16pm – 6:31pm - Break

2:32pm – 3:45pm / 6:32pm – 7:45pm - Lecture, discussion

3:45pm – 4pm / 7:45pm – 8pm - Homework Preview, Discussion, Miscellaneous, dismissal, Extra, etc.

Week 1:  

Week 2:  

Week 3:  

Week 4:  

Week 5:  

Week 6:  

Week 7:  

Week 8:  

Week 9:  

Week 10:  

Week 11:  

Week 12: 

Week 13: 

Week 14:  

Week 15: 

 

 

 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

        Revised

 

 

NEW Course Title:

Art 223 Painting I

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 223 Painting I

This course is designed for students who wish to explore introductory element techniques of acrylic painting.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites:  TBD

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oglala Lakota College  -  Humanities Department: Art Program

Painting I

Gerald Cournoyer, MFA

Tuesday: 1:00-4:00pm / Pejuta Haka - Fall 2010

 

ART 223 Painting I: This course is designed for students who wish to explore introductory element techniques of acrylic painting. There are definitely other possibilities to other kinds of paintings in this course.

Office Hours:  Due to differing/conflicting student and instructor schedules, students are encouraged to approach the instructor as to when they would like to meet. All student-instructor meetings are confidential & held privately.

 

Prerequisites: TBD (having completed the prerequisite with a grade of ‘C’ or better).

Required Texts and Materials:  TBD

Reading Load: As accorded by the syllabus timeline found further on this syllabus, all students are required to complete readings as listed by instructor.

 

**Quizzes held at the beginning of each class to ensure assignments have been worked on.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To research and recognize appropriate material for each assigned in-class & out-of-class painting assignment.
  2. To further enhance the artistic expression of each student in painting and self confidence through this course.
  3. To analyze and assess the effectiveness of each student painting level in an appropriate manner.
  4. To enhance by practice all the drawing techniques offered in this course to the student by the student showing his/her understanding of several painting principles.
  5. To articulate the painting assignments with clarity of self creativity.
  6. To develop a space in the studio classroom that allows students to artistically release particular anxieties that may not be freely expressed in other outlets.
  7. To incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible within a performance.

 

Intended Outcomes:

9.       Students will learn how to research appropriate material for each painting assignment.

10.   Students will utilize course topic outlines suitable to each assigned piece.

11.   Students will comprehend how to analyze and assess the effectiveness of expressive emotion in PAINTING I in an appropriate manner (as to what each assignment calls for) utilizing newly taught then practiced drawing criteria learned.

12.   Students will be able to articulate each speech in a clear and understanding manner using mind and inspiration guided movement during a drawing session.

13.   Students will be able to incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible.

14.   Students will take this class as seriously as all other courses.

15.   Students will share in the vision that this class allows freedom of artistic expression through the PAINTING I level as a means of ‘safely’ dealing with life anxieties.

16.   Students will receive a passing grade of a C or better.

 

Evaluation and Markings (percentages):

In Class Activities...............................................30%

Quizzes & Homework Assignments...................................................20%

Final Test……………………………………….20%

Attendance (absences & tardies delete points)………………………30%

                        TOTAL…………………………100%

 

Grading Schedule for All Work and Grade Point Average

100-90       A                                            A= 4 grade pts

89-80         B                                            B= 3 grade pts.

79-70         C                                            C= 2 grade pts.

69-60         D                                            D= 1 grade pt.

59-0           F                                            F=  0 grade pts.

 

It is the student’s responsibility to make photocopies of all records of grades and papers in case of a grade disagreement.

 

Humanities Department Requirement: Each student must hand in a portfolio at the end of the semester.  Students will also take the SIRII  to evaluate the instructor.  Turn cell phones off in the class.   No IPods or Bluetooth Headsets or any other kinds of headsets or musical devices are allowed (anything that beeps, squawks, or vibrates).

 

LAKOTA PERSPECTIVE PROVIDED THROUGH, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Students are aware of their cultural identity.
  • Students will have a sense of Lakota and other indigenous people, and non-native history.
  • Students will have careers relevant to Liberal Arts which enhance and benefit life on and off the reservation.
  • Students will be prepared for graduate level work.
  • Students exhibit civic responsibility.

The Lakota perspective, especially the practice of Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi, is provided via the interaction between students and the instructor where the traditional Lakota values of patience, mutual respect, and honor are maintained. Students are expected to assist the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective within the scope of all of this course’s activities. It is heavily encouraged that student thought, expression, and discussions continually supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

 

CLASS & STUDENT CONDUCT (in relation to Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi):

  • Wolakolkiciyapi: Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage. If a student displays hostility, irrelevant & disruptive over-garrulousness, or other misconduct that is disturbing to his or her classmates and the instructor, the instructor will meet with that student privately to discuss the matter. Racial, and/or sexist slurs, jokes, teases, or other types of snide, hurtful, inappropriate , discriminatory,  bullying, or embarrassing remarks or actions performed in/out of class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff, & faculty are considered ‘student misconduct’. If misconduct persists, students may be approached by OLC administration. These comments can easily be considered threats which are grounds for expulsion from OLC and an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class. When students comment on the ‘uselessness’ of ART 223 PAINTING I, students should be prepared for me (instructor) to question them on the spot as to why they would thoughtlessly produce such shallow, unfounded comments.
  • CLASS DISRUPTIONS: Abrupt, random outbursts of loud garrulousness will not be tolerated (e.g., when speaking to me (the instructor), other students, staff, on the cell phone, passersby, etc.). Violent activities, loud music devices played at inappropriate times during class, noisy and late entrances into class once in session, hostile tones and comments/personalities, copying assigned work from another, incessant and disruptive movements, disruptive chatter amongst students who appear not to be attentive to lessons, etc., are not tolerated. NO TEXT MESSAGING ALLOWED during class. All cell phones and electronic devices used for communication not relevant to in-class lectures must be switched off or set to ‘silent’ or ‘vibrate’. Consistent in subordination of this rule will result in student’s deletion of points as penalty.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not tolerated within or without class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff & faculty either online, via email, by phone, vis-à-vis/in person, or by other modes of digital communication (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Bebo, Linked In, MySpace, iPod, iPod Touch, blogging, etc.). Since sexual harassment may be classified as a threat, a student can be immediately expelled from OLC. Additionally, a DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class will result. Sexual harassment is considered to be any of the following, but not limited to: unwanted touching of another’s body that causes the other’s discomfort; unwanted vocal, facial, or bodily expressions of an unwanted sexual nature from one student to another; any form of unwanted digital communication utilizing sexual denotational or connotational innuendo; sexual abuse of double entendres in any language; harmful teasing of one’s personal choice in sexual orientation (e.g., we will not use terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, ‘dyke’, ‘butch’, etc. in any harmful or uncomfortable way – therefore, the use of these terms is prohibited); inappropriate verbal or other use of body parts from one student to another; bullying of a student to date you or even ‘hang out’ with you;  ‘ogling’ of any form over another’s body and/or body parts inappropriately; sexual physical assault; date rape; use of pornographic images to approach another inappropriately; approaching another to pay for sexual favors; stalking; vocabulary that inappropriately privileges one gender or sex over the other; unwanted company; inappropriate approaching for a ‘date’; flirting to get your way; the meaning of ‘NO’; defamation; cyber bullying affiliated with sexual harassment; etc. Sexual harassment can be caused by, and happen to anyone regardless of race, gender, sex, status, age, etc.
  • THREATS, USE OF NEPOTISM, STUDENT INSUBORDINATION: While freedom of creative, thoughtful expression is absolutely encouraged in this course, I will not tolerate any form of insubordination, thoughtless insult, or any form of threat by students (e.g., threat to use a family relation or associate on the school, college center board, or political prestige as a way to bully or ‘corner’ the instructor or other students from progressing or exercising their rights enforced by OLC policy; physical or verbal threats imposed on others; gang related; family related; romantically linked, etc.). If a student feels that another in the class has displayed such hostility, the ‘accused’ will be privately approached by instructor for a resolution. If threats/insubordination persist, OLC administration will be prompted for possible and immediate expulsion from OLC as well as an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class (in concurrence with OLC policies for student grievance, disciplinary actions, etc.). A student’s personal expression of who they are NEVER LICENSES their right to impose upon another student, faculty, staff, administration, class guest, etc. According to OLC policy, all students are encouraged to practice their right to file a grievance against another student freely.
  • STUDENTS UNDER THE INFLUENCE: On suspicion, the instructor reserves the right to approach intoxicated students under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances. Most likely, these students will be immediately sent home and reported to that OLC college center’s administrative personnel. Students are expected to perform academic assignments while sober, and alert. The teacher will approach a student about their online assignment submissions on suspicion of alcohol influence, use of illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances.
  • TOBACCO ON CAMPUS: The use of commercial chewing and/or smoking tobacco is absolutely prohibited at all OLC college centers as well as inside the classrooms (whether class is in session or otherwise).
  • GUN-FREE/WEAPON-FREE CAMPUS: Oglala Lakota College will adhere to a Gun-Free/Weapon-Free campus policy. All dangerous weapons, (dangerous weapons are defined as any firearm, knife, or device, instruments, materials, or substances, whether animate or inanimate which is calculated to inflict death or serious bodily harm) are banned from the Oglala Lakota College campus and properties. Weapons brought onto or carried on Oglala Lakota College property must have prior approval and conform to the safety regulations identified in the procedures below. Weapons carried by authorized law enforcement agents or used in military activities are exempt.
  • DISABILITY: If you feel you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at (605)455-6040. I am happily always ready to offer any assistance as your teacher to ensure your well being :o)  
  • See OLC 2010-2011 Catalog, AND OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner.
  • CHILDREN: As OLC college center policy states, children of students are not permitted in class while it is in session. Please make arrangements for their care outside class. While children are a blessing, there is no facility available that allows children to be present in classes with their parent(s). I am absolutely strict with this rule. Students who must leave or be absent from class due to child issues will be marked absent for that day/evening. Situation approached on a case by case basis.

*As situations not listed above arise, other codes of conduct, conduct resolutions, etc. will be utilized. Teacher reserves the right to combine the above words and OLC 2010-2011 Catalog  &  OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner policies, OLC Policy and Procedure Manual links on the college website (http://www.olc.edu/about/governance/), as well as OLC Administrative personnel regarding class & student conduct along with other aspects listed in this syllabus as deemed necessary (e.g., Academic Integrity & Plagiarism, Policies on Plagiarism or Cheating, etc. ).

 

  • Additional Instructional Methodology:

Instruction of this class is accomplished through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and physical involvement by the student.  Students will read chapters and handouts that pertain to the objectives pertinent to the assignment and then be asked to explain or demonstrate the outcome. Visual aides such as DVD’s, video tapes, and display board presentations will be utilized. Guest speakers will be invited to talk to the class when appropriate.

·                Academic Freedom in Learning:

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled. Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

  • ADA Statement:

The Humanities and  Social Sciences Department is reading-intensive, and you need to be able to read as much as 40 pages a week for this class.  You also need to be able to express yourself, both in writing and during class time.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please talk to the Instructor.  You may also contact Lenora Hudson at 605-455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs. If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

 

Learning Objectives: The Humanities and Social Sciences department has adopted the following objectives WHEN NEEDED & WHEN APPROPRIATE:

  1. The ability to identify, define, solve, & reflect on situations found in painting. (Critical Thinking)
  2. The ability to locate and evaluate information utilizing some current technology. (Research and Writing)
  3. The ability to communicate with accuracy and clarity. (Speaking, Writing, Thinking of Painting Artists)
  4. The ability to read, comprehend, retain, apply and utilize sources of information responsibly. (Reading and Writing)
  5. Develop an understanding of Lakota culture and philosophy within the broader context of a diverse global society.

Oglala Lakota College has adopted the improvement of student learning as an integral purpose related to students’ learning objectives. Additionally, the OLC Humanities and Social Sciences Department encourages this fundamental belief within its ART 223: Painting I course. As a result of the reflective process each student undergoes, students will have the opportunity to develop an enhanced understanding of the integral aspect of the “human & artful experience”.

Student Responsibilities and Special Course Requirements: Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including ART 223 PAINTING I. Each student will retain a personal copy of all of her/his activity and assignment materials for her/his course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity and assignment as this course progresses.

 

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current OLC college catalog states:

“Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty”. (10)

 

POLICIES ON PLAGIARISM OR CHEATING IN RELATION TO RELEVANT WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation (a form of acknowledgement). REMEMBER: Art Work can be plagiarized.

 

Although a person may give her/his permission to you to utilize her/his words or ideas, it is plagiarism unless you credit her/him for the specific idea or words. You are responsible for understanding plagiarism. Contact me with any questions you may have.

 

WRITING: Most cases of plagiarism are the result of improper citation or utilization of punctuation (quotation marks) and can be easily avoided. We will utilize the current MLA style manual for this course (I have a copy of MLA style). If you are unfamiliar with it or have forgotten how to utilize the MLA formats, contact me immediately and I can provide you with several sources. However, ENG 103 is a prerequisite for this course already.

*On suspicion of cheating and/or plagiarism, the teacher reserves the right to search online for works  from the student’s assignment submission, and to also require the student to redraw the same assignment (or another work) while the teacher is physically present. The teacher also has the right to suspect then privately approach any student if cheating and/or plagiarism is sensed.

Course Geography: Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments. This will require your weekly participation throughout the semester. Class discussions should include substantive input from each student each week.

 

Course Assignments: There will be a variety of drawing activities/assignments as the course progresses. Quizzes and additional activities (discussions, presentations, new drawing methods at the advanced Drawing II level, etc.) should be anticipated. I may retain all written student work in portfolios as well as a record of your completed & comprehended assignments.  ALL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS.

 

PARTICIPATION STANDARD/COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS:

OLC’s institutional attendance policy is outlined on page 13 of the current catalog which states:

Students are required to attend class regularly. If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor. At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. An excused absence is counted in a student’s total number of absences. A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences at the discretion of the instructor and district director and will be dropped after five total absences. The instructor must submit a drop card by the 15th week or a letter grade.

Additionally, in this course, 2 tardies (consecutive or not) equate one absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class WEEKLY throughout the semester by demonstrating and exhibiting a tertiary level (at the very least) of weekly class involvement having read & screened all assigned materials.

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises. 
  • Normally, missed classes CANNOT BE MADE UP for this course. Prompt & consistent attendance is required.
  • Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.
  • Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:
    • Three (3) ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) in a row constitutes an automatic drop.
    • Five (5) scattered ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).
    • Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded (see below). Further, 2 tardies = 1 absence in my class.
    • All ABSENCES – EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED – will be used to drop each student who has exceeded absences by OLC Registrar. Once a student is dropped, they CANNOT be reinstated (OLC Registrar policy/Dept. of Education).
    • Students must not exceed ‘break time’ past the regulated 15 minutes class recess block.
    • Both Absences & Tardies result in student points deletion
    • The instructor will decide whether or not an ABSENCE is Excused or Unexcused.
    • Class begins promptly on the hour. Students who arrive 1 minute past the set time will be marked TARDY.
    • Students who arrive after the first hour of class are considered ABSENT for the day.
    • Students who leave class before the designated end time without my authorization are considered ABSENT for the day. Informing me (the instructor) of your absence does not equate an ‘excused’ absence.
    • Students will lose points when TARDY, ABSENT, or when not working during their presence in class.
    • Attendance is recorded by me (the instructor) at the beginning of class, and is the first task upon commencement of class time.
  • If you must miss a class in case of an emergency, you should call or email the instructor, and pick up assignments from my box at the college center, or utilize other methods of correspondence in regards to make-up work. Do not call to speak to me once class for the day/evening has begun (9am/1pm/5pm). If you are to be late, or absent for class, please leave a polite message with the college center staff, & leave the message(s) by at least 15 minutes before class begins. Please be considerate.
  • Early leave from class (unannounced and/or not authorized by the instructor) is considered an absence for the day. Also, if you announce or inform me that you will leave prior to the completion of class (12noon/4pm/8pm), it may also be considered an absence. Please inform me via email or by phone ahead of time (15 minutes before class begins) to discuss. Please be considerate.
  • You should also be aware that drops from my class will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.
  • At an announced point in time during the semester, the OLC Registrar’s office will drop you from courses if class absences are exceeded. Instructors no longer have the initial control on the OLC Jenzabar site in this regard – EXCUSED ABSENCES also result in OLC Registrar’s Office officially dropping you from class.

 

  • Incompletes:An incomplete grade is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.  Not turning work in on time is no excuse.

 

Feedback Schedule: I hope to provide you feedback the day(s)/week(s) following the submission of an assignment. I will be checking my OLC email (gcournoyer@olc.edu) frequently throughout the week. I will also utilize your OLC email address to communicate with you, & am open to use your other email addresses to correspond with you if needed.

 

Course Procedures and Policies on Late Assignments:

 Late Work will receive one of the two following grades:

3.               The grade the work actually deserves.

4.               The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Methods for Delivering Assignments: Each assignment should be submitted by the student (herself/himself). There may be circumstances which may require a student to submit an assignment in an alternative manner; however, the alternative delivery should be discussed with me before the assignment’s due date. You need to retain a copy of all of your activities and assignments. I should never have the only copy of anything (consider a USB flash drive and/or a CD that archives your work).

QUIZZES: Quizzes are held at the very beginning of class immediately following attendance/roll call. Quizzes cannot be made up once completed (as many of them are ORAL/VERBAL due to line memorization for parts from a particular speech, while written are to ensure that textbook reading has been completed & comprehended by the start of every class period). Points accumulated during quizzes will be used toward your final grade. Some of the main purposes of quizzing students is to more further: combat tardiness, enforce the reading assignments from the previous week, aid students in point accumulation, as well as help them hone in on their acting ‘chops’/expressive craft. Quizzes in this class are based on PAINTING techniques and will show if a student has practiced their PAINTING methods consistently while outside of class.

 

MIDTERM & FINAL EXAMS: TBD

 

RESEARCH: While there is no formal research/term paper assigned for this course, students have the option in discussing with me the possibilities of composing one.

 

NOTE ON PEER REVIEW: While it would behoove you to allow another person to review & critique your performative assignments, I am highly concerned about whom you allow to do so. Please choose a reviewer who is well informed, truly experienced, & positive of the Art 223 PAINTING I level expectation. I strongly suggest you choose an experienced tutor to review your work. However, it is helpful to kindly ask and involve friends and family members to help with inspirational critique :o)

Course Evaluation: I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation distributed at the end of the course. Ideally, this activity will be completed during week thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: At the very least, this course will utilize the drawing standards used in the Art 223 Painting I course as far as skill and criteria are concerned.

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Only students that complete this course with a letter grade of ‘B’ will be allowed LORs, or letters of recommendation.

 

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus is, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered an inflexible ‘contract’ between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

 

Aug 31st

Introduction of syllabus

 

Sept 7th

Black & White Still Life

 

Sept 14th

Black & White Still Life

 

Sept 21st

Monochromatic Painting

 

Sept 28th

Monochromatic Painting

 

Oct 5th

Dyad Color Painting

 

Oct 12th

Dyad Color Painting

 

Oct 19th

Triad Color Painting

 

Oct 26th

Triad Color Painting

 

Nov 2nd

Tetrad Color Painting

 

Nov 9th

Tetrad Color Painting

 

Nov 16th

Warm and Cool Color Painting

 

 

Nov 23rd

Warm and Cool Color Painting

 

Nov 30th

Self Portrait

 

Dec 7th

Self Portrait

 

Dec 13-17th

Make up Week

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

        Revised

 

 

NEW Course Title:

Art 243 *Painting II

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 243 *Painting II

This course is designed for the art student who will advance in acrylic painting with an emphasis on studio production relevant to both basic elements and mastery of principles.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA  in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 223 Painting I

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART 243 PAINTING II – Oglala Lakota College

spring 20—

 

 

Class Time/Location: -- pm; Tuesday/Thursday

Instructor: Gerald Cournoyer, MFA

Office Hours/Location:  Tuesday/Thursday 11:00-12:00 or by appointment

Phone:  ---

Email: gcournoyer@olc.edu

 

Each student will turn in a 2 page written proposal describing the concept of their work during the semester.  During the semester we will work on producing an artist statement, biography and art resume.  Along with your final critique each student will need to turn in a CD of works completed this semester.

 

Course Description: ART 243 *Painting II - This course is designed for the art student who will advance in acrylic painting with an emphasis on studio production relevant to both basic elements and mastery of principles.

Office Hours:  Due to differing/conflicting student and instructor schedules, students are encouraged to approach the instructor as to when they would like to meet. All student-instructor meetings are confidential & held privately.

Prerequisites: TBD (having completed the prerequisite with a grade of ‘C’ or better).

Required Texts and Materials:  TBD

Reading Load: As accorded by the syllabus timeline found further on this syllabus, all students are required to complete readings as listed by instructor.

 

**Quizzes held at the beginning of each class to ensure assignments have been worked on.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To research and recognize appropriate material for each assigned in-class & out-of-class painting assignment.
  2. To further enhance the artistic expression of each student in painting and self confidence through this course.
  3. To analyze and assess the effectiveness of each student painting level in an appropriate manner.
  4. To enhance by practice all the drawing techniques offered in this course to the student by the student showing his/her understanding of several painting principles.
  5. To articulate the painting assignments with clarity of self creativity.
  6. To develop a space in the studio classroom that allows students to artistically release particular anxieties that may not be freely expressed in other outlets.
  7. To incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible within a performance.

 

Intended Outcomes:

17.   Students will learn how to research appropriate material for each painting assignment.

18.   Students will utilize course topic outlines suitable to each assigned piece.

19.   Students will comprehend how to analyze and assess the effectiveness of expressive emotion in PAINTING II in an appropriate manner (as to what each assignment calls for) utilizing newly taught then practiced drawing criteria learned.

20.   Students will be able to articulate each speech in a clear and understanding manner using mind and inspiration guided movement during a drawing session.

21.   Students will be able to incorporate the Lakota perspective whenever possible.

22.   Students will take this class as seriously as all other courses.

23.   Students will share in the vision that this class allows freedom of artistic expression through the PAINTING II level as a means of ‘safely’ dealing with life anxieties.

24.   Students will receive a passing grade of a C or better.

 

         

Evaluation and Markings (percentages):

In Class Activities...............................................30%

Quizzes & Homework Assignments...................................................20%

Final Test……………………………………….20%

Attendance (absences & tardies delete points)………………………30%

                        TOTAL…………………………100%

 

Grading Schedule for All Work and Grade Point Average

100-90       A                                            A= 4 grade pts

89-80         B                                            B= 3 grade pts.

79-70         C                                            C= 2 grade pts.

69-60         D                                            D= 1 grade pt.

59-0           F                                            F=  0 grade pts.

 

It is the student’s responsibility to make photocopies of all records of grades and papers in case of a grade disagreement.

 

Humanities Department Requirement: Each student must hand in a portfolio at the end of the semester.  Students will also take the SIRII  to evaluate the instructor.  Turn cell phones off in the class.   No IPods or Bluetooth Headsets or any other kinds of headsets or musical devices are allowed (anything that beeps, squawks, or vibrates).

 

LAKOTA PERSPECTIVE PROVIDED THROUGH, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Students are aware of their cultural identity.
  • Students will have a sense of Lakota and other indigenous people, and non-native history.
  • Students will have careers relevant to Liberal Arts which enhance and benefit life on and off the reservation.
  • Students will be prepared for graduate level work.
  • Students exhibit civic responsibility.

The Lakota perspective, especially the practice of Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi, is provided via the interaction between students and the instructor where the traditional Lakota values of patience, mutual respect, and honor are maintained. Students are expected to assist the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective within the scope of all of this course’s activities. It is heavily encouraged that student thought, expression, and discussions continually supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

 

CLASS & STUDENT CONDUCT (in relation to Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi):

  • Wolakolkiciyapi: Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage. If a student displays hostility, irrelevant & disruptive over-garrulousness, or other misconduct that is disturbing to his or her classmates and the instructor, the instructor will meet with that student privately to discuss the matter. Racial, and/or sexist slurs, jokes, teases, or other types of snide, hurtful, inappropriate , discriminatory,  bullying, or embarrassing remarks or actions performed in/out of class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff, & faculty are considered ‘student misconduct’. If misconduct persists, students may be approached by OLC administration. These comments can easily be considered threats which are grounds for expulsion from OLC and an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class. When students comment on the ‘uselessness’ of ART 243 PAINTING II, students should be prepared for me (instructor) to question them on the spot as to why they would thoughtlessly produce such shallow, unfounded comments.
  • CLASS DISRUPTIONS: Abrupt, random outbursts of loud garrulousness will not be tolerated (e.g., when speaking to me (the instructor), other students, staff, on the cell phone, passersby, etc.). Violent activities, loud music devices played at inappropriate times during class, noisy and late entrances into class once in session, hostile tones and comments/personalities, copying assigned work from another, incessant and disruptive movements, disruptive chatter amongst students who appear not to be attentive to lessons, etc., are not tolerated. NO TEXT MESSAGING ALLOWED during class. All cell phones and electronic devices used for communication not relevant to in-class lectures must be switched off or set to ‘silent’ or ‘vibrate’. Consistent in subordination of this rule will result in student’s deletion of points as penalty.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not tolerated within or without class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff & faculty either online, via email, by phone, vis-à-vis/in person, or by other modes of digital communication (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Bebo, Linked In, MySpace, iPod, iPod Touch, blogging, etc.). Since sexual harassment may be classified as a threat, a student can be immediately expelled from OLC. Additionally, a DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class will result. Sexual harassment is considered to be any of the following, but not limited to: unwanted touching of another’s body that causes the other’s discomfort; unwanted vocal, facial, or bodily expressions of an unwanted sexual nature from one student to another; any form of unwanted digital communication utilizing sexual denotational or connotational innuendo; sexual abuse of double entendres in any language; harmful teasing of one’s personal choice in sexual orientation (e.g., we will not use terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, ‘dyke’, ‘butch’, etc. in any harmful or uncomfortable way – therefore, the use of these terms is prohibited); inappropriate verbal or other use of body parts from one student to another; bullying of a student to date you or even ‘hang out’ with you;  ‘ogling’ of any form over another’s body and/or body parts inappropriately; sexual physical assault; date rape; use of pornographic images to approach another inappropriately; approaching another to pay for sexual favors; stalking; vocabulary that inappropriately privileges one gender or sex over the other; unwanted company; inappropriate approaching for a ‘date’; flirting to get your way; the meaning of ‘NO’; defamation; cyber bullying affiliated with sexual harassment; etc. Sexual harassment can be caused by, and happen to anyone regardless of race, gender, sex, status, age, etc.
  • THREATS, USE OF NEPOTISM, STUDENT INSUBORDINATION: While freedom of creative, thoughtful expression is absolutely encouraged in this course, I will not tolerate any form of insubordination, thoughtless insult, or any form of threat by students (e.g., threat to use a family relation or associate on the school, college center board, or political prestige as a way to bully or ‘corner’ the instructor or other students from progressing or exercising their rights enforced by OLC policy; physical or verbal threats imposed on others; gang related; family related; romantically linked, etc.). If a student feels that another in the class has displayed such hostility, the ‘accused’ will be privately approached by instructor for a resolution. If threats/insubordination persist, OLC administration will be prompted for possible and immediate expulsion from OLC as well as an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class (in concurrence with OLC policies for student grievance, disciplinary actions, etc.). A student’s personal expression of who they are NEVER LICENSES their right to impose upon another student, faculty, staff, administration, class guest, etc. According to OLC policy, all students are encouraged to practice their right to file a grievance against another student freely.
  • STUDENTS UNDER THE INFLUENCE: On suspicion, the instructor reserves the right to approach intoxicated students under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances. Most likely, these students will be immediately sent home and reported to that OLC college center’s administrative personnel. Students are expected to perform academic assignments while sober, and alert. The teacher will approach a student about their online assignment submissions on suspicion of alcohol influence, use of illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances.
  • TOBACCO ON CAMPUS: The use of commercial chewing and/or smoking tobacco is absolutely prohibited at all OLC college centers as well as inside the classrooms (whether class is in session or otherwise).
  • GUN-FREE/WEAPON-FREE CAMPUS: Oglala Lakota College will adhere to a Gun-Free/Weapon-Free campus policy. All dangerous weapons, (dangerous weapons are defined as any firearm, knife, or device, instruments, materials, or substances, whether animate or inanimate which is calculated to inflict death or serious bodily harm) are banned from the Oglala Lakota College campus and properties. Weapons brought onto or carried on Oglala Lakota College property must have prior approval and conform to the safety regulations identified in the procedures below. Weapons carried by authorized law enforcement agents or used in military activities are exempt.
  • DISABILITY: If you feel you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at (605)455-6040. I am happily always ready to offer any assistance as your teacher to ensure your well being :o)  
  • See OLC 2010-2011 Catalog, AND OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner.
  • CHILDREN: As OLC college center policy states, children of students are not permitted in class while it is in session. Please make arrangements for their care outside class. While children are a blessing, there is no facility available that allows children to be present in classes with their parent(s). I am absolutely strict with this rule. Students who must leave or be absent from class due to child issues will be marked absent for that day/evening. Situation approached on a case by case basis.

*As situations not listed above arise, other codes of conduct, conduct resolutions, etc. will be utilized. Teacher reserves the right to combine the above words and OLC 2010-2011 Catalog  &  OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner policies, OLC Policy and Procedure Manual links on the college website (http://www.olc.edu/about/governance/), as well as OLC Administrative personnel regarding class & student conduct along with other aspects listed in this syllabus as deemed necessary (e.g., Academic Integrity & Plagiarism, Policies on Plagiarism or Cheating, etc. ).

 

  • Additional Instructional Methodology:

Instruction of this class is accomplished through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and physical involvement by the student.  Students will read chapters and handouts that pertain to the objectives pertinent to the assignment and then be asked to explain or demonstrate the outcome. Visual aides such as DVD’s, video tapes, and display board presentations will be utilized. Guest speakers will be invited to talk to the class when appropriate.

·                Academic Freedom in Learning:

Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance may be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled. Students who believe that an academic evaluation reflects prejudiced or capricious consideration of student opinions or conduct unrelated to academic standards should first contact the instructor of the course to initiate a review of the evaluation.  If the student remains unsatisfied, the student may contact the department head and/or dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

  • ADA Statement:

The Humanities and  Social Sciences Department is reading-intensive, and you need to be able to read as much as 40 pages a week for this class.  You also need to be able to express yourself, both in writing and during class time.  If you have a disability that prevents you from taking part in any of these activities, please talk to the Instructor.  You may also contact Lenora Hudson at 605-455-6040.  Do this as soon as possible, so we can make arrangements to fit your needs. If you’re not sure if your writing or reading skills are sufficient for this course, please see me immediately, so we can determine whether you need assistance to do well.  If you are having problems with the material during the semester, please contact me right away.

Learning Objectives: The Humanities and Social Sciences department has adopted the following objectives WHEN NEEDED & WHEN APPROPRIATE:

  1. The ability to identify, define, solve, & reflect on situations found in painting. (Critical Thinking)
  2. The ability to locate and evaluate information utilizing some current technology. (Research and Writing)
  3. The ability to communicate with accuracy and clarity. (Speaking, Writing, Thinking of Painting Artists)
  4. The ability to read, comprehend, retain, apply and utilize sources of information responsibly. (Reading and Writing)
  5. Develop an understanding of Lakota culture and philosophy within the broader context of a diverse global society.

Oglala Lakota College has adopted the improvement of student learning as an integral purpose related to students’ learning objectives. Additionally, the OLC Humanities and Social Sciences Department encourages this fundamental belief within its ART 243: Painting II course. As a result of the reflective process each student undergoes, students will have the opportunity to develop an enhanced understanding of the integral aspect of the “human & artful experience”.

Student Responsibilities and Special Course Requirements: Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including ART 243 PAINTING II. Each student will retain a personal copy of all of her/his activity and assignment materials for her/his course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity and assignment as this course progresses.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current OLC college catalog states:

“Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty”. (10)

POLICIES ON PLAGIARISM OR CHEATING IN RELATION TO RELEVANT WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation (a form of acknowledgement). REMEMBER: Art Work can be plagiarized.

 

Although a person may give her/his permission to you to utilize her/his words or ideas, it is plagiarism unless you credit her/him for the specific idea or words. You are responsible for understanding plagiarism. Contact me with any questions you may have. WRITING: Most cases of plagiarism are the result of improper citation or utilization of punctuation (quotation marks) and can be easily avoided. We will utilize the current MLA style manual for this course (I have a copy of MLA style). If you are unfamiliar with it or have forgotten how to utilize the MLA formats, contact me immediately and I can provide you with several sources.

 

*On suspicion of cheating and/or plagiarism, the teacher reserves the right to search online for works  from the student’s assignment submission, and to also require the student to redraw the same assignment (or another work) while the teacher is physically present. The teacher also has the right to suspect then privately approach any student if cheating and/or plagiarism is sensed.

 

Course Geography: Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments. This will require your weekly participation throughout the semester. Class discussions should include substantive input from each student each week.

 

Course Assignments: There will be a variety of drawing activities/assignments as the course progresses. Quizzes and additional activities (discussions, presentations, new drawing methods at the advanced Drawing II level, etc.) should be anticipated. I may retain all written student work in portfolios as well as a record of your completed & comprehended assignments.  ALL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS.

 

PARTICIPATION STANDARD/COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS:

OLC’s institutional attendance policy is outlined on page 13 of the current catalog which states:

Students are required to attend class regularly. If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor. At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. An excused absence is counted in a student’s total number of absences. A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences at the discretion of the instructor and district director and will be dropped after five total absences. The instructor must submit a drop card by the 15th week or a letter grade.

Additionally, in this course, 2 tardies (consecutive or not) equate one absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class WEEKLY throughout the semester by demonstrating and exhibiting a tertiary level (at the very least) of weekly class involvement having read & screened all assigned materials.

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises. 
  • Normally, missed classes CANNOT BE MADE UP for this course. Prompt & consistent attendance is required.
  • Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.
  • Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:
    • Three (3) ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) in a row constitutes an automatic drop.
    • Five (5) scattered ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).
    • Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded (see below). Further, 2 tardies = 1 absence in my class.
    • All ABSENCES – EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED – will be used to drop each student who has exceeded absences by OLC Registrar. Once a student is dropped, they CANNOT be reinstated (OLC Registrar policy/Dept. of Education).
    • Students must not exceed ‘break time’ past the regulated 15 minutes class recess block.
    • Both Absences & Tardies result in student points deletion
    • The instructor will decide whether or not an ABSENCE is Excused or Unexcused.
    • Class begins promptly on the hour. Students who arrive 1 minute past the set time will be marked TARDY.
    • Students who arrive after the first hour of class are considered ABSENT for the day.
    • Students who leave class before the designated end time without my authorization are considered ABSENT for the day. Informing me (the instructor) of your absence does not equate an ‘excused’ absence.
    • Students will lose points when TARDY, ABSENT, or when not working during their presence in class.
    • Attendance is recorded by me (the instructor) at the beginning of class, and is the first task upon commencement of class time.
  • If you must miss a class in case of an emergency, you should call or email the instructor, and pick up assignments from my box at the college center, or utilize other methods of correspondence in regards to make-up work. Do not call to speak to me once class for the day/evening has begun (9am/1pm/5pm). If you are to be late, or absent for class, please leave a polite message with the college center staff, & leave the message(s) by at least 15 minutes before class begins. Please be considerate.
  • Early leave from class (unannounced and/or not authorized by the instructor) is considered an absence for the day. Also, if you announce or inform me that you will leave prior to the completion of class (12noon/4pm/8pm), it may also be considered an absence. Please inform me via email or by phone ahead of time (15 minutes before class begins) to discuss. Please be considerate.
  • You should also be aware that drops from my class will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.
  • At an announced point in time during the semester, the OLC Registrar’s office will drop you from courses if class absences are exceeded. Instructors no longer have the initial control on the OLC Jenzabar site in this regard – EXCUSED ABSENCES also result in OLC Registrar’s Office officially dropping you from class.

 

  • Incompletes:An incomplete grade is given only when the instructor feels special circumstances warrant it.  Not turning work in on time is no excuse.

 

Feedback Schedule: I hope to provide you feedback the day(s)/week(s) following the submission of an assignment. I will be checking my OLC email (gcournoyer@olc.edu) frequently throughout the week. I will also utilize your OLC email address to communicate with you, & am open to use your other email addresses to correspond with you if needed.

 

Course Procedures and Policies on Late Assignments:

 Late Work will receive one of the two following grades:

5.               The grade the work actually deserves.

6.               The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Methods for Delivering Assignments: Each assignment should be submitted by the student (herself/himself). There may be circumstances which may require a student to submit an assignment in an alternative manner; however, the alternative delivery should be discussed with me before the assignment’s due date. You need to retain a copy of all of your activities and assignments. I should never have the only copy of anything (consider a USB flash drive and/or a CD that archives your work).

 

QUIZZES: Quizzes are held at the very beginning of class immediately following attendance/roll call. Quizzes cannot be made up once completed (as many of them are ORAL/VERBAL due to line memorization for parts from a particular speech, while written are to ensure that textbook reading has been completed & comprehended by the start of every class period). Points accumulated during quizzes will be used toward your final grade. Some of the main purposes of quizzing students is to more further: combat tardiness, enforce the reading assignments from the previous week, aid students in point accumulation, as well as help them hone in on their acting ‘chops’/expressive craft. Quizzes in this class are based on PAINTING techniques and will show if a student has practiced their Drawing methods consistently while outside of class.

 

MIDTERM & FINAL EXAMS: TBD

 

RESEARCH: While there is no formal research/term paper assigned for this course, students have the option in discussing with me the possibilities of composing one.

 

NOTE ON PEER REVIEW: While it would behoove you to allow another person to review & critique your performative assignments, I am highly concerned about whom you allow to do so. Please choose a reviewer who is well informed, truly experienced, & positive of the Art 243 PAINTING II level expectation. I strongly suggest you choose an experienced tutor to review your work. However, it is helpful to kindly ask and involve friends and family members to help with inspirational critique :o)

Course Evaluation: I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation distributed at the end of the course. Ideally, this activity will be completed during week thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: At the very least, this course will utilize the drawing standards used in the Art 223 Painting I course as far as skill and criteria are concerned.

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Only students that complete this course with a letter grade of ‘B’ will be allowed LORs, or letters of recommendation.

 

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus is, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered an inflexible ‘contract’ between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

Tentative Schedule

Week 1           Jan 16-18

Introduction to course: Course Requirements, Policies and Procedures, Required Supplies

DUE: 2 page written proposal

Week 2           Jan 23-25

 Week 3          Jan 30-Feb 1

n-class Critiue

Week 4           Feb 6-8

Week 5           Feb 13-15

Week 6           Feb 20-22

In-class Critique

Week 7           Feb 27-Mar 1

Week 8           Mar 6-8  

Mid-Term Review

Bring all work to class for one on one critique with the instructor. All works should be in a portfolio, marked with your name and Spring 07.

Week 9           Mar 13-15

In-class Critique

Week 10         Mar 20-22      SPRING BREAK

Week 11         r 27-29

Week 12         Apr 3-5

In-class Critique

Week 13         Apr 10-12

Week 14         Apr 17-19

Week 15         Apr 24-26

work on Final Portfolio

Week 16         May 1-3

End of Semester Portfolio Review

Turn in CD of work from semester


Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

        Revised

 

 

NEW Course Title:

Art 253 *Graphic Arts Digital

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 253 *Graphic Arts Digital

This course is designed for the art student to learn basic technological graphic design software applications such as Adobe PhotoShop, Mac iMovie, iPod Applications, Adobe Illustrator amongst others.

 

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 123: Two-Dimensional Design

 

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oglala Lakota College - Humanities Department

ART 253: Introduction to Graphic Arts Digital

 

 

SEMESTER:                                                                CREDITS:       3 credits

 

LOCATION:

 

DAY:                                                                          TIME:

 

INSTRUCTOR:

 

OFFICE:

 

HOURS:

 

PHONES:                               Office                                                 Cell

 

EMAIL ADDRESS:

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ART 253 *Graphic Arts Digital

This course is designed for the art student to learn basic technological graphic design software applications such as Adobe PhotoShop, Mac iMovie, iPod Applications, Adobe Illustrator amongst others. Additionally, this beginning course will cover an introduction to visual communication theory and practice: elements and principles of perception and design, typography, symbols, desktop design

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

1.         Understanding and development of basic typographical and layout concepts

2.       Understanding of basic principles of design and perception, and their use in graphic design

3.       Basic understanding of common graphic design software and its usage, and digital hardware as it relates to graphic design

 

PREREQUISTE:

 

REQUIRED TEXT: Lupton, Ellen and Phillips, Jennifer. Graphic Design The New Basics. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2008.

 

Lupton, Ellen. Thinking With Type. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004.

Elam, Kimberly. Grid Systems. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2005.

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS: Other books and handouts may be recommended/assigned during the semester.

 

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

Notebook/Sketchbook

Storage Media (flash drive, USB drive)

Other supplies may be needed during the semester

 

 

 

ATTENDANCE:

1)       This class meets once a week for three (3) hours. Students are required to attend every class

2)     Attendance requirements will follow OLC’s attendance policy. The students may be dropped after 3 consecutive absences

3)     Students who have accumulated 5 absences or a total of 15 hours will be dropped

4)     If for some reason a student chooses to drop this class, it is the student’s responsibility to fill out a drop card or notify the instructor, center staff, or registrar, at which time a drop card may be filled out for the student by the contacted person. Failure to follow this procedure will result in a grade of “F” at the end of the semester.

5)     It must be noted any student who misses even three of four classes will find it difficult to achieve success in this course.

6)     If a student misses a class, it is the student’s responsibility to get the notes and assignments covered on the day of the absence.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS:

1)       Attend all classes

2)     Read all assigned chapters in text and any extra class handouts

3)     Complete all assigned projects

4)     Participate in classroom critiques

5)     Take notes

 

EVALUATION: Each project must be completed on time. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of class. Your work will be assessed the day of the critique. If the work is unfinished, you must present it as it is and it will be graded at that point. Deadlines are a part of an artist life. All students are required to keep a sketchbook that should contain research notes and sources, project ideas, drawings, observations, printouts, etc. Your sketchbook should be with you at every class so we can discuss your problems from a visual base.

 

The letter grade I give will be based on:

• creativity - openness to experimentation with materials and thought processes

• concept - the context and content of your work developed from research

• craftsmanship - attention to details, consistency and structural integrity

• execution - coming to class prepared to work and at least 4 hours a week outside of class

• presentation - how the work is presented for the critique and what you have to say about it

 

Project(s)               50 points each                        A = 90 – 100 points   

Midterm                 25 points                                  B = 80 – 89   points

Final                      25 points                                  C = 70 – 79   points

                                                                                          D = 60 – 69   points

                                                                                          F =   0 – 59   points

 

LAKOTA PRESPECTIVE: The Lakota perspective will be provided by way of daily interactions between student and instructor where traditional Lakota values such as patience, respect, and honor will be maintained. The student will be expected to aid the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE:

This is an approximate schedule, and may change as the semester proceeds.

 

Week One – Observing point, line and plane

 

Week Two – Symmetry & Asymmetry

 

Week Three - Overlapping typefaces

 

Week Four – Scale, depth and motion

 

Week Five – Color: Selective emphasis

 

Week Six – Letterform abstraction

 

Week Seven – Five squares eight inches

 

Week Eight – Type speccing

 

Week Nine – Layers: Combine and contrast

 

Week Ten – Grids: Organizing form and content

 

Week Eleven – One Element, Many Patterns

 

Week Twelve

 

Week Thirteen –

 

Week Fourteen –

 

Week Fifteen – Final Project Due

 

 

DISCLAIMER: Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make changes in course content or instructional technique without notice or obligation.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.

 


 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

        Revised

 

NEW Course Title:

Art 263 *Digital Photography

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 263 *Digital Photography

This course is designed for students who would like to learn basic techniques with the digital camera and many of its built-in devices.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 233: Three-Dimensional Design

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oglala Lakota College - Humanities Department

ART 263: Introduction to

Digital Photography

 

 

SEMESTER:                                                                                     CREDITS:          3 credits

LOCATION:

DAY:                                                                                                    TIME:

INSTRUCTOR:

OFFICE:

HOURS:

PHONES:                                        

Office                                                                 

Cell

EMAIL ADDRESS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ART 263 *Digital Photography

This course is designed for students who would like to learn basic techniques with the digital camera and many of its built in devices. Further, this course introduces the student to the fundamentals of digital photography. The student will operate a digital camera to create images and use software applications to incorporate them into graphic design layouts.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

4.      Understand the basics of digital still camera operation

5.      Be able to use a digital still camera to capture images

6.      Incorporate there images with computer software applications to create original designs

 

PREREQUISTIE:

 

REQUIRED TEXT: Mastering Digital Photography by David D. Busch. Muska & Lipman

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS: Other books and handouts may be recommended/assigned during the semester.

 

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

Jump drive/flash drive

Notebook

Sketchbook

Pens and Pencils

 

INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS:  This class will consist of lecture and demonstration re-enforced through computer based assignments. Skills will be developed and demonstrated through the execution of computer based projects. Works will be critiqued in class to enhance the implementation of art and design theory and the development of technical, creative and analytical skills.

 

ATTENDANCE:

7)      This class meets once a week for three (3) hours. Students are required to attend every class

8)      Attendance requirements will follow OLC’s attendance policy. The students may be dropped after 3 consecutive absences

9)      Students who have accumulated 5 absences or a total of 15 hours will be dropped

10)  If for some reason a student chooses to drop this class, it is the student’s responsibility to fill out a drop card or notify the instructor, center staff, or registrar, at which time a drop card may be filled out for the student by the contacted person. Failure to follow this procedure will result in a grade of “F” at the end of the semester.

11)   It must be noted any student who misses even three of four classes will find it difficult to achieve success in this course.

12)  If a student misses a class, it is the student’s responsibility to get the notes and assignments covered on the day of the absence.

 

REQUIREMENTS:

6)      Attend all classes

7)      Read all assigned chapters in text and any extra class handouts

8)      Complete all assigned projects

9)      Participate in classroom critiques

10)  Take notes

 

EVALUATION: Each project must be completed on time. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of class. Your work will be assessed the day of the critique. If the work is unfinished, you must present it as it is and it will be graded at that point. Deadlines are a part of an artist life. All students are required to keep a sketchbook that should contain research notes and sources, project ideas, drawings, observations, printouts, etc. Your sketchbook should be with you at every class so we can discuss your problems from a visual base.

 

The letter grade I give will be based on:

• creativity - openness to experimentation with materials and thought processes

• concept - the context and content of your work developed from research

• craftsmanship - attention to details, consistency and structural integrity

• execution - coming to class prepared to work and at least 4 hours a week outside of class

• presentation - how the work is presented for the critique and what you have to say about it

 

Project(s)                   50 points each                                A = 90 – 100 points      

Midterm                     25 points                                            B = 80 – 89   points

Final                             25 points                                            C = 70 – 79   points

                                                                                                                        D = 60 – 69   points

                                                                                                                        F =   0 – 59   points

 

LAKOTA PRESPECTIVE: The Lakota perspective will be provided by way of daily interactions between student and instructor where traditional Lakota values such as patience, respect, and honor will be maintained. The student will be expected to aid the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE:

This is an approximate schedule, and may change as the semester proceeds.

 

Week One: Overview, photo terminology, using the camera 101, making seamless textures with Photoshop

 

Week Two: Composing through the viewfinder, F-stop, aperture, depth of field, print ads

 

Week Three: Motion, Creative direction, Lighting

 

Week Four: Perspective, Importing images into a page layout program

 

Week Five: Ad layout

 

Week Six: Project 1 due; critique. Landscapes

 

Week Seven: Portraits, Portraits photo shoot for movie poster

 

Week Eight: Macro photography

 

Week Nine: Editorial photography

 

Week Ten: Architectural photography

 

Week Eleven: Begin editorial project

 

Week Twelve: Project 2 due; critique

 

Week Thirteen: Abstraction

 

Week Fourteen: Work on editorial project

 

Week Fifteen: Final critique

 

DISCLAIMER: Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make changes in course content or instructional technique without notice or obligation.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

    X    Revised (Course Number & Course Description)

 

OLD Course Title:

Art 163: Introduction to Sculpture

 

--

 

NEW Course Title (Note Course # Change as well):

Art 273: *Introduction to Sculpture

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 273: *Introduction to Sculpture

This course is an introduction to sculptural tools, materials, and processes.  Students will experience both the additive and the subtractive processes using materials such as wood, clay, and plaster. 

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 173: Introduction to Ceramics

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oglala Lakota College - Humanities Department

ART 273: INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE

 

SEMESTER:                                            

CREDITS: 3

LOCATION:

DAY:                                                          

TIME:

INSTRUCTOR:

OFFICE:

HOURS:

PHONES:                    

·        Office                                            

·        Cell

EMAIL ADDRESS:

 

ART 273 INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE - COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is an introduction to sculptural tools, materials, and processes.  Students will experience both the additive and the subtractive processes using materials such as wood, clay, and plaster.  Additionally, This beginning course offers an introduction to basic sculptural approaches, concepts, and techniques. Students experiment with additive and subtractive processes in clay, plaster, wood, or stone to learn a variety of construction techniques. This course focuses on developing skills and fabrication solutions in three-dimensional form, with an emphasis on the safe use of materials and power and had tools. Project research requires the use of library resources.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

1. Create artwork using various demonstrated techniques and processes.

2. Evaluate the artwork of other students during the class during critique using terms and concepts appropriate to the medium.

3. Explain and defend concepts and choices related to the work produced by the class during critique.

 

PREREQUISTE:

 

REQUIRED TEXT: TBD

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS:  TBD

 

 

 

 

 

ATTENDANCE:

13)                      This class meets once a week for three (3) hours. Students are required to attend every class

14)                      Attendance requirements will follow OLC’s attendance policy. The students may be dropped after 3 consecutive absences

15)                      Students who have accumulated 5 absences or a total of 15 hours will be dropped

16)                      If for some reason a student chooses to drop this class, it is the student’s responsibility to fill out a drop card or notify the instructor, center staff, or registrar, at which time a drop card may be filled out for the student by the contacted person. Failure to follow this procedure will result in a grade of “F” at the end of the semester.

17)                      It must be noted any student who misses even three of four classes will find it difficult to achieve success in this course.

18)                      If a student misses a class, it is the student’s responsibility to get the notes and assignments covered on the day of the absence.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS:

11)                      Attend all classes

12)                      Read all assigned chapters in text and any extra class handouts

13)                      Complete all assigned projects

14)                      Participate in classroom critiques

15)                      Take notes

 

EVALUATION: Each project must be completed on time. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of class. Your work will be assessed the day of the critique. If the work is unfinished, you must present it as it is and it will be graded at that point. Deadlines are a part of an artist life. All students are required to keep a sketchbook that should contain research notes and sources, project ideas, drawings, observations, printouts, etc. Your sketchbook should be with you at every class so we can discuss your problems from a visual base.

 

The letter grade I give will be based on:

• creativity - openness to experimentation with materials and thought processes

• concept - the context and content of your work developed from research

• craftsmanship - attention to details, consistency and structural integrity

• execution - coming to class prepared to work and at least 4 hours a week outside of class

• presentation - how the work is presented for the critique and what you have to say about it

 

Project(s)       50 points each                A = 90 – 100 points    

Midterm                        25 points                           B = 80 – 89   points

Final                   25 points                           C = 70 – 79   points

                                                                        D = 60 – 69   points

                                                                                          F =   0 – 59   points

 

LAKOTA PRESPECTIVE: The Lakota perspective will be provided by way of daily interactions between student and instructor where traditional Lakota values such as patience, respect, and honor will be maintained. The student will be expected to aid the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE:

This is an approximate schedule, and may change as the semester proceeds.

 

Week One – Introduction to the course, discussion of syllabus

Assignment #1 Form and Space, sculptural assemblage addressing positive and negative space

 

Week Two – Discuss drawings for assignment #1. Slide presentation: “Rhythm and Repetition” - assignment #2, “Rhythm and Repetition” – assemblage sculpture emphasizing these concepts.

 

Week Three (#1 assignment due) – Discuss drawings for assignment #2, continue working on assignment #2

 

Week Four – Slide discussion “Visual Radiation and Gesture” – assignment #3 “Radiation and Gesture” – sculpture emphasizing these concepts.

 

Week Five (#2 assignment due) – Discuss drawings for assignment #3 sculpture. Slide discussion: “Mass, Balance, and Gravity” – assignment #4, sculpture emphasizing these concepts. Work on assignment #3 and drawings for assignment #4.

 

Week Six – Discuss drawings for assignment #4. Work on assignments #3 and #4.

 

Week Seven – (#3 assignment due) – Slide discussion “Motion in Art and Design” – assignment #5. “Kinetic Art”- mobile or stabile emphasizing activated space, static and dynamic form in space, kinetics. Work on assignment #4, drawings/concepts for assignment #5.

 

Week Eight (#4 assignment due) – Discussion of drawings/concepts for assignment #5. Work on assignment #5

 

Week Nine – Slide discussion “Sculptural Narrative Collection” assignment #6, Sculptural presentation of a narrative collection of objects. Work assignment #5, drawing/concepts for assignment #6.

 

Week Ten (#5 assignment due) – Discuss drawings/concepts for assignment #6, slide discussion “Installation Art” – assignment #8 final project – “Sculptural Installation” Work on assignment #6 and #7

 

Week Eleven – Discuss concepts for assignment #7. Work on assignment #6 and #7.

 

Week Twelve (#6 assignment due) – Work on assignment #7

 

Week Thirteen – Work on assignment #7 and #8

 

Week Fourteen – (#7 assignment due)

 

Week Fifteen - #8 assignment due (Final Project), Critique of installation.

 

DISCLAIMER: Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make changes in course content or instructional technique without notice or obligation.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.

 


Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   X    New          

        Revised

 

 

NEW Course Title:

Art 283: *Introduction to Printmaking

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 283: *Introduction to Printmaking

This course is designed as a basic introduction to printmaking with linoleum, wood, copper, screen printing, and other such materials.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

Enhancement of AA in Art Degree dependent upon this new course addition (amongst others).

 

 

College Requirements Affected:

Additional options for (section) III. Art Requirements (30 credits minimum) on revised Status Sheet for AA in Art Degree.

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites: 

Art 233: Three-Dimensional Design

 

(If new course, attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1, attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oglala Lakota College - Humanities Department

ART 283: Introduction to Printmaking

 

 

SEMESTER:                                                 

CREDITS:     3

LOCATION:

DAY:                                                          

TIME:

INSTRUCTOR:

OFFICE:

HOURS:

PHONES:                       

·       Office                                               

·       Cell

EMAIL ADDRESS:

ART 283 INTRO TO PRINTMAKING COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed as a basic introduction to printmaking with linoleum, wood, copper, screen printing, and other such materials. It is also an introduction to printmaking processes and the creation of multiple images. Experimental techniques, conceptualization and studio practice are

emphasized.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

1. To understand relief printing, etching, drypoint, collagraph, and monotype.

2. To understand paper registration, press operation, and general instruction and orientation to the printmaking facility.

3. To understand how to print an edition and prepare prints for presentation using archival materials.

4. To understand the printmaking processes to develop imagery; aesthetic issues which incorporate basic principles of drawing and 2-D design.

5. To understand printmaking vocabulary.

 

PREREQUISTE:

 

REQUIRED TEXT: The Complete Printmaker: Techniques, Traditions, Innovations

by John Ross, Clare Romano, and Tim Ross

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS:

Relief Printmaking - Clemson; Collagraph Printmaking-Wenninger; The Art of the Print -

Eichenberg; Printmaking: History&Process - Saff and Saccilotto; Monotype: Mediums and

Methods for Painterly Printmaking - Julia Ayres, Structure of the Visual Book- Smith, Hand

Bookbinding, A Manual of Instruction – Aldren Watson, Japanese Bookbinding, Instructions

from a Master Craftsman - Kojiro Ikegami; Etching, Engraving and other Intaglio Techniques –

Leaf; The Complete Manual of Relief Printmaking – Clemson and Simmons

 

ATTENDANCE:

19)                      This class meets once a week for three (3) hours. Students are required to attend every class

20)                      Attendance requirements will follow OLC’s attendance policy. The students may be dropped after 3 consecutive absences

21)                      Students who have accumulated 5 absences or a total of 15 hours will be dropped

22)                      If for some reason a student chooses to drop this class, it is the student’s responsibility to fill out a drop card or notify the instructor, center staff, or registrar, at which time a drop card may be filled out for the student by the contacted person. Failure to follow this procedure will result in a grade of “F” at the end of the semester.

23)                      It must be noted any student who misses even three of four classes will find it difficult to achieve success in this course.

24)                      If a student misses a class, it is the student’s responsibility to get the notes and assignments covered on the day of the absence.

 

REQUIREMENTS:

16)                      Attend all classes

17)                      Read all assigned chapters in text and any extra class handouts

18)                      Complete all assigned projects

19)                      Participate in classroom critiques

20)                      Take notes

 

EVALUATION: Each project must be completed on time. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of class. Your work will be assessed the day of the critique. If the work is unfinished, you must present it as it is and it will be graded at that point. Deadlines are a part of an artist life. All students are required to keep a sketchbook that should contain research notes and sources, project ideas, drawings, observations, printouts, etc. Your sketchbook should be with you at every class so we can discuss your problems from a visual base.

 

The letter grade I give will be based on:

• creativity - openness to experimentation with materials and thought processes

• concept - the context and content of your work developed from research

• craftsmanship - attention to details, consistency and structural integrity

• execution - coming to class prepared to work and at least 4 hours a week outside of class

• presentation - how the work is presented for the critique and what you have to say about it

 

Project(s)         50 points each               A = 90 – 100 points     

Midterm           25 points                     B = 80 – 89   points

Final               25 points                     C = 70 – 79   points

                                                                        D = 60 – 69   points

                                                            F =   0 – 59   points

 

LAKOTA PRESPECTIVE: The Lakota perspective will be provided by way of daily interactions between student and instructor where traditional Lakota values such as patience, respect, and honor will be maintained. The student will be expected to aid the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE:

This is an approximate schedule, and may change as the semester proceeds.

 

Week One: Review Syllabus, Introduction of Basic Printmaking Methods

 

Week Two: Discussion of Papers and inks, Explanation and examples of the MONOTYPE process

 

Week Three: Discussion of ORIGINAL PRINTS vs. Reproductions, Discussion of terminology relating to printmaking:Print, Prints, Edition, Signing and dating prints

 

Week Four: Discuss Relief Printing, Transferring image to linoleum plate

 

Week Five: CRITIQUE #1 Monotypes and Collagraph, Discuss Reduction Printing and 3-color Relief Printing the Relief plate.

 

Week Six: Reduction or 3 color Linoleum or woodcut.

 

Week Seven: Print Relief Edition Finish printing Relief Edition.

 

Week Eight: Critique #2 Relief, INTAGLIO PRINTING

 

Week Nine: Etching Applying hard ground and doing a line etching (acid bath safety).

 

Week Ten: Discuss Artist’s Book Aquatint procedure (rosin or spray paint). Printing the intaglio plate

 

Week Eleven: Discuss topics for final project

 

Week Twelve: CRITIQUE #3 Intaglio Sugar Lift, mezzotint and other processes

Prepare Image for final project

 

Week Thirteen: Work on final project

 

Week Fourteen: Print final project, Prepare work for final critique. All work should be signed and numbered.

 

Week Fifteen: Final Critique

 

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER: Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make changes in course content or instructional technique without notice or obligation.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at 455-6040.

 

 

 

Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   _    New          

    X     Revised (Course Title & Catalogue Course Description)

 

OLD Course Title:

ART 303 Art History I 

 

NEW Course Title:

ART 303 Art History I: Global Prehistory to European Pre-Renaissance

 

OLD Catalogue Course Description:

Art 303 Art History I: This course introduces the student to the history of art as it pertains to Western Civilization. It covers the following periods: Primitive, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Middle Ages, Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerism.   

3 credits

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

Art 303 Art History I: Global Prehistory to European Pre-Renaissance

This art course surveys the aesthetic historical expression throughout the following global cultures and artistic paradigms: Prehistoric, African, Mesopotamia, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Jewish, Islam, Hindu, Byzantine and Christianity, Pacific Islands, Native American, Mesoamerican/Pre-Colombian, European Medieval, European Renaissance, Japan, Korea, China, Buddhist. The class is designed to chronologically cover global Prehistory up to Pre-Renaissance eras.

3 credits.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

1. Course Title has been revised to specify chronology of content.

2. Course Catalogue Description has been revised to articulate progress away from limitation on content in artful expressions globally. Additionally, previous catalog course descriptions may be deemed solely Euro-centric, uninformed, and not reflective of global sensibilities in art past and present.

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites:  TBD

 

 

(If new course , attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1,  attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

OLC Humanities Department – ART PROGRAM – Kiri Close, Phd

ART 303: ART HISTORY, part I 

(Global Prehistory to European Pre-Renaissance)

(section 24 / SPRING 2011 / Mondays, 5pm – 8pm / He Sapa)

 

 

 

INSTRUCTOR: Kiri Close, Phd

OLC DEPARTMENT: Humanities/Social Science - http://www.olc.edu/local_links/humanities

EMAIL: kclose@olc.edu

FACEBOOK/TWITTER/BEBO/SKYPE                                                                                                                                  

KIRI’s BLOG: http://mail.olc.edu/~kclose

CELL/HOME: (308)360-0668  

OFFICE & PRIVATE CONFERENCE HOURS: TBD and scheduled with instructor                                                                                                                                                                   

(calls to or from students to me are allowed on weekdays from 10am – 9pm only, excluding the hours I am teaching or privately meeting with students & colleagues)

CLASS AFFILIATED PHONE CALLS: Calls for absences and tardiness are allowed up to 15 minutes before class begins. Phone calls after this will not be accepted. Please be considerate & leave a message with the OLC college center where we meet for class, or leave a brief message on my cell phone. DO NOT PERSISTENTLY CALL ME THEREAFTER IN HOPES I WILL ANSWER WHILE CLASS IS IN SESSION. DO NOT TEXT ME – I CAN’T AFFORD IT ANYMORE!

 

 

Required Text(s) and Other Materials to be furnished by the Student:

-Current adopted text: ART HISTORY, Volume 1, 4th Edition (Marilyn Stokstad, et al.). Feel free to purchase the textbook either on www.amazon.com (new editions at about US$93.00 or so, or from the OLC Bookstore).

 

 

-Online information retrieval journal articles and academic websites (TBD)

-Collegiate dictionary and thesaurus (electronic, cell phone versions, etc. welcome)

-Note-taking materials

-Portfolio materials (completed, submitted student assignments)

-Literary materials

-OLC library card

*Other materials may be required as the semester progresses.

 

ART 303 Course Prerequisites: LIT 203 and ENGL 113 with a minimum grade of “C”. If, for some reason, the OLC Registrar’s office permitted an ‘override’ for you that exempted you from enrolling and adequately passing LIT 203 and ENG 113 beforehand, I will research the situation until it is properly rectified.

ART 303 Course Objectives: As the students successfully progress through this world art history survey, they will establish their knowledge-base of the global (translated or in original writ) aesthetic world view up to the preRenaissance era.  It is expected that the art history concepts learned in the pre-requisite LIT 203 and ENGL 113 are common thought and usage amongst the students. Students can also enhance their electronic information retrieval skills in ART 303, as well as expect to dive into selections from literature, history, philosophy, politics, and other disciplines.

 

All art invited to investigate the numerous EMPLOYMENT and CAREER opportunities this class may enable (art historian, art professor, literature professor, museum curatorship, art retrieval, auction houses, art appraisal, artist/artisan, graphic design, etc.)

 

Additionally, the utilization of Lakota perspective is highly encouraged in this course. Lakota Iyapi always welcome. Lakota perspective always welcome.

 

LAKOTA PERSPECTIVE PROVIDED THROUGH, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Students are aware of their cultural identity.
  • Students will have a sense of Lakota and other indigenous people, and non-native history.
  • Students will have careers relevant to Liberal Arts which enhance and benefit life on and off the reservation.
  • Students will be prepared for graduate level work.
  • Students exhibit civic responsibility.

The Lakota perspective, especially the practice of Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi, is provided via the interaction between students and the instructor where the traditional Lakota values of patience, mutual respect, and honor are maintained. Students are expected to assist the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective within the scope of all of this course’s activities. It is heavily encouraged that student thought, expression, and discussions continually supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

 

 

 

 

 

CLASS & STUDENT CONDUCT (in relation to Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi):

  • Wolakolkiciyapi: Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage. If a student displays hostility, irrelevant & disruptive over-garrulousness, or other misconduct that is disturbing to his or her classmates and the instructor, the instructor will meet with that student privately to discuss the matter. Racial, and/or sexist slurs, jokes, teases, or other types of snide, hurtful, inappropriate , discriminatory,  bullying, or embarrassing remarks or actions performed in/out of class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff, & faculty are considered ‘student misconduct’. If misconduct persists, students may be approached by OLC administration. These comments can easily be considered threats which are grounds for expulsion from OLC and an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class. When students comment on the ‘uselessness’ of ART 303 courses, students should be prepared for me (instructor) to question them on the spot as why they would thoughtlessly produce such shallow, unfounded comments.
  • CLASS DISRUPTIONS: Abrupt, random outbursts of loud garrulousness will not be tolerated (e.g., when speaking to me (the instructor), other students, staff, on the cell phone, passersby, etc. ). Violent activities, loud music devices played at inappropriate times during class, noisy and late entrances into class once in session, hostile tones and comments/personalities, copying assigned work from another, incessant and disruptive movements, disruptive chatter amongst students who appear not to be attentive to lessons, etc., are not tolerated.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not tolerated within or without class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff & faculty either online, via email, by phone, vis-à-vis/in person, or by other modes of digital communication (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Bebo, Linked In, MySpace, iPod, iPod Touch, blogging, etc.). Since sexual harassment may be classified as a threat, a student can be immediately expelled from OLC. Additionally, a DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class will result. Sexual harassment is considered to be any of the following, but not limited to: unwanted touching of another’s body that causes the other’s discomfort; unwanted vocal, facial, or bodily expressions of an unwanted sexual nature from one student to another; any form of unwanted digital communication utilizing sexual denotational or connotational innuendo; sexual abuse of double entendres in any language; harmful teasing of one’s personal choice in sexual orientation (e.g., we will not use terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, ‘dyke’, ‘butch’, etc. in any harmful or uncomfortable way – therefore, the use of these terms is prohibited); inappropriate verbal or other use of body parts from one student to another; bullying of a student to date you or even ‘hang out’ with you;  ‘ogling’ of any form over another’s body and/or body parts inappropriately; sexual physical assault; date rape; use of pornographic images to approach another inappropriately; approaching another to pay for sexual favors; stalking; vocabulary that inappropriately privileges one gender or sex over the other; unwanted company; inappropriate approaching for a ‘date’; flirting to get your way; the meaning of ‘NO’; defamation; cyber bullying affiliated with sexual harassment; etc. Sexual harassment can be caused by, and happen to anyone regardless of race, gender, sex, status, age, etc.
  • THREATS,  USE OF NEPOTISM, STUDENT INSUBORDINATION: While freedom of creative, thoughtful expression is absolutely encouraged in this course, I will not tolerate any form of insubordination, thoughtless insult, or any form of threat by students (e.g., threat to use a family relation or associate on the school, college center board, or political prestige as a way to bully or ‘corner’ the instructor or other students from progressing or exercising their rights enforced by OLC policy; physical or verbal threats imposed on others; gang related; family related; romantically linked, etc.). If a student feels that another in the class has displayed such hostility, the ‘accused’ will be privately approached by instructor for a resolution. If threats/insubordination persist, OLC administration will be prompted for possible and immediate expulsion from OLC as well as an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class (in concurrence with OLC policies for student grievance, disciplinary actions, etc.). A student’s personal expression of who they are NEVER LICENSES their right to impose upon another student, faculty, staff, administration, class guest, etc. According to OLC policy, all students are encouraged to practice their right to file a grievance against another student freely.
  • STUDENTS UNDER THE INFLUENCE: On suspicion, the instructor reserves the right to approach intoxicated students under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances. Most likely, these students will be immediately sent home and reported to that OLC college center’s administrative personnel. Students are expected to perform academic assignments while sober, and alert. The teacher will approach a student about their online assignment submissions on suspicion of alcohol influence, use of illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances.
  • TOBACCO ON CAMPUS: The use of commercial chewing and/or smoking tobacco for leisure is absolutely prohibited at all OLC college centers and grounds as well as inside the classrooms (whether class is in session or otherwise).
  • DISABILITY: If you feel you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at (605)455-6040. I am happily always ready to offer any assistance as your teacher to ensure your well being :o)  
  • See OLC 2010-11 Catalog,  and the OLC 2010-11 Academic Planner for more details.
  • CHILDREN: As OLC college center policy states, children of students are not permitted in class while it is in session. Please make arrangements for their care outside class. While children are a blessing, there is no facility available that allows children to be present in classes with their parent(s). I am absolutely strict with this rule. Students who must leave or be absent from class due to child issues will be marked absent for that day/evening. Situation approached on a case by case basis.

*As situations not listed above arise, other codes of conduct, conduct resolutions, etc. will be utilized. Teacher reserves the right to combine the above words and OLC 201-2011 Catalog AND OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner policies, OLC Policy and Procedure Manual links on the college website (http://www.olc.edu/about/governance/), as well as OLC Administrative personnel regarding class & student conduct along with other aspects listed in this syllabus as deemed necessary (e.g., Academic Integrity & Plagiarism, Policies on Plagiarism or Cheating, etc. ).

 

Course Outcomes:

  1. Students will establish an understanding of global art history and its reflection of the human experience while reinforcing their analytical and critical thinking skills by developing individual theoretical interpretations of the various literary selections studied.
  2. Students will enhance their existing electronic information retrieval skills by accessing examples of critical theory written by other art, literature, history, philosophy, and other cultural scholars.
  3. By studying art history selections of various genres, students will enhance their understanding of how Lakota culture relates to other systems around the world.
  4. By forming individual critical theories based on the art history selections studied throughout the survey and sharing it with their classmates, students will reinforce their oral and written communication skills.
  5. As a result of the course’s reading selections, students will enhance their current reading and art history appreciation skills.

 

Students will be required to:

  1. Discuss (orally and in writing) various literary genres as represented by the literary selections within the course’s anthology,
  2. Participate in class activities by reading the various literary assignments from the Stokstad anthology,
  3. Complete and submit a personal literary journal in the form of consecutive homework assignments (TBDetailed),
  4. Familiarize themselves with the various art history components associated with the global historic genres,
  5. Maintain and submit a course portfolio (which is composed of submitted assignments to be kept in a folder by the instructor),
  6. Collaborate with other Art History students, along with other English-Communications, and Art majors.
  7. Complete the OLC instructor evaluation for ART 303: Art History, part I.

 

Learning Objectives: The Humanities and Social Sciences department has adopted the following objectives:

  1. The ability to identify, define, solve, & reflect on situations found in literature. (Critical Thinking)
  2. The ability to locate and evaluate information utilizing some current technology. (Research and Writing)
  3. The ability to communicate with accuracy and clarity. (Speaking, Writing, Thinking of Art History)
  4. The ability to read, comprehend, retain, apply and utilize sources of information responsibly. (Reading and Writing)
  5. Develop an understanding of Lakota culture and philosophy within the broader context of a diverse global society.

Oglala Lakota College has adopted the improvement of student learning as an integral purpose related to students’ learning objectives. Additionally, the OLC Humanities and Social Sciences Department encourages this fundamental belief within its ART 303: ART HISTORY, part I course. As a result of the reflective process each student undergoes, students will have the opportunity to develop an enhanced understanding of the integral aspect of global art history’s “human & artful experience” from a multiplicity of perspectives internationally.

 

Learning Outcomes: By the successful completion of ART 303:Art History, part I, students will have demonstrated their ability to enhance their literacy skills (reading and writing) and art history by presenting evidence of critical thinking; communicating clearly and accurately (orally and in writing); comparing Lakota culture and philosophy with other systems within our diverse global society; and an improvement in their overall learning strategies with a level of expertise reflecting the second-year student (sophomore)  or higher level experience.

           

Student Responsibilities and Special Course Requirements: Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including Art History. Each student will retain a personal copy of all of her/his activity and assignment materials for her/his course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity and assignment as this course progresses.

 

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current OLC college catalog states:

“Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty”. (10)

 

POLICIES ON PLAGIARISM OR CHEATING:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation (a form of acknowledgement).

 

Although a person may give her/his permission to you to utilize her/his words or ideas, it is plagiarism unless you credit her/him for the specific idea or words. You are responsible for understanding plagiarism. Contact me with any questions you may have. Most cases of plagiarism are the result of improper citation or utilization of punctuation (quotation marks) and can be easily avoided. We will utilize the current MLA style manual for this course (I have a copy of MLA style). If you are unfamiliar with it or have forgotten how to utilize the MLA formats, contact me immediately and I can provide you with several sources. However, along with LIT 203, ENG 113 is a prerequisite for this course already.

 

*On suspicion of cheating and/or plagiarism, the teacher reserves the right to search online for phrases and words verbatim from the student’s assignment submission, and to also require the student to rewrite the same assignment (or another work) while the teacher is physically present. The teacher also has the right to suspect then privately approach any student if cheating and/or plagiarism is sensed.

 

Course Geography: Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments. This will require your weekly participation throughout the semester. Class discussions should include substantive input from each student each week.

 

Course Assignments: There will be a variety of reading and written activities and assignments explicating art history as the course progresses. Among these are interpretive and reflective essays, and course portfolios. Quizzes and additional activities (discussions, presentations, etc.) should be anticipated. I will provide and retain all student work in portfolio folders that I will distribute. ALL ASSIGNMENTS DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF EVERY CLASS or VIA EMAIL PRIOR TO CLASS ATTENDANCE.

 

QUIZZES: Quizzes are held at the very beginning of class immediately following attendance/roll call. Quizzes cannot be made up once completed. Points accumulated during quizzes will be used toward your final grade. Some of the main purposes of quizzing students is to more further: combat tardiness, enforce the reading assignments from the previous week, & to aid students in point accumulation.

 

ELECTRONIC/ORAL MIDTERM & FINAL EXAMS: DATES/TIMES TBD.

 

RESEARCH: While there is no formal research/term paper assigned for this course, students have the option in discussing with me the possibilities of composing one. There may also be an option to present your literary research at an academic conference.

 

Grading Criteria and Total Components of a Grade: Course grades will be based on participation and completion of assignments listed below in syllabus timeline.  For a passing grade, students must obtain 70% or higher. (see below for further information on evaluation standards of written assignments).

Departmental Grading Scale:

A = 90-100 %

B = 80-89   %

C = 70-79   %

D = 60=69   %

F = Below 60 %

 

PARTICIPATION STANDARD/COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS:

OLC’s institutional attendance policy is outlined on page 13 of the current catalog which states:

Students are required to attend class regularly. If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor first. At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. An excused absence is counted in a student’s total number of absences. A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences at the discretion of the instructor and district director and will be dropped after five total absences. The instructor must submit a drop card by the 15th week or a letter grade.

Additionally, in this course, 2 tardies (consecutive or not) equate one absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class WEEKLY throughout the semester by demonstrating and exhibiting a tertiary level (at the very least) of weekly class involvement having read & screened all assigned materials.

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises. 
  • Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.
  • Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:
    • Three (3) ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) in a row constitutes an automatic drop.
    • Five (5) scattered ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).
    • Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded (see below). Further, 2 tardies = 1 absence in my class.
    • All ABSENCES – EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED – will be used to drop each student who has exceeded absences by OLC Registrar. Once a student is dropped, they CANNOT be reinstated (OLC Registrar policy).
    • If your absences affect your performance in class, absences (and tallied tardies) may result in a grade that is dependent upon your attendance/non-attendance.
  • If you must miss a class in case of an emergency, you should call or email the instructor, and pick up assignments from my box at the college center, or utilize other methods of correspondence in regards to make-up work. Do not call to speak to me once class for the day/evening has begun (9am/1pm/5pm). If you are to be late, or absent for class, please leave a polite message with the college center staff, & leave the message(s) by at least 15 minutes before class begins. Please be considerate.
  • Early leave from class (unannounced & not authorized by the instructor) is considered an absence for the day. Also, if you announce or inform me that you will leave prior to the completion of class (12noon/4pm), it may also be considered an absence. Please inform me via email or by phone ahead of time (15 minutes before class begins) to discuss. NOTE: Simply ‘asking’ the teacher to be excused during class before the day’s course hours are complete does not automatically license a student toward an ‘excused absence’. Please be considerate and serious about your work and class attendance.
  • You should also be aware that drops from my class will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.
  • At an announced point in time during the semester, the OLC Registrar’s office will drop you from courses if class absences are exceeded. Instructors no longer have the initial control on the OLC Jenzabar site in this regard – EXCUSED ABSENCES also result in OLC Registrar’s Office officially dropping you from class.

 

Feedback Schedule: I hope to provide you feedback the day(s)/week(s) following the submission of an assignment. I will be checking my OLC email (kclose@olc.edu) frequently throughout the week. I will also utilize your OLC email address to communicate with you, & am open to use your other email addresses to correspond with you if needed.

 

Course Procedures and Policies on Late Assignments:

 Late Papers will receive one of the two following grades:

7.             The grade the work actually deserves.

8.             The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Methods for Delivering Assignments: Each assignment should be submitted by the student (herself/himself). Remember to utilize all of your edit/revision tools learned in ENG 103/113 & LIT 203. Assignment documents can be formatted with the current or older edition of MS Word software. There may be circumstances which may require a student to submit an assignment in an alternative manner. However, the alternative delivery should be discussed with me before the assignment’s due date. You need to retain a copy of all of your activities and assignments. I should never have the only copy of anything (consider a USB flash drive for your archives).

NOTE ON PEER REVIEW: While it would behoove you to allow another person to review & critique your written assignments, I am highly concerned about whom you allow to do so. Please choose a reviewer who is well informed, truly experienced, & positive of the writing level expectations of ART 303: Art History, part I. I strongly suggest you choose an experienced academic tutor to look over your work. Please do not allow them to solely edit/revise, as that task is upon you.

Course Evaluation: I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation distributed at the end of the course. Ideally, this activity will be completed during week thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: At the very least, this literature course will utilize the writing standards used in the ENG 103: Freshman Writing I as far as editing & format are considered. However, the reflective level of ideas should be at the ENG 113: Freshman Writing II level (see attached writing rubric scoring sheets).

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Only students that complete this course with a letter grade of ‘B’ or higher will be allowed LORs, or letters of recommendation.

 

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus is, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered an inflexible ‘contract’ between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English I Rubric (basic writing evaluation for LIT 203: Intro. To Literature)

The thesis sentence indicates a topic and expresses direction.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The introduction grabs the reader’s attention and introduces the topic.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The body involves information that is developed and supported in topic sentences.  Paragraphs support the thesis.  The evidence is necessary and relevant and contains a balance of both generalities and specifics (details, anecdotes, statistics, etc.)  Claims are supported rationally or empirically.  Transitions are used to signal organization within a paragraph and/or between paragraphs.  The essay is well organized and reads smoothly from beginning to end.  The information is focused and apparent digressions connect with the thesis.  The approach to the topic is interesting,

demonstrates an air of inquiry, challenges what someone says or writes, and makes an evaluation.  When readings and presentations are used, they are evaluated analyzed, and interpreted and not merely summarized.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The conclusion creates a feeling of closure.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Style:  word choices are appropriate and effective for purpose and audience.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Language Use and Correctness in sentences is clear, coherent and varied.  Writing adheres to the conventions of edited English in mechanics, grammar, and spelling.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Essay Scoring Rubric

1

1.  The writer has often launched right into an explanation without a sentence which gives the main idea or central point of the essay.

2.  The evidence or examples used consist of general statements with no specifics, or of several short examples with no general statement to tie them to the topic.

3.  There is often no attempt to create paragraphs in the body of the writing. Often there is one paragraph in the entire essay.

4.  Errors in sentence structure, punctuation, and usage seriously distract the reader at times, and often interfere with meaning.

5.  As the writer moves from point to point, no transition words are used to move the reader along.

6.  The organization of the information in the body of the paper is not clear. Information may be presented as a stream of consciousness without regard for the needs of the reader.

 

2

1.  There is usually a statement of what the topic of the paper is. Often, however, the writer does not state a clear point of view. Sometimes, however, there is a main idea or thesis sentence.

2.  The evidence or examples used consist of either generalities or specifics, such as long stories, but there is not a mixture of both.

3.  There is an attempt to use paragraphs throughout the essay. Usually the central point of each paragraph is clear.

4.  Errors in sentence structure, punctuation or usage periodically distract the reader.

5.  There are a few transition words to link ideas together, or they may be used inappropriately.

6.  The overall organization of the paper is unclear although sections of the paper may be focused. Sometimes the paper is primarily a story.

3

1.  The main idea of the essay is clear, and is stated in the introduction, but sometimes is not stated clearly until the end of the paper.

2.  The evidence used contains both generalities and specifics, but may not be well balanced between them both.

3.  Paragraphing is skillful. In most cases a clear central idea is apparent in each paragraph.

4.  The writer has few sentence level errors. They may be described as mildly distracting.

5.  The writer uses some transitions, but may sometimes use them inappropriately.

6.  While the whole paper “hangs together”, the organization in some places is choppy.

 

4

1.  The main idea/ thesis statement is clearly stated in the introduction.

2.  The evidence contains a balance of both generalities and specifics:  explanations, anecdotes, statistics, etc.

3.  Paragraphing is appropriate, and clear central points are made in each paragraph.

4.  The paper has been carefully edited, but a few errors may still exist.

5.  The writer uses transitions appropriately.

6.  The essay is well organized and reads smoothly from beginning to end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Regular Class Time (weather sensitive):

5pm – 6:15pm LECTURE, discussion

6:16pm – 6:31pm Class Break

6:32pm – 7:45pm Lecture, discussion

7:45pm – 8pm Homework Preview, Discussion, Miscellaneous, Extra, etc.

 

POSSIBLE FIELD TRIPS: TBD

 

-Visit to THE DAHL Museum in Rapid City, SD – date, times, fees TBD

 

-OTHER: TBD

 

NO TRADITIONAL JOURNAL FOR THIS COURSE – Details TBD

Week

Class Work

Homework

Due

 

1

 

 

 

-Introductions

-Correct, working emails list

- Syllabus, textbook review

(What is ART?, etc.)

-Adorno & AESTHETIC THEORY

-First Day with Films and Images

-Textbook review

-Timeline review

-What to look for in art
(?)

 

 

-Cornell Note Taking Method

-Journals

-Writing Expectations (e.g., response vs. summary)

-DECLARING A MAJOR

(fin aid – D.O.E.)

-Theatre Group

-ENGLAND INT’L STUDY ABROAD

-AA of ART MAJORS INTERNATIONAL STUDENT TRAVEL EXHIBIT to England, Africa (possibly Italy)

---

-Homework Preview

 

-Purchase Textbook (3pts)

-Read: CHAPTER 1, TBD

- WRITING SAMPLE:  (RESPONSE to WHAT IS PRIMITIVE? Or WHAT IS ART?, not a summary) essay: basic MLA format,

1 paragraph, 10 sentences, 10 words, typed, titled, DS, Times New Roman font, size 10-12, no boldfaced nor italicization nor underlining of all or most of main body,  correct citation where needed). See MLA essay samples in syllabus.

 

-Bring a rubber band for your hair, old dishwashing gloves, an old T-shirt and other old clothes that you don’t mind getting dirty

 

 

 

 

        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         N/A

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

-Ancient Wall Painting Techniques

 

-Groups:

Ancient building and drawing techniques – post &lintel, wood framing, wattle & daub (small models), Stonehenge, cave drawings in dark

 

-Begin overview of chapter 2

 

-Homework Preview

(review Cornell Note taking)

 

-Read Chapter 2: Art of the Ancient Near East (pp. 26 – 47)

 

Journal I

-3 full pages of Cornell Note Taking Method (handwritten, both sides, 8 ½” x 11” lined notebook paper).

Focus on:

·          Cuneiform writing in Sumeria

·          Enemies crossing the Euphrates to escape Assyrian archers

·          Ishtar Gate

·          Standard of Ur, front & back

·        Stele of Naram-Sin

·        Code of Hammurabi

·        Looting of Baghdad Museum

·          Epic of Gilgamesh

·          Pantheon of gods & mythology

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

 

-Quiz A

 

-old clothes and items to wear listed from first day of class

 

-Textbook due

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Quiz B

-Short discussion of Chapter 2

-Visuals

-Epic of Gilgamesh heroic poetry & plot

in-class reading

 

Begin overview of Chapter 3 (hand out distributed)

 

-Homework Preview (review annotation)

-Read Chapter 3:

Art of Ancient Egypt

(pp. 48 – 79)

Focus on:

·          Akhenaton and his family

·          Palette of Narmer

·          Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

·          King Tut

·          Mummification

·          Canopic Jars

·          Kingdom eras

·          Hieroglyphics

·          Pantheon of Gods & Mythology

·          Ramses II

·          Pyramids & Mastabas

 

Journal 2

-Annotate entire chapter.

 

 

 

-Quiz B

 

-Journal I

4

 

 

 

 

-Quiz C

 

-Short discussion of Chapter 3: Art of Ancient Egypt (with discussion of The Book of the Dead)

 

-Brief discussion of Chapter 4: Art of the Ancient Aegean

 

-Begin overview of Chapter 5: Art of Ancient Greece

 

-Homework Preview (review Compare & Contrast Essay framework)

-Read Chapter 5: Art of Ancient Greece

(pp. 100 – 157)

Focus on:

·        Evolution & variety of Greek vase design

·        Red & Black figured vase design

·        Architecture

·        Empire conquests

·        Sculpture evolution

·        Idealism vs. Realism

·        Greek sense of beauty

·        Theatre

·        Clothing

·        Pantheon of Gods & Mythology

 

Journal 3:

COMPARE & CONTRAST Essay – a) distinguish Greek columns; OR b) art of Pre-Greek Aegean World to Greek Empire; OR c) evolution of Greek sculpture; OR idealism vs. realism in Greek sense of beauty:

basic MLA format,

3 paragraphs, 10 sentences, 10 words, typed, titled, DS, Times New Roman font, size 10-12, no boldfaced nor italicization nor underlining of all or most of main body,  correct citation where needed). See MLA essay samples in syllabus

 

-Quiz C

 

-Journal 2

Chapter annotation check in-class

 

5

 

 

 

 

-Quiz D

 

Discussion of Chapter 5: Art of Ancient Greece

 

-Visuals & handout distributed

 

-Begin overview of Chapter 6: Etruscan & Roman Art

 

-Homework Preview (review of Process Essay framework)

 

 

 

Read Chapter 6: Etruscan & Roman Art

(pp. 158 – 215)

Focus on:

·        Similarities/Differences between Greek & Roman art (sculpture especially) architecture, society personalities, and pantheon of gods & mythology

·        Purported origins of Roman Empire

·        Column of Trajan

·        Roman Colosseum

·        Peristyle Garden home layout

·        Aqueducts

·        Frescoes

·        Mosaics

·        Jewish conquests, Christian movement, Fall of Rome

 

Journal 4

Compose a PROCESS Essay of how you think the Romans implemented Greek society & expression, but did so on their own terms. Basic MLA format,

3 paragraphs, 10 sentences, 10 words, typed, titled, DS, Times New Roman font, size 10-12, no boldfaced nor italicization nor underlining of all or most of main body,  correct citation where needed). See MLA essay samples in syllabus.

 

 

-Quiz D

 

-Journal 3

 

6

 

 

 

 

-Quiz E

 

-Discussion of Chapter 6: Etruscan & Roman Art (with visuals and handout distributed)

 

FLASH FORWARD – Lecture Insert: The effects of Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, on the world today. Visuals & if nice day, we will take a walk within the area to see traces of the classical Mediterranean/

Near & Middle East World around us.

 

-Begin overview of Chapter 7: Jewish, Early Christian, & Byzantine Art

 

-Homework Preview (review multi-media options)

 

 

Read Chapter 7: Jewish, Christian, & Byzantine Art

(pp. 216 - 259)

Focus on:

·        Mythology & Deities

·        Longevity of Judaism

·        Growth of Christianity

·        Rise of Byzantine Empire

·        Iconic Art

·        Architecture

·        Religious Objects

·        Paintings

 

Journal 5:

Using the video device on your cell phone or digital camera, PICK 2 renditions of art from either Jewish, Christian, or Byzantine era to discuss.

DO NOT EXCEED more than 7 MINUTES, and DO NOT PROVIDE LESS THEN 5 MINUTES of visual (with audio). Include recorded visual samples of each piece. You may use visuals from the internet and our Stokstad textbook. ALL PIECES MUST BE FOUND IN CHAPTER 7 OF THE STOKSTAD TEXTBOOK. We will spend the next day in class viewing these.

Include:

1.        Check off list of which art piece you will choose to avoid students choosing same art pieces (Kiri will have checklist for you before you leave for class)

2.        Name of piece

3.        Which Religion it is affiliated with

4.        Year and location of its origin

5.        Background information about it and artist
(if artist is known)

6.        Technique used

7.        Why you chose it

*Feel free to borrow a friend’s or family member’s electronic audio/visual recording device.

-Quiz E

 

-Journal 4

7

 

 

 

 

-Quiz F

 

-Brief Discussion of Chapter 7: Jewish, Christian, & Byzantine Art

 

-Student films (with audio)

 

-Begin Overview of Chapter 8: Islamic Art

 

-Homework Preview

Read Chapter 8: Islamic Art

(pp. 260 - 289)

Focus on:

·        Mohammed and visions

·        Koran/Q’uran

·        Persian Miniatures

·        Moorish Architecture

·        Ornament & Inscription of Calligraphy

·        Kaaba & Mecca

·        Mosque Architecture

·        Haram Al-Sharif

·        Hagia Sophia & its religious history

·        Suleiman the Great

·        Mamluks, Minbars, and Mihrabs

·        Fritware

·        Textiles

 

 

No Written Homework

-Quiz F

 

-Journal 5

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Quiz G

 

-POSSIBLE GUEST SPEAKER

 

-Power Point & Film Visuals (with handout) & Lecture

 

-Readings of the Koran/Q’uran

 

-Readings from One Thousand and One Arabian Nights (affiliated

film clips)

 

-Homework Preview of eMidterm Exam

 

Bring $6.00 to next class!

 

 

-eMidterm Exam via email to kclose@olc.edu  -  OPEN BOOK/OPEN NOTES (details TBD)

 

-$6.00 for the next class!

We will eat East Indian food while discussing and discovering the beautiful contents of Chapter 9: Art of South and Southeast Asia Before 1200.

-Quiz G

9

 

 

 

-eMidterm due via email

 

-$6.00

 

-East Indian Foods

 

-Thorough discussion & discovery of Chapter 9: Art of South and Southeast Asia Before 1200.

 

-Power Point Visuals & Film excerpts (focus on art, pantheon of Gods, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc.)

 

-Homework Preview (Description Essay framework)

 

Read Chapter 10: Chinese & Korean Art Before 1279

(pp. 324 – 353)

Focus on:

·          Popularity & Spread of Buddhism

·          Terracotta ‘Soldiers’

·          Weaponry

·          Animal motifs in art objects and paintings

·          Painted Banners and Scrolls

·          Pagoda Architecture

·          Silk Road inspired earthenware

·          Northern vs. Southern painting schools in China

·          Stoneware, Celadon, Bone China ware

·          Royal Dynasties

·          Nature, Philosophy, & Meaning in Art

 

             Journal 6

DESCRIPTION ESSAY: Compose a descriptive essay on the paintings on scroll of ancient China from Chapter 10. Include several adjectives that discuss the role of nature, philosophy, and meaning in these art forms. Basic MLA format,

3 paragraphs, 10 sentences, 10 words, typed, titled, DS, Times New Roman font, size 10-12, no boldfaced nor italicization nor underlining of all or most of main body,  correct citation where needed). See MLA essay samples in syllabus.

 

-Bring a rubber band to tie your hair back. Wear clothing that you don’t mind getting soiled. Bring 4 paper cups. Bring paintbrushes if you have.

 

-eMidterm due via email

 

-$6.00

10

 

 

-Quiz H

 

-Discussion of Chapter 10: Chinese & Korean Art Before 1200

 

-Possible artist guest speaker (you will have hands on experience with Chinese painting in this class session)

 

-Homework Preview (Cornell Notetaking Method)

 

Read Chapter 11: Japanese Art Before 1333

(pp. 354 - 375)

 

Focus on:

·        Buddhism in Japan at this time

·        Different affiliated periods of the Empire

·        Written alphabet

·        Ornamentation on Architecture

·        Paintings

 

                     Journal 7

-2 full pages of Cornell Note Taking Method (handwritten, both sides,

8 ½” x 11” lined notebook paper).

-Quiz H

 

-Journal 6

-items announced in previous class

11

 

 

 

 

 

-Quiz I

 

-Discussion of Chapter 11: Japanese Art Before 1333

 

-Power Point & Film (handout distributed)

 

-Begin Overview of Chapter 12

 

-Review Field Trip Details

 

-Homework Preview (Worksheet)

Read Chapter 12 Art of the Americas Before 1300

(pp. 376 - 401)

 

Choose 10 aspects to focus on. Use Worksheet.

 

Journal 8

Worksheet to be distributed via email. Details TBD in class.

Keep a copy for yourself, as we assert student discussion of their selections in the next class.

-Quiz I

 

-Journal 7

12

 

 

 

-Quiz J

 

-Student Discussion of Chosen works on Worksheet

 

-

 

-Review Field Trip details for upcoming Friday & On –site worksheet

 

-

 

-FIELD TRIP- FLASH FORWARD:

Art Today

FRIDAY, @ Dahl Art Center,

5pm – 7pm

FREE ADMISSION

On-site worksheet

 

 

 

Worksheet

-Quiz J

 

-Journal 8 (worksheet via email at kclose@olc.edu before class begins).

13

 

 

-Review Worksheets

 

-Class Lecture on Chapter 13: Early African Art

 

JEOPARDY GAME!

Group Teams

(details TBD)

 

-Homework Preview

 

Group A:

 Read Chapter 14:

Early Medieval Art in Europe

Follow instructions on Work Sheet – You will present chapter highlights in next class. Presentation time details TBD. Every group member must present.

 

 

 

Group B:

Read Chapter 15:

Romanesque Art

Follow instructions on Work Sheet – You will present chapter highlights in next class. Presentation time details TBD.

Every group member must present.

 

-The Dahl Arts Center Worksheet

 

 

14

 

 

-Group Worksheet & Presentations

 

-Further Lecture with film(s) & other visuals

 

-Begin Overview of Chapter 16

 

-Discussion of Final Oral Exam (details TBD – student choice checklist for chosen subject matter distributed during class before dismissal)

 

-Homework Preview

Read Chapter 16:

Gothic Art of the Twelfth & Thirteenth Centuries

(pp. 490 - 527)

 

Focus on:

·        Famous Cathedrals & Chapels

·        Stained Glass

·        Contrasting styles throughout Europe (e.g., German vs. English vs. French, etc.)

·        Christian Iconography

·        Paintings

 

       Journal 9

RESPONSE ESSAY to any one particular cathedral of note mentioned and described in your Stokstad textbook. Basic MLA format,

3 paragraphs, 10 sentences, 10 words, typed, titled, DS, Times New Roman font, size 10-12, no boldfaced nor italicization nor underlining of all or most of main body,  correct citation where needed). See MLA essay samples in syllabus.

 

-Group Worksheet & Pres.

15

 

 

-Quiz K

 

-Short Lecture of Chapter 16 highlights

 

 

 

 

 

-Oral Final with final assignment checklist

(details TBD)

PRIVATE STUDENT/TEACHER CONFERENCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Oral Final with final assignment checklist

(details TBD)

PRIVATE STUDENT/TEACHER CONFERENCE

-Quiz K

 

-Journal 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Oral Final

(details TBD)

 

 


Curriculum Change Form

 

Proposal for Course change

 

   _    New          

    X     Revised (Course Title & Catalogue Course Description)

 

OLD Course Title:

ART 313 Art History II

 

NEW Course Title:

ART 313 Art History II: European Renaissance to Contemporary Internationalism

 

OLD Catalogue Course Description:

ART 313 Art History II This course is a continuing introduction to the History of Art I as it pertains to Western Civilization. This survey covers the following: Baroque Art, 18th and 19th Century Art, Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, The Cubist Epoch, 20th Century Abstract Art movements, etc.   

3 credits

 

NEW Catalogue Course Description

ART 313 Art History II: European Renaissance to Contemporary Internationalism

This art course surveys the aesthetic historical expression throughout the following global cultures and artistic paradigms: European Renaissance, African, Islam, Hindu, Christianity, Pacific Islands, Native American, Post-Colombian, Japan, Korea, China, Buddhist, Global Abstract, Native American Modernism, Indigenous Self-Determination era, etc. The class is designed to chronologically cover global art sensibilities beginning with the European Renaissance up to the present Contemporary Internationalism.

3 credits.

 

Statement of Need and Purposes:

1. Course Title has been revised to specify chronology of content.

2. Course Catalogue Description has been revised to articulate progress away from limitation on content in artful expressions globally. Additionally, previous catalog course descriptions may be deemed solely Euro-centric, uninformed, and not reflective of global sensibilities in art past and present.

 

College Requirements Affected:

None

 

Anticipated Staffing, Costs, and Revenues:

Current faculty have developed the course and can teach it.

 

 

Course Prerequisites:  TBD

 

 

(If new course , attach sample syllabus including catalogue description).

 

In addition to PWO form 1,  attached, departmental and divisional responses are required.

 

 

 

_________________________________      ___________________________________

Department Chair                      Date               Instructional Vice President          Date

Comments (Use back if necessary)

 

 

 

 

 

OLC Humanities Department – ART PROGRAM – Kiri Close, Phd

ART 313: ART HISTORY, part II 

(European Renaissance to Contemporary Internationalism)

(section -- / -- 2011 / -- / --)

 

 

INSTRUCTOR: Kiri Close, Phd

OLC DEPARTMENT: Humanities/Social Science - http://www.olc.edu/local_links/humanities

EMAIL: kclose@olc.edu

FACEBOOK/TWITTER/BEBO/SKYPE                                                                                                                                 

KIRI’s BLOG: http://mail.olc.edu/~kclose

CELL/HOME: (308)360-0668  

OFFICE & PRIVATE CONFERENCE HOURS: TBD and scheduled with instructor                                                                                                                                                                  

(calls to or from students to me are allowed on weekdays from 10am – 9pm only, excluding the hours I am teaching or privately meeting with students & colleagues)

CLASS AFFILIATED PHONE CALLS: Calls for absences and tardiness are allowed up to 15 minutes before class begins. Phone calls after this will not be accepted. Please be considerate & leave a message with the OLC college center where we meet for class, or leave a brief message on my cell phone. DO NOT PERSISTENTLY CALL ME THEREAFTER IN HOPES I WILL ANSWER WHILE CLASS IS IN SESSION. DO NOT TEXT ME – I CAN’T AFFORD IT ANYMORE!

 

 

Required Text(s) and Other Materials to be furnished by the Student:

-Current adopted text: ART HISTORY, Volume 2, 4th Edition (Marilyn Stokstad, et al.). Feel free to purchase the textbook either on www.amazon.com (new editions at about US$93.00 or so, or from the OLC Bookstore).

 

 

-Online information retrieval journal articles and academic websites (TBD)

-Collegiate dictionary and thesaurus (electronic, cell phone versions, etc. welcome)

-Note-taking materials

-Portfolio materials (completed, submitted student assignments)

-Literary materials

-OLC library card

*Other materials may be required as the semester progresses.

 

ART 313 Course Prerequisites: LIT 203 and ENGL 113 with a minimum grade of “C”. If, for some reason, the OLC Registrar’s office permitted an ‘override’ for you that exempted you from enrolling and adequately passing LIT 203 and ENG 113 beforehand, I will research the situation until it is properly rectified.

ART 313 Course Objectives: As the students successfully progress through this world art history survey, they will establish their knowledge-base of the global (translated or in original writ) aesthetic world view beginning with the European Renaissance era.  It is expected that the art history concepts learned in the pre-requisite LIT 203 and ENGL 113 are common thought and usage amongst the students. Students can also enhance their electronic information retrieval skills in ART 313, as well as expect to dive into selections from literature, history, philosophy, politics, and other disciplines.

 

All art invited to investigate the numerous EMPLOYMENT and CAREER opportunities this class may enable (art historian, art professor, literature professor, museum curatorship, art retrieval, auction houses, art appraisal, artist/artisan, graphic design, etc.)

 

Additionally, the utilization of Lakota perspective is highly encouraged in this course. Lakota Iyapi always welcome. Lakota perspective always welcome.

 

LAKOTA PERSPECTIVE PROVIDED THROUGH, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Students are aware of their cultural identity.
  • Students will have a sense of Lakota and other indigenous people, and non-native history.
  • Students will have careers relevant to Liberal Arts which enhance and benefit life on and off the reservation.
  • Students will be prepared for graduate level work.
  • Students exhibit civic responsibility.

The Lakota perspective, especially the practice of Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi, is provided via the interaction between students and the instructor where the traditional Lakota values of patience, mutual respect, and honor are maintained. Students are expected to assist the instructor with the inclusion of the Lakota perspective within the scope of all of this course’s activities. It is heavily encouraged that student thought, expression, and discussions continually supply a Lakota perspective on any topic considered in class.

 

CLASS & STUDENT CONDUCT (in relation to Wolakota and Wolakolkiciyapi):

  • Wolakolkiciyapi: Students are encouraged to display the Lakota values of respect, knowledge, generosity, fortitude, truthfulness, and courage. If a student displays hostility, irrelevant & disruptive over-garrulousness, or other misconduct that is disturbing to his or her classmates and the instructor, the instructor will meet with that student privately to discuss the matter. Racial, and/or sexist slurs, jokes, teases, or other types of snide, hurtful, inappropriate , discriminatory,  bullying, or embarrassing remarks or actions performed in/out of class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff, & faculty are considered ‘student misconduct’. If misconduct persists, students may be approached by OLC administration. These comments can easily be considered threats which are grounds for expulsion from OLC and an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class. When students comment on the ‘uselessness’ of ART 303 courses, students should be prepared for me (instructor) to question them on the spot as why they would thoughtlessly produce such shallow, unfounded comments.
  • CLASS DISRUPTIONS: Abrupt, random outbursts of loud garrulousness will not be tolerated (e.g., when speaking to me (the instructor), other students, staff, on the cell phone, passersby, etc. ). Violent activities, loud music devices played at inappropriate times during class, noisy and late entrances into class once in session, hostile tones and comments/personalities, copying assigned work from another, incessant and disruptive movements, disruptive chatter amongst students who appear not to be attentive to lessons, etc., are not tolerated.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not tolerated within or without class times toward fellow students, guests, visitors, OLC staff & faculty either online, via email, by phone, vis-à-vis/in person, or by other modes of digital communication (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Bebo, Linked In, MySpace, iPod, iPod Touch, blogging, etc.). Since sexual harassment may be classified as a threat, a student can be immediately expelled from OLC. Additionally, a DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class will result. Sexual harassment is considered to be any of the following, but not limited to: unwanted touching of another’s body that causes the other’s discomfort; unwanted vocal, facial, or bodily expressions of an unwanted sexual nature from one student to another; any form of unwanted digital communication utilizing sexual denotational or connotational innuendo; sexual abuse of double entendres in any language; harmful teasing of one’s personal choice in sexual orientation (e.g., we will not use terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, ‘dyke’, ‘butch’, etc. in any harmful or uncomfortable way – therefore, the use of these terms is prohibited); inappropriate verbal or other use of body parts from one student to another; bullying of a student to date you or even ‘hang out’ with you;  ‘ogling’ of any form over another’s body and/or body parts inappropriately; sexual physical assault; date rape; use of pornographic images to approach another inappropriately; approaching another to pay for sexual favors; stalking; vocabulary that inappropriately privileges one gender or sex over the other; unwanted company; inappropriate approaching for a ‘date’; flirting to get your way; the meaning of ‘NO’; defamation; cyber bullying affiliated with sexual harassment; etc. Sexual harassment can be caused by, and happen to anyone regardless of race, gender, sex, status, age, etc.
  • THREATS,  USE OF NEPOTISM, STUDENT INSUBORDINATION: While freedom of creative, thoughtful expression is absolutely encouraged in this course, I will not tolerate any form of insubordination, thoughtless insult, or any form of threat by students (e.g., threat to use a family relation or associate on the school, college center board, or political prestige as a way to bully or ‘corner’ the instructor or other students from progressing or exercising their rights enforced by OLC policy; physical or verbal threats imposed on others; gang related; family related; romantically linked, etc.). If a student feels that another in the class has displayed such hostility, the ‘accused’ will be privately approached by instructor for a resolution. If threats/insubordination persist, OLC administration will be prompted for possible and immediate expulsion from OLC as well as an immediate DROP or ‘F’ grade in my class (in concurrence with OLC policies for student grievance, disciplinary actions, etc.). A student’s personal expression of who they are NEVER LICENSES their right to impose upon another student, faculty, staff, administration, class guest, etc. According to OLC policy, all students are encouraged to practice their right to file a grievance against another student freely.
  • STUDENTS UNDER THE INFLUENCE: On suspicion, the instructor reserves the right to approach intoxicated students under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances. Most likely, these students will be immediately sent home and reported to that OLC college center’s administrative personnel. Students are expected to perform academic assignments while sober, and alert. The teacher will approach a student about their online assignment submissions on suspicion of alcohol influence, use of illegal drugs, illegal use of prescription drugs, and other substances.
  • TOBACCO ON CAMPUS: The use of commercial chewing and/or smoking tobacco for leisure is absolutely prohibited at all OLC college centers and grounds as well as inside the classrooms (whether class is in session or otherwise).
  • DISABILITY: If you feel you have a disability and are in need of assistance to successfully complete this class please contact the OLC Coordinator of Support Services, at (605)455-6040. I am happily always ready to offer any assistance as your teacher to ensure your well being :o)  
  • See OLC 2010-11 Catalog,  and the OLC 2010-11 Academic Planner for more details.
  • CHILDREN: As OLC college center policy states, children of students are not permitted in class while it is in session. Please make arrangements for their care outside class. While children are a blessing, there is no facility available that allows children to be present in classes with their parent(s). I am absolutely strict with this rule. Students who must leave or be absent from class due to child issues will be marked absent for that day/evening. Situation approached on a case by case basis.

*As situations not listed above arise, other codes of conduct, conduct resolutions, etc. will be utilized. Teacher reserves the right to combine the above words and OLC 201-2011 Catalog AND OLC 2010-2011 Academic Planner policies, OLC Policy and Procedure Manual links on the college website (http://www.olc.edu/about/governance/), as well as OLC Administrative personnel regarding class & student conduct along with other aspects listed in this syllabus as deemed necessary (e.g., Academic Integrity & Plagiarism, Policies on Plagiarism or Cheating, etc. ).

 

Course Outcomes:

  1. Students will establish an understanding of global art history and its reflection of the human experience while reinforcing their analytical and critical thinking skills by developing individual theoretical interpretations of the various literary selections studied.
  2. Students will enhance their existing electronic information retrieval skills by accessing examples of critical theory written by other art, literature, history, philosophy, and other cultural scholars.
  3. By studying art history selections of various genres, students will enhance their understanding of how Lakota culture relates to other systems around the world.
  4. By forming individual critical theories based on the art history selections studied throughout the survey and sharing it with their classmates, students will reinforce their oral and written communication skills.
  5. As a result of the course’s reading selections, students will enhance their current reading and art history appreciation skills.

 

 

 

Students will be required to:

  1. Discuss (orally and in writing) various literary genres as represented by the literary selections within the course’s anthology,
  2. Participate in class activities by reading the various literary assignments from the Stokstad anthology,
  3. Complete and submit a personal literary journal in the form of consecutive homework assignments (TBDetailed),
  4. Familiarize themselves with the various art history components associated with the global historic genres,
  5. Maintain and submit a course portfolio (which is composed of submitted assignments to be kept in a folder by the instructor),
  6. Collaborate with other Art History students, along with other English-Communications, and Art majors.
  7. Complete the OLC instructor evaluation for ART 313: Art History, part II.

 

Learning Objectives: The Humanities and Social Sciences department has adopted the following objectives:

  1. The ability to identify, define, solve, & reflect on situations found in literature. (Critical Thinking)
  2. The ability to locate and evaluate information utilizing some current technology. (Research and Writing)
  3. The ability to communicate with accuracy and clarity. (Speaking, Writing, Thinking of Art History)
  4. The ability to read, comprehend, retain, apply and utilize sources of information responsibly. (Reading and Writing)
  5. Develop an understanding of Lakota culture and philosophy within the broader context of a diverse global society.

Oglala Lakota College has adopted the improvement of student learning as an integral purpose related to students’ learning objectives. Additionally, the OLC Humanities and Social Sciences Department encourages this fundamental belief within its ART 313: ART HISTORY, part II course. As a result of the reflective process each student undergoes, students will have the opportunity to develop an enhanced understanding of the integral aspect of global art history’s “human & artful experience” from a multiplicity of perspectives internationally.

 

Learning Outcomes: By the successful completion of ART 313:Art History, part II, students will have demonstrated their ability to enhance their literacy skills (reading and writing) and art history by presenting evidence of critical thinking; communicating clearly and accurately (orally and in writing); comparing Lakota culture and philosophy with other systems within our diverse global society; and an improvement in their overall learning strategies with a level of expertise reflecting the second-year student (sophomore)  or higher level experience.

           

Student Responsibilities and Special Course Requirements: Our department has adopted a course portfolio policy for all of our courses, including Art History. Each student will retain a personal copy of all of her/his activity and assignment materials for her/his course portfolios. Active class participation is an essential element to the successful completion of this course. Each student will be expected to participate by involving herself/himself in each activity and assignment as this course progresses.

 

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Oglala Lakota College has established an academic dishonesty policy. The current OLC college catalog states:

“Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or preparation of papers for credit wherein the student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic dishonesty”. (10)

 

POLICIES ON PLAGIARISM OR CHEATING:

Part of the learning process includes the review and integration of the work of others with your thoughts and ideas. In this process, there is no room for plagiarism, which robs you of meaningful learning and is unfair to the original author. Plagiarism is an ethical violation that is not tolerated at OLC. Oglala Lakota College faculty and staff are fully aware of the many online resources now available and we encourage you to focus on learning rather than the inappropriate use of another person's work without proper citation (a form of acknowledgement).

 

Although a person may give her/his permission to you to utilize her/his words or ideas, it is plagiarism unless you credit her/him for the specific idea or words. You are responsible for understanding plagiarism. Contact me with any questions you may have. Most cases of plagiarism are the result of improper citation or utilization of punctuation (quotation marks) and can be easily avoided. We will utilize the current MLA style manual for this course (I have a copy of MLA style). If you are unfamiliar with it or have forgotten how to utilize the MLA formats, contact me immediately and I can provide you with several sources. However, along with LIT 203, ENG 113 is a prerequisite for this course already.

 

*On suspicion of cheating and/or plagiarism, the teacher reserves the right to search online for phrases and words verbatim from the student’s assignment submission, and to also require the student to rewrite the same assignment (or another work) while the teacher is physically present. The teacher also has the right to suspect then privately approach any student if cheating and/or plagiarism is sensed.

 

Course Geography: Students should use the syllabus as a map or guide to the course. Although you have completed a thorough orientation to OLC, you will still need special directions for each session’s activities and assignments. This will require your weekly participation throughout the semester. Class discussions should include substantive input from each student each week.

 

Course Assignments: There will be a variety of reading and written activities and assignments explicating art history as the course progresses. Among these are interpretive and reflective essays, and course portfolios. Quizzes and additional activities (discussions, presentations, etc.) should be anticipated. I will provide and retain all student work in portfolio folders that I will distribute. ALL ASSIGNMENTS DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF EVERY CLASS or VIA EMAIL PRIOR TO CLASS ATTENDANCE.

 

QUIZZES: Quizzes are held at the very beginning of class immediately following attendance/roll call. Quizzes cannot be made up once completed. Points accumulated during quizzes will be used toward your final grade. Some of the main purposes of quizzing students is to more further: combat tardiness, enforce the reading assignments from the previous week, & to aid students in point accumulation.

 

ELECTRONIC/ORAL MIDTERM & FINAL EXAMS: DATES/TIMES TBD.

 

RESEARCH: While there is no formal research/term paper assigned for this course, students have the option in discussing with me the possibilities of composing one. There may also be an option to present your literary research at an academic conference.

 

Grading Criteria and Total Components of a Grade: Course grades will be based on participation and completion of assignments listed below in syllabus timeline.  For a passing grade, students must obtain 70% or higher. (see below for further information on evaluation standards of written assignments).

Departmental Grading Scale:

A = 90-100 %

B = 80-89   %

C = 70-79   %

D = 60=69   %

F = Below 60 %

 

PARTICIPATION STANDARD/COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS:

OLC’s institutional attendance policy is outlined on page 13 of the current catalog which states:

Students are required to attend class regularly. If a student wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor first. At that time, the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. An excused absence is counted in a student’s total number of absences. A student may be dropped from a course after three consecutive absences at the discretion of the instructor and district director and will be dropped after five total absences. The instructor must submit a drop card by the 15th week or a letter grade.

Additionally, in this course, 2 tardies (consecutive or not) equate one absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class WEEKLY throughout the semester by demonstrating and exhibiting a tertiary level (at the very least) of weekly class involvement having read & screened all assigned materials.

 

Attendance:

  • Attendance in this class is absolutely required.  Much happens in class which can never be made up by reading a chapter or doing some written exercises. 
  • Each student, present or absent, is responsible and accountable for his or her assignments, attendance, and participation.
  • Therefore, the following attendance policy will be followed:
    • Three (3) ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) in a row constitutes an automatic drop.
    • Five (5) scattered ‘unexcused’ absences (largely defined) constitute an automatic drop (or a total of 15 hours missed).
    • Tardiness and leaving early will be recorded (see below). Further, 2 tardies = 1 absence in my class.
    • All ABSENCES – EXCUSED OR UNEXCUSED – will be used to drop each student who has exceeded absences by OLC Registrar. Once a student is dropped, they CANNOT be reinstated (OLC Registrar policy).
    • If your absences affect your performance in class, absences (and tallied tardies) may result in a grade that is dependent upon your attendance/non-attendance.
    • Class begin promptly at 5pm. Students are considered TARDY in this class by 5:01pm.
    • Arrival to class after the first hour is considered an ABSENCE for the day.
  • If you must miss a class in case of an emergency, you should call or email the instructor, and pick up assignments from my box at the college center, or utilize other methods of correspondence in regards to make-up work. Do not call to speak to me once class for the day/evening has begun (9am/1pm/5pm). If you are to be late, or absent for class, please leave a polite message with the college center staff, & leave the message(s) by at least 15 minutes before class begins. Please be considerate.
  • Early leave from class (unannounced & not authorized by the instructor) is considered an absence for the day. Also, if you announce or inform me that you will leave prior to the completion of class (12noon/4pm), it may also be considered an absence. Please inform me via email or by phone ahead of time (15 minutes before class begins) to discuss. NOTE: Simply ‘asking’ the teacher to be excused during class before the day’s course hours are complete does not automatically license a student toward an ‘excused absence’. Please be considerate and serious about your work and class attendance.
  • You should also be aware that drops from my class will very likely affect your financial award:  Pell, Higher Ed., Scholarships, etc. You must be willing to make a commitment in order to be successful in your journey at OLC.
  • At an announced point in time during the semester, the OLC Registrar’s office will drop you from courses if class absences are exceeded. Instructors no longer have the initial control on the OLC Jenzabar site in this regard – EXCUSED ABSENCES also result in OLC Registrar’s Office officially dropping you from class.

 

Feedback Schedule: I hope to provide you feedback the day(s)/week(s) following the submission of an assignment. I will be checking my OLC email (kclose@olc.edu) frequently throughout the week. I will also utilize your OLC email address to communicate with you, & am open to use your other email addresses to correspond with you if needed.

 

Course Procedures and Policies on Late Assignments:

 Late Papers will receive one of the two following grades:

9.             The grade the work actually deserves.

10.         The reduced grade because of lateness.

NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to keep copies of all papers and records of grades in case of a grade dispute.

 

Methods for Delivering Assignments: Each assignment should be submitted by the student (herself/himself). Remember to utilize all of your edit/revision tools learned in ENG 103/113 & LIT 203. Assignment documents can be formatted with the current or older edition of MS Word software. There may be circumstances which may require a student to submit an assignment in an alternative manner. However, the alternative delivery should be discussed with me before the assignment’s due date. You need to retain a copy of all of your activities and assignments. I should never have the only copy of anything (consider a USB flash drive for your archives).

NOTE ON PEER REVIEW: While it would behoove you to allow another person to review & critique your written assignments, I am highly concerned about whom you allow to do so. Please choose a reviewer who is well informed, truly experienced, & positive of the writing level expectations of ART 313: Art History, part II. I strongly suggest you choose an experienced academic tutor to look over your work. Please do not allow them to solely edit/revise, as that task is upon you.

Course Evaluation: I expect students to complete the instructor evaluation distributed at the end of the course. Ideally, this activity will be completed during week thirteen or fourteen of the semester. I value your viewpoint and your assessment of each course. It is vital to my continued development as an instructor.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: At the very least, this literature course will utilize the writing standards used in the ENG 103: Freshman Writing I as far as editing & format are considered. However, the reflective level of ideas should be at the ENG 113: Freshman Writing II level (see attached writing rubric scoring sheets).

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Only students that complete this course with a letter grade of ‘B’ or higher will be allowed LORs, or letters of recommendation.

 

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus is, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered an inflexible ‘contract’ between Oglala Lakota College and any student. The instructor reserves the right to make necessary changes in course content and/or the instructional technique with reasonable notice.

 

 

 

English I Rubric (basic writing evaluation for LIT 203: Intro. To Literature)

The thesis sentence indicates a topic and expresses direction.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The introduction grabs the reader’s attention and introduces the topic.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The body involves information that is developed and supported in topic sentences.  Paragraphs support the thesis.  The evidence is necessary and relevant and contains a balance of both generalities and specifics (details, anecdotes, statistics, etc.)  Claims are supported rationally or empirically.  Transitions are used to signal organization within a paragraph and/or between paragraphs.  The essay is well organized and reads smoothly from beginning to end.  The information is focused and apparent digressions connect with the thesis.  The approach to the topic is interesting,

demonstrates an air of inquiry, challenges what someone says or writes, and makes an evaluation.  When readings and presentations are used, they are evaluated analyzed, and interpreted and not merely summarized.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

The conclusion creates a feeling of closure.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Style:  word choices are appropriate and effective for purpose and audience.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Language Use and Correctness in sentences is clear, coherent and varied.  Writing adheres to the conventions of edited English in mechanics, grammar, and spelling.

            1                      2                      3                      4

 

Essay Scoring Rubric

1

1.  The writer has often launched right into an explanation without a sentence which gives the main idea or central point of the essay.

2.  The evidence or examples used consist of general statements with no specifics, or of several short examples with no general statement to tie them to the topic.

3.  There is often no attempt to create paragraphs in the body of the writing. Often there is one paragraph in the entire essay.

4.  Errors in sentence structure, punctuation, and usage seriously distract the reader at times, and often interfere with meaning.

5.  As the writer moves from point to point, no transition words are used to move the reader along.

6.  The organization of the information in the body of the paper is not clear. Information may be presented as a stream of consciousness without regard for the needs of the reader.

 

2

1.  There is usually a statement of what the topic of the paper is. Often, however, the writer does not state a clear point of view. Sometimes, however, there is a main idea or thesis sentence.

2.  The evidence or examples used consist of either generalities or specifics, such as long stories, but there is not a mixture of both.

3.  There is an attempt to use paragraphs throughout the essay. Usually the central point of each paragraph is clear.

4.  Errors in sentence structure, punctuation or usage periodically distract the reader.

5.  There are a few transition words to link ideas together, or they may be used inappropriately.

6.  The overall organization of the paper is unclear although sections of the paper may be focused. Sometimes the paper is primarily a story.

3

1.  The main idea of the essay is clear, and is stated in the introduction, but sometimes is not stated clearly until the end of the paper.

2.  The evidence used contains both generalities and specifics, but may not be well balanced between them both.

3.  Paragraphing is skillful. In most cases a clear central idea is apparent in each paragraph.

4.  The writer has few sentence level errors. They may be described as mildly distracting.

5.  The writer uses some transitions, but may sometimes use them inappropriately.

6.  While the whole paper “hangs together”, the organization in some places is choppy.

 

4